COVID-19

As of July 8, 2020 at 10:00 AM
Alabama had 46,424 confirmed cases of coronavirus with 1,032 deaths

Greene County had 188 confirmed cases with 8 deaths; 22 more cases in a week
Sumter Co. had 285 cases with 12 deaths

Hale Co. had 317 cases with 22 deaths

Coronavirus Testing in Greene County

Thursday, July 9, 2020
Eutaw Activity Center
9:00 AM to 12 Noon
University of Alabama Medical Outreach

Saturday, July 11, 2020
Jena, Alabama
Volunteer Fire
Department
9:00 AM to 12 Noon
Greene Co. Coronavirus Testing Team

Thursday, July 16, 2020
Eutaw, Alabama
behind City Hall
9:00 AM to 12 Noon
Maude Whatley Health System


Saturday, July 18, 2020
Tishabee, Alabama
place – TBA
9:00 AM to 12 Noon
Greene County Coronavirus Testing Team

Selma Bridge Crossing Jubilee names new Principal Coordinator

Drew Glover a California native is the Selma Bridge Crossing Jubilee’s new Principal Coordinator.
Glover replaces Faya Rose Toure, who co-founded the Jubilee with her husband and former State Senator Hank Sanders. Toure was the Jubilee’s unpaid coordinator for the last 28 years.
“It is an honor and privilege to follow in the footsteps of giants who have come before me and who have kept this powerful and important event strong for decades,” Glover said in a release. “Because of them, I have this opportunity as well as the Civil Rights that I and other people of color have today.”
Glover, a Santa Cruz, California native, has a background in nonviolence education and addressed social inequities around issues of race and systemic oppression.
The 56th annual Bridge Crossing Jubilee is scheduled for March 4-7, 2021. The events include the annual crossing the Edmund Pettus Bridge, Miss Jubilee pageant and Freedom Flame Awards.
Glover said he plans to bring new events to the jubilee, including a venture summit for young entrepreneurs, a new educational symposium on social change and virtual portal for people around the world to participate in the celebration.
“In a moment in history when police brutality and systemic racism are prevalent across the nation, what is clear is the tremendous work still left to do,” Glover said. “The Bridge Crossing Jubilee is something everyone should experience because it educates, uplifts and reminds us of the power of the people when they unite in the fight for justice.”

Larry Coleman is candidate for Eutaw Council seat, District 4

I, Larry Coleman, am a candidate for Eutaw City Council, District 4. While I was growing up as a child in Greene County, I was schooled on many lifelong lessons. My parents, Mr. and Mrs. Willie and Bertha Coleman, taught me the values of hard work, education and faith in God. After graduating for Paramount High school, I made Detroit, MI my home for many years and worked for Chrysler Motor Company for six years and Valassis Printing Company for over eighteen years. Upon returning to my hometown, I was employed with Johnson Controls for over seventeen years. 
Until this day, my faith and my upbringing continue to guide my thinking and service. I am a member of Mt. Zion, Mt. Hebron Baptist Church where I serve in several capacities including Superintendent of Sunday School and a member of the Deacon Board, Usher Board, and Finance Committee.
Now that I have returned home, my wife, Margaret Coleman, and I enjoy living in Eutaw. After taking an inventory of many needed improvements in the city of Eutaw, I feel compelled to take an active role in civic involvement to bring about positive changes. Serving as city councilman is not an easy task, but I will pledge my efforts, time, and cooperation and will work relentlessly to fulfill the responsibilities of this position. In addition to working to fulfill the duties of District 4 Councilman, I will be an advocate for the citizens of District 4 as well as the entire city. Furthermore, I want to help bring about changes that will strengthen the connection among city leaders.
My goal is not to seek personal accomplishments or recognition. Instead, my energies will be exerted to help the City of  Eutaw. It is not about us; it is about the city.

