Newswire : The real story behind that ‘Blacks for Trump’ guy at the Arizona rally

Maurice Symonette pushes wild conspiracy theories and once followed a killer cult leader.

By Nina Golgowski, Huffington Post
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Black man with sign and T-shirt at Arizona rally

Waving a “Blacks for Trump” sign behind President Donald Trump on Tuesday night, he was impossible to miss. Maurice Symonette, who has also called himself “Michael the Black Man” and Maurice Woodside, was an eye-catching figure during the rally in Phoenix. Trump supporters lauded him on social media for his T-shirt reading “Trump & Republicans Are Not Racist.”
Perhaps they should have checked him out first.
Between his signs and his shirt that night, Symonette was also showcasing two websites: blacksfortrump2020.com and gods2.com. Click on either and you’ll be taken to honestfact.com, which spews a range of rambling conspiracy theories.
One claims to link Hillary Clinton with the Islamic State and the criminal gang MS-13. Another declares that “Cherokees are the real KKK Racist Slave Masters, not White Gentiles who are Black Peoples Republican Emancipators!”
Symonette has uploaded a number of long-winded videos on YouTube, often as “Michael the Black Man.” There he discusses his theories on race wars involving Democrats, gentiles, Canaanites and the Cherokee.
Speaking to a Chicago radio station on Wednesday, Symonette said that he arrived early at the Phoenix rally and that allowed him to secure a prominent place close behind the president.
“I wasn’t placed [behind Trump], I put myself there,” he told WLS-AM 890. “I’m glad I was there so I could get the message out, tell people what’s going on with Democrats and the Cherokee Indians that are absolutely destroying the black man and the white man of America.”
When the radio hosts expressed surprise that he would get such a coveted seat, Symonette added, “I don’t really know how it works. They have seen me a lot of times.”
Photos posted online certainly support that statement. Symonette’s Facebook page shows pictures of him posing with a number of high-profile Republican politicians and Trump supporters, including Sen. Marco Rubio (R-Fla.), Sen. Ted Cruz (R-Texas) and the president’s oldest son, Donald Trump Jr. There are also videos of him at a rally with Florida Gov. Rick Scott (R) and celebrating with Trump adviser Kellyanne Conway outside what appears to be Trump Tower in New York City.
And last year, the Miami New Times reported that Symonette and his signs had scored prime seating at more than one Trump rally in Florida.
Symonette has popped up in a number of mugshots as well. His rap sheet lists arrests for racketeering, firebombing, conspiracy in 14 murders, and grand theft auto, the New Times reported in 2011. None of the charges stuck, however.

In the early 1990s, Symonette, who then went by the name of Maurice Woodside, was arrested along with other members of an African-American cult called the Temple of Love, the New Times reported. Its leader, Yahweh ben Yahweh (formerly known as Hulon Mitchell Jr.), was later sentenced to 20 years in federal prison for conspiring to commit murder. Symonette was acquitted.
During Wednesday’s radio interview, Symonette defended Yahweh ben Yahweh as “not violent.” He had told the New Times that he was 21 when he met the Temple of Love leader and became enthralled by the man’s preachings. “He got me by just walking up and saying, ‘All white people are the Devil,’” Symonette recalled. “I was a real militant race warrior right then, so I said, ‘Whoa! Yeah, that’s right!’”
Symonette has said he started following Yahweh ben Yahweh, after the cult leader came up to him and declared “all white people are the Devil.”
Symonette’s views have changed over the years. Long after Yahweh ben Yahweh went to prison, his former follower started participating in political protests against Barack Obama. In 2008, Symonette reportedly claimed that then-Sen. Obama had tried to have him assassinated.
Last year, he tried to paint Hillary Clinton as the presidential candidate who was too close to racists, by accusing her of once “kissing the head of the Ku Klux Klan” and saying, “That’s my mentor.” The trouble with that conspiracy theory was that the man Clinton greeted was the late Sen. Robert Byrd (D-W.Va.), who by the time she praised him had long since evolved from a one-time member of the KKK to a strong supporter of advancing civil rights.