Joe L. Powell seeks Eutaw Mayoral seat

I, Joe L. Powell, humbly announce my candidacy for Mayor of Eutaw. I have served on the Eutaw City Council for 16 years and currently serving as Chairman of the Finance Committee. During these 16 years, I have also served on several committees for the Alabama League of Municipalities and currently serving on the Committee of State & Federal Legislation and Transportation, Public Safety and Communication.
I have served 16 years as a proven leader with sound decisions and if I am elected as your Mayor, I will serve you to the best of my ability with a strong leadership for all citizens. My plans for the city are: to establish an Advisory Council to the Mayor and Council from all segments of the city, a voice for all the citizens; to continue to develop Exit 40 with more infrastructures; create more jobs for our citizens; hire more Police Officers to patrol our city; hire more city workers for each department; continue to provide affordable housing for all citizens and revitalize downtown Eutaw.
I have completed the League’s Basic and Advanced Certified Municipal Official (CMO) programs and am currently working on my CMO Emeritus designation, which requires a minimum of 120 credit hours of continuing formal training in municipal government.
Through these programs, I have received formal classroom training in subjects such as council meeting procedures; parliamentary procedures; the Open Meeting Law; public records; ordinance drafting; conflict of interest; the State Ethics Law; duties of the mayor and council; tort liability; the competitive bid law; zoning and planning; annexation; municipal regulatory powers; municipal revenues and expenditures; personnel actions; and leadership development.
I was born in Greene County, Eutaw, AL, graduated from Eutaw High School in 1979, attended Stillman College and earned a BA Degree in (History) Social Sciences and Auburn University with 18 semester hours in Adult Education. I am currently employed with the Shelton State Community College as a GED Instructor.
I am a member of the New Peace Missionary Baptist in Eutaw, where I serve as Chairman of the Deacon Board, member of the Choir and Church Clerk. I am married to Elizabeth Benison Powell, we have four children: Sharnika, Al, Jocelyn and Jaleel and two grandsons, Darius and Jamari. I am currently a member of the following Local Organization: The Greene County Children’s Policy Council, Alabama New South Coalition, Eutaw Airport Authority Board, Greene County Health Advisors, AEA, and Secretary of the Greene County District Association.
I am asking that you go to the polls on August 25, 2020 and cast your vote for Joe Powell, Mayor of Eutaw, and a man with Leadership for All Citizens.

Encouraging Signs of Hope during COVID-19 A partnership between Greene Co. Alumnae Chapter of Delta Sigma Theta, Sorority, Inc. and the Black Belt Community Foundation

Mayor James Gaines and Town of Union members receive a banner for display from DST chapter member Loydleetta Wabbington.
Hale County EMS and Hospital receive banners for display. Fans were produced for Greene and Hale Counties.

A plan to spread joy throughout the Black Belt during the most historic and monumental time of our lifetime is being executed because of a partnership between the Black Belt Community Foundation’s Black Belt Joy Project, and the Greene County Alumnae Chapter of Delta Sigma Theta Sorority, Incorporated.
The goal is to express, in a creative manner, our appreciation to the First Responders and the Class of 2020 graduates in the chapter’s two county service areas. “We want local citizens to enjoy the artistic and creative weatherproof banners and signs of hope and encouragement presented to the Class of 2020 and to the first responders in Greene County and Hale County”, said Mrs. Isaac N. Atkins, President of the Greene County Alumnae Chapter of Delta Sigma Theta Sorority, Incorporated.
We engaged the services of two local artists to help convey these messages to both our first responders and the Class of 2020 graduates. The theme for the first responders is a spirit of gratitude for their love, care and help provided daily during COVID-19. To the Class of 2020, we want to encourage and inspire hope and pride as they experience monumental and historic times.
The signs and banners display a beautiful spirit of social distancing and wearing masks while encouraging the citizens to enjoy the beauty of the message from the convenience of their vehicles and as they are walking.
Banners, fans and magnets were given to the municipalities of Eutaw, Boligee, and Forkland, Greensboro, Moundville and Akron. Be on the lookout for these beautiful signs in Greene County and Hale County, AL. Remain encouraged and stay safe and healthy. Wear a mask.

Newswire: Cuba’s two pandemics: The Coronavirus and the US Embargo

By Josefina Vidal Ferreiro, Al Jazeera

Cuban doctors mobilize for service in the pandemic


The Trump administration is trying to hinder Cuba’s efforts to tackle the coronavirus emergency at home and abroad.
As soon as the first cases of COVID-19 were detected in Cuba, our country mobilized all its resources to contain the spread of the virus.
Our healthcare workers go door to door checking people for possible symptoms. Those with symptoms are transferred to specially designated centres to receive treatment, mostly with medication developed by Cuba’s own pharmaceutical and biotech industry. The medical examinations and treatments are all provided free of charge.
As of June 20, 85 people have died of COVID-19 in Cuba. Our mortality rate of 3.9 percent is very low compared to the rest of the world. We reached the peak of the disease on April 24, but we are still encouraging people to respect physical distancing, isolation and sanitary measures.
Internationally, Cuba has responded to requests for collaboration from more than 20 countries, mainly in Latin America and the Caribbean, but also in Europe, Africa and the Middle East.
Cuba has a long history and tradition of international solidarity with other countries in the health sector that dates back to the 1960s, when we started sending healthcare workers to help other countries. From then on, more than 400,000 Cuban doctors and health professionals have provided services in 164 countries. We have helped strengthen local healthcare systems, provided services in remote areas and trained doctors.
Based on this long experience, in 2005 Cuba decided to create the Henry Reeve International Medical Brigade to respond to natural disasters and serious epidemics across the world. Since then, this brigade of over 7,000 doctors, nurses and other health specialists has provided services in more than 20 countries.
We sent doctors and nurses to staff 32 field hospitals after the 2005 earthquake in Pakistan. We sent a medical team to Indonesia in 2006 after the devastating tsunami. We sent more than 1,700 health workers to Haiti in 2010 after the catastrophic earthquake and the ensuing cholera epidemic. In 2014, we sent brigades to Liberia, Guinea and Sierra Leone to combat Ebola.
Even Samantha Power, former US President Barack Obama’s UN Ambassador, praised Cuba for its outstanding role in the fight against Ebola.
We even had brigades ready to assist Louisiana after New Orleans was hit by Hurricane Katrina but the US government rejected our cooperation.
Assisting others has always been part of who we are as a country and part of the ethical training Cuban doctors and health professionals receive.
In response to the current pandemic, Cuba has dispatched 28 contingents of the Henry Reeve Brigade to help 26 countries. This is in addition to the more than 28,000 Cuban doctors, nurses and health professionals who were already overseas before the pandemic.