Activists, Black Leaders anticipate what’s next as Federal Courts block Trump’s Travel Ban

 

By Barrington M. Salmon

(TriceEdneyWire.com) – Barely two weeks into his presidency, Donald Trump signed a travel ban targeting Muslims in seven countries effectively blocking citizens, visitors, students, professionals, refugees and even those who worked with the US military in Iraq from entering the United States.

On Feb. 8, that ban was blocked by a three-judge panel of the Ninth Circuit Court of Appeals. It is a ruling that the Trump Administration could appeal to the U. S. Supreme Court or the executive order could be re-written as an attempt to meet legal and constitutional muster.

Before the court ruling, the order denied entry to anyone from Iran, Iraq, Sudan, Syria, Libya, Somalia, and Yemen for 90 days. Trump’s action drew widespread condemnation and fierce opposition from civil rights and immigrant groups, national security experts and analysts and others deeply angered by the discriminatory nature of the ban and their concerns about the ethical and constitutional implications of the executive order. At the same time, Americans spooked by Trump’s constant assertions of an impending terror attack by praised the executive order and are pushing for stricter controls.

Black leaders, including National Urban League President Marc Morial, say the ban opposes American values.

“With the easy stroke of a pen, and a messy rollout, President Trump summarily stopped an entire class of people from entering the country, throwing airports into chaos and confusion, sparking spontaneous protests, delaying or halting family reunions and disrupting the lives of lawful immigrants both within and outside our nation’s borders,” wrote Morial in a statement.

While the executive order fulfilled an oft-repeated campaign promise, administration officials and pundit acknowledged that the hurried nature of the rollout of the order and the decision by the president not to consult with affected agencies or members of Congress created unforeseen problems. This included confusion among those responsible for enforcing the order and chaos at airports as Customs and Immigrations officials detained men, women and children, put others on airplanes back to their points of origin and revoked travelers’ visas.

The ruling of the three-member panel of judges from the US Court of Appeals, based in San Francisco, brought a semblance of calm and order by refusing to lift the emergency stay that a Seattle judge had earlier imposed.

During oral arguments, the federal judges were unconvinced of the administration’s argument, citing among other issues, “the government’s shifting interpretations of the Executive Order and assertions of the president’s broad authority superseding that of the judiciary,” the three-judge panel wrote in the 29-page ruling. “The government has pointed to no evidence that any alien from any of the countries named in the order has perpetrated a terror attack in the United States. (And) rather than present evidence to explain the need for the Executive Order, the government has taken the position that we must not review its decision at all.”

The panel’s ruling continued, “National defense cannot be deemed an end in itself, justifying any exercise of legislative power designed to promote such a goal. It would indeed be ironic if, in the name of national defense, we would sanction the subversion of one of those liberties … which make the defense of the Nation worthwhile.”

Other critics of the travel moratorium – some of whom described it as “Un-American, counterproductive and possibly illegal – hailed the victory. Nihad Awad, national executive director of the Washington, DC-based Council on American-Islamic Relations, while praising the ruling, warned opponents of the measure not to get complacent.

“We applaud this ruling as a reaffirmation of the strength and independence of our system of justice,” he said in a statement. “The decision adds to a long list of federal judges – both Republican and Democratic appointees – who found reason to block this discriminatory order. While this decision is critical, it is not the end of the legal process. Other courts across the country will be passing judgement on the order, and the US Supreme Court will likely weigh in at some point.”

Hillary Clinton, who Trump bested to become president, posted a Twitter message saying simply, “3-0”.

Prior to the ruling, Trump railed against judges in general and decried the politics he said suffuses the judicial system. He also blamed any judges who might rule against him as being responsible if there’s a terror attack against the United States.

“SEE YOU IN COURT. THE SECURITY OF OUR NATION IS AT STAKE,” he tweeted immediately after the verdict.

And to reporters at the White House Trump said: “It’s a political decision. We’re going to see them in court. It’s a very, very serious situation, so we look forward, as I just said, to seeing them in court. It’s a decision we’ll win, in my opinion, very easily.”

Justice Department officials said in a statement that they were reviewing the decision and contemplating options. The case could be headed to the US Supreme Court which is short one justice. With the 4-4 liberal-conservative split on the High Court, it’s quite possible that the 9th Circuit ruling would reaffirm the lower court ruling. Perhaps this reality led administration officials to say that they would eschew going to the Supreme Court and pursue redress in federal courts.

This legal saga portends what could be the first of any number of legal challenges to Trump’s controversial policies and pushback against his view that the executive has primacy over the judiciary despite constitutional checks and balances.

The swift and furious public response to the travel ban caught authorities and activists observers by surprise.

“The spontaneous support has been amazing. We called for a rally in Boston and 20,000 people came out. Normally, it’s like pulling teeth,” said Ibrahim Hooper, national communications director for the Washington, DC-based Council for Islamic-American Relations. “I’m not surprised at all that this has happened. He’s been telegraphing his intention to impose a complete ban since last year. We’d been expecting, anticipating some type of ban. This has had a tremendous impact on travelers, visiting grandmothers, students, and people coming and going home. It’s been a nightmare.”

Hillary Clinton wins Alabama Black Belt by 56,741 votes, more than Trump’s win in Michigan and Wisconsin

By: John Zippert, Co-Publisher

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By John Zippert, Co-Publisher

Looking back over the final results of the 2016 Presidential election, according to Politico, Donald Trump received 306 electoral votes and 61,201,031 popular votes while Hillary Clinton received 232 electoral votes and 62,523,126 popular votes. In Alabama, Trump won by 1,306,925 to 718,084 popular votes for Clinton.
Based on Politicos figures, Hillary Clinton won the election by 1,322,095 popular votes or a little over 1% of the total votes cast, including those for third party candidates.
The results for the 12 county Black Belt area (including Montgomery) was 32,095 more votes for Clinton in the eleven counties (shown in the chart) and 56,741 more votes in the entire band of blue across the south central part of the state from Mississippi to Georgia.
Trump won Michigan’s 16 electoral votes by a margin of 11,612 votes (2,279,805 for Trump to 2,268,193 for Clinton).
He won Wisconsin’s 10 electoral votes by 27,257 (1,409,467 for Trump to 1,382,210 votes for Clinton). Trump carried Pennsylvania’s 20 electoral votes by 68,136 votes. In the three closest states, Trump’s margin of victory was 107,005 votes.
Trump earned that 46 vote Electoral College victory by a slim margin in those three states.
The 56,741 votes of residents of the Alabama Black Belt were more than Trump’s margin of victory in two states – Michigan and Wisconsin.
Don’t let anyone tell you that your vote doesn’t matter or doesn’t count. Every vote counts and everyone who is not registered, or did not have the proper voter id, or was too lazy to come to vote is responsible for the results.

Map of Alabama – counties

http://www.politico.com/2016electionresults/
map/president/alabama

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Hillary Clinton is now more than 2.5 million votes ahead of Donald Trump

hillary-clinton Hillary Clinton

It’s three weeks after the US election, but we’re only just getting a final tally (and it’s not set in stone yet) as some of the ballots took a long time to be counted. This is the current situation:

Votes for Hillary Clinton: 65,152,310

Votes for Donald Trump: 62,626,216

Votes for other candidates: 7,373,248

The Democrats are 2,526,094 votes ahead – but they won’t be in power after January 20. Due to the American ‘electoral college’ system, it doesn’t matter that Hillary won the popular vote by such a striking majority.

Her vote share, at 1.9% ahead of Trump, is bigger than that of 10 US presidents. In most situations, it would be an impressive victory. She actually got more votes than any presidential candidate in history, except for Barack Obama.

If all the extra people who voted for Hillary over Trump came together to form a state, that state would be more populous than New Mexico, Hawaii, Nebraska and West Virginia (and a dozen others that we didn’t have the space to list).