Unfortunately, Cuban doctors and the Henry Reeve Brigade, in particular, have come under increasing attacks by the Trump administration, which has gone so far as to falsely accuse Cuba of human trafficking through its doctor program.
It is a shame that the United States government has been trying to discredit Cuba’s international assistance, including using pressure and threats against countries to force them to cancel these medical cooperation agreements.
They have even tried to pressure governments to reject Cuba’s help during the coronavirus pandemic. They claim the Cuban government is exploiting these doctors because in the case of countries that can afford to provide monetary compensation, a portion of it is kept by the Cuban government.
However, working overseas is completely voluntary, and the portion the Cuban government keeps goes to pay for Cuba’s universal health system. It goes to purchasing medical supplies, equipment and medication for Cuba’s 11 million people, including for the families of the doctors who are providing their services abroad. This is how we are able to provide free, high-quality healthcare for the Cuban people.
Instead of exacerbating conflict during a pandemic, our countries need to work together to find solutions. For years, Cuba has been developing pharmaceuticals and vaccines to treat different diseases, from psoriasis and cancer to heart attacks. Now we are helping patients recover from COVID-19 with Interferon Alfa2b Recombinant, one of 19 medications being developed or under clinical trial in Cuba by our biotech and pharmaceutical industries to treat different stages of COVID-19. Globally, we have received more than 70 requests for pharmaceuticals developed by Cuba.
This would be a clear avenue for Cuba-US cooperation but unfortunately, the Trump administration is wasting this opportunity by dismantling the limited progress made by Cuba and the US during the Obama administration.
President Trump strengthened the 60-year US blockade against my country, implementing 90 economic measures against Cuba between January 2019 and March 2020 alone. These measures have targeted the main sectors of the Cuban economy, including our financial transactions, tourism industry, energy sector, foreign investments – which are key for the development of the Cuban economy – and the medical cooperation programmes with other countries.
These unilateral coercive measures are unprecedented in their level of aggression and scope. They are deliberately trying to deprive Cuba of resources, sources of revenue and income needed for the development of the Cuban economy. The effects of these measures are being felt in Cuba, particularly during the COVID-19 pandemic. The blockade is stopping Cuba from getting much-needed medical supplies. For example, if more than 10 percent of the components in the medical equipment or medications we want to buy are of US origin, then Cuba is not allowed to purchase them.
In addition, the US has imposed restrictions on banks, airlines and shipping companies to stop Cuba from receiving materials that other countries are donating or sending to Cuba.
In April, the Alibaba Foundation of China tried to donate masks, rapid diagnostic kits and ventilators to Cuba, but the airline contracted by Alibaba to transport those items to Cuba refused to take the goods because they were afraid the US would sanction them.
A ship recently arrived in Cuba with raw materials to produce medications but it decided not to unload because the bank involved in the transaction decided not to make the payment out of fear it would be sanctioned by the US government.
So this is why we say we are suffering from two pandemics: COVID-19 and the US blockade. For that reason, it is so important that people of goodwill around the world continue to raise the demand to end the blockade of Cuba and to forcefully assert that these are times for solidarity and cooperation, not sanctions and blockades. In the meantime, Cuba, as a country that understands the value of solidarity, will continue to do our best to stop the spread of coronavirus at home and globally.

Newswire: Breonna Taylor’s family claims no aid was offered after she was fatally shot

By: Stephanie Guerilus, The Grio

Breonna Taylor

Breonna Taylor’s family is not only holding the Louisville police responsible for her death but they are now alleging that medical aid wasn’t offered to the young woman after she was fatally shot eight times.

The bombshell claim was made Sunday in a new 31-page legal filing by the family of Taylor, The New York Times reported. It is their belief that the EMT technician suffered in agony for up to six minutes during what they believe was a “botched” raid in March.