Why has it taken so long to count votes? States such as California still counted postal votes even if they arrived days after the election, as long as they were mailed on election day. Other states delayed their declaration because they thought the vote could be close and they might need a recount. Problems with voting machines could lead to a delay too, as well as actual recounts.

You generally expect that the person who wins the most votes wins the election, but that’s not how it always works in practice. You can bet that if Donald Trump had won the popular vote but lost the election, many of his supporters would have been out on the streets calling for blood. The ‘rigged system’ was a major feature of Trump’s campaign and he regularly complained that US democracy was in crisis.

‘The electoral college is a disaster for a democracy’, he even tweeted in 2012.And in a now-deleted tweet, he claimed in 2012 (inaccurately): ‘[Obama] lost the popular vote by a lot and won the election. We should have a revolution in this country!’

Since that same system helped him get to power, however, he seems to have had a change of heart. Now, it’s ‘actually genius’.

However, people who feel their vote effectively didn’t count are unlikely to agree. You’d imagine that one person, one vote, makes things equal. But actually, there are vastly different numbers of individual votes which make up one electoral college vote (the one that actually counts).

In California, for example, it takes around half a million people to make up one electoral college vote. But in Wyoming, which will contribute three electoral votes in total, there are only around 143,000 voters for each one. In other words, a vote in Wyoming is worth around four times as much as in California.

– See more at: http://nehandaradio.com/2016/12/02/hillary-clinton-now-winning-popular-vote-ridiculous-amount/#sthash.AlE96Jjc.dpuf

 

 

 

NEARLY 90% OF BLACK VOTERS FAVOR CLINTON OVER TRUMP IN NEW HU/NNPA NATIONAL BLACK VOTER POLL

blackvoterpoll_nnpahu_graphic_web120-1280x640WASHINGTON, D.C. — Today, the National Newspaper Publishers Association (NNPA) and Howard University, announced the results of the 2016 Howard University/NNPA National Black Voter Poll. Nearly 90 percent of Black voters plan to cast ballots for Hillary Clinton and two percent plan to vote for Donald Trump, according to the poll.

The HU/NNPA national polling center, located on the campus of Howard University, made over 21,200 telephone calls across the United States from October 23, 2016 to October 30, 2016.

The HU/NNPA National Black Voter Poll revealed that the top issues influencing Black voters included the economy and jobs, income inequality, race and race relations, college affordability and high quality education in pre-kindergarten.

Howard University faculty and students from multiple departments and disciplines including economics, political science, sociology, communications and media studies, were represented in the coordinated effort.

“This multi-disciplinary team has drawn on its expertise to develop a comprehensive polling instrument designed to assess the opinions of Black Americans on the presidential candidates and other important issues facing the Black community and the nation,” said Terri Adams-Fuller, the associate dean of the College of Arts and Sciences at Howard University.

Highlights from the HU/NNPA National Black Voter Poll:
• 94% of those polled plan to vote in the upcoming election
Of those who plan to vote:
• 89.8% for Clinton
• 2% for Trump
• 0% for Johnson
• 0% for Stein
• 7.2% for another candidate
The respondents also identified their party affiliations:
• 82 % Identify as Democrat
• 2% Identify as Republican
• 9% Identify as Independent (67% normally vote for Democrats, 5% normally vote             Republican, 28% normally don’t vote for either major party)
• 7% Identify as Other

“As a result of this poll, candidates and those who will be successful in occupying the White House and controlling Congress will know the prioritized issues and nuanced concerns of the Black community,” said Rubin Patterson, the chairman of the Department of Sociology and Anthropology at Howard. “We hope that these findings will shape their policy and legislative agendas starting next year.”

Benjamin F. Chavis, Jr., the president and CEO of the NNPA said that the NNPA-HU National Black Voter Poll is timely and very significant for Black America.

“The fact that 94 percent of Black Americans polled indicated that they intend to vote on November 8, or have already voted during the early voting period is indicative of the importance of the right to vote in Black America at a time when there has been inaccurate speculation about how Blacks in United States view the 2016 national elections,” said Chavis.
Chavis added: “This poll provides clarity on the national issues and the candidates for President of the United States. The poll verifies that Hillary Clinton is the overwhelming favorite of Black American voters over Donald Trump.”

Unions picket outside Trump’s Washington DC Hotel

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Union members picket at Trump’s Hotel

Hundreds of workers protested outside Donald Trump’s newly-opened hotel in Washington, D.C. on Thursday to demand he recognize and negotiate with the union at Las Vegas’ Trump International Hotel.

Workers at the Las Vegas hotel, which is half-owned by the Republican presidential candidate, voted to organize in Dec. 2015 and the union was recognized by the National Labor Relations Board earlier this year.

However, Trump and the hotel management have refused to recognize the vote of roughly 500 workers, saying it was “anything but free and fair.”

Workers representing some of the country’s largest labor unions, including the AFL-CIO, CWA, AFSCME, and UNITE Here were holding banners and chanting: “What do we want? Contract! When do we want it? Now!”

Similar pickets have been organized also outside Trump hotels in New York, Chicago, San Francisco and Honolulu.

During his polemical presidential campaign, Trump has shown his disdain for unions, saying that wages are “too high.”

With just weeks to go until Election Day on Nov. 8, polls show Trump is losing, with a widening gap between he and his Democratic Party rival, Hillary Clinton. His numbers dropped following the revelations of a lewd tape in which he boasted about sexually assaulting women.

 

 

 

Trump ally apologizes for Hillary Clinton Blackface Tweet as candidates battle for voters of color

Another tweet showed her sporting blonde braids.

Written By Charise Frazier, Newsone

Tweet of Hillary in Blackface

Mark Burns that shows Hillary Clinton in Blackface

Pastor Mark Burns, a Black Trump surrogate, apologized for tweeting out two controversial photos of Hillary Clinton on Monday. One depicted her in Blackface, while the other showed her with blonde braids.

The tweets accused Clinton of pandering to Black voters and set off a firestorm of reaction, only one month after Burns gave a bizarre benediction at the RNC, calling Clinton “the enemy.”

The photo caption for the first tweet reads, “Black Americans, THANK YOU FOR YOUR VOTES and letting me use you again..See you again in 4 years.” Clinton is holding a sign that says “#@!** the police,” and is wearing a shirt that says “no hot sauce, no peace,” a reference to comments earlier this year during which the candidate confessed her love for the condiment. Many lashed out at Clinton after, saying she played into the tired stereotype that references Black people and their love for hot sauce. The tweet also played into Burns’ criticism that Clinton’s views don’t side with those who support police.

Another tweet shows Clinton with blonde braids, with the caption, “When you need the Black vote.”

Burns initially doubled down on his statements in a fiery interview on MSNBC with Kristen Welker, but then later in the day released an 11-minute Periscope post acknowledging his actions.

“The last thing I want to do is to offend people. The tweet was not designed to anger or stir up the pot like it did. It was designed to bring how I feel a very real reality as to why the Democratic party and how I view it have been pandering and using black people just for their votes…,” he said on Periscope.

The tweets come on the heels of Trump’s visit to Detroit on Saturday, where he plans to address the Great Faith Ministries Church and tape an interview with Bishop Wayne T. Jackson, according to a statement Jackson released Monday via The Detroit Free Press.

Trump’s visit is part of his campaign’s new focus to reach out to Black voters. A recent NBC News poll shows Trump only has 8 percent of the Black vote. In the first few weeks of August, Trump has repeatedly made tone-deaf statements to Black voters at rallies with mostly White audiences, asking them, “What the hell do you have to lose?”

Jackson also offered an invitation to Clinton in his statement. “The goal for this interview is to get real answers and Trump’s views and plans on policies that affect our community,” he said.

Burns also weighed in on Trump’s visit, saying the candidate will “answer questions that are relevant to the African-American community, such as education, unemployment, making our streets safe and creating better opportunities for all. He will then give an address to outline policies that will impact minorities and the disenfranchised in our country.”

Do you think these tactics are helping Trump win self-loathing Blacks and White moderate voters?