“In the six minutes that elapsed from the time Breonna was shot, to the time she died, we have no evidence suggesting that any officer made entry in an attempt to check and assist her,” Sam Aguiar, the family’s lawyer, said in an interview. “She suffered.”

Taylor died on March 13 during a botched drug raid that she was not the target of. Taylor, who worked at two local hospitals, was shot as police were serving a ‘no-knock warrant’ related to a narcotics investigation.

Kenneth Walker, Taylor’s boyfriend, called 911 to report someone was breaking into their apartment. As police fired on the couple, Walker returned fire and Taylor was shot eight times. She died at the scene.

Walker was arrested at the scene for attempted murder but the charges against him were later dropped. No narcotics were found in the home and her family filed a lawsuit against the three police officers involved in the shooting.

Officials with the city have pushed back against the suggestion that she was left to die, insisting it is a “gross mischaracterization.”

The coroner who performed Taylor’s autopsy stated that Taylor experienced life ending injuries and any intervention on the 26-year-old would have been in vain. She believed that Taylor died “less than a minute,” after being shot. “Even if it had happened outside of an ER we couldn’t have saved her,” Dr. Barbara Weakley-Jones said.

The filing also declared that Taylor’s death was due to gentrification and not a drug raid gone wrong. It was alleged that Mayor Greg Fischer wanted the land Taylor lived on for redevelopment and officers were tasked with clearing out the area.

“People needed to be removed and homes needed to be vacated so that a high-dollar, legacy-creating real estate development could move forward,” Taylor’s family said.

The mayor denied the “outrageous” allegations through his spokeswoman Jean Porter. “They are insulting to the neighborhood members of the Vision Russell initiative and all the people involved in the years of work being done to revitalize the neighborhoods of west Louisville.”

Newswire: Statue of abolitionist Frederick Douglass vandalized in Rochester, New York Park

By Nina Golgowski, Huffington Post

Frederick Douglass



A statue of abolitionist Frederick Douglass was ripped from its base in an upstate New York park over the weekend, authorities said, prompting concerns that the act may have been revenge for the nation’s ongoing removal of Confederate monuments.
The vandalism in Rochester’s Maplewood Park took place sometime on Sunday, police said. The day marked the 168th anniversary that Douglass, speaking in Rochester, gave one of his most famous speeches condemning slavery.
The statue was found at the brink of the Genesee River gorge, approximately 50 feet from the pedestal where it had stood. Its base and left hand were damaged, and there was no graffiti or any other markings left by the perpetrators, who remained at large as of Monday afternoon.
An investigation into the incident is ongoing, police told HuffPost.
The statue’s removal came as anti-racism protesters across the country have toppled or petitioned for the removal of statues and other memorabilia that commemorates the former Confederacy. The motive for removing Douglass’ statue was not immediately clear, however.
Douglass was born a slave in Maryland and, after securing his freedom, dedicated his life to abolitionism and social reforms.
In Rochester on July 5, 1852, he delivered one of his most famous speeches, “What to the Slave is the Fourth of July?” which called out the hypocrisy in Americans celebrating independence when there were still slaves among them.
“What, to the American slave, is your Fourth of July? I answer: a day that reveals to him, more than all other days in the year, the gross injustice and cruelty to which he is the constant victim,” Douglass proclaimed.
The statue in Maplewood Park was one of 13 in Rochester that honored Douglass’ life and long-time residence in the city. The Maplewood Park holds its own historical significance, as it often served as the final stop for escaped slaves on the Underground Railroad, the secret network of routes and safe houses that slaves used to reach free states and Canada, according to the National Park Service.
Carvin Eison, a leader of the project that brought the Douglass statue to the park, told the Democrat and Chronicle that the statue’s damage is beyond repair but that another will take its place.
He questioned whether the destruction may be related to the removal of other monuments across the country, in a possible act of “retaliation.”
“They can topple over this monument, they could go topple over all of them, this monument will still stand because the ideas behind it are bigger than the monument,” he told local news station WROC.
Rev. Julius D Jackson Jr., whose historically Black fraternity Alpha Phi Alpha, led a march to Douglass’ gravesite in Rochester on Sunday, also said he wouldn’t be surprised if the act was done out of retaliation.
“We’ve been down this road before,” Jackson told WROC, citing the 2018 vandalism of another Douglass statue in the city. “I would like to believe it’s not that, it was just some kids. But it wouldn’t surprise me if it’s some retaliatory, something going on.”
Two college students were charged for the 2018 incident. Both reportedly apologized for what happened and blamed alcohol, not racism, for fueling the act.

Newswire : Black jobless rate was 15.4 percent in June

by BlackmansStreet.Today


The Black Unemployment rate June was 15.4 percent in June, down from 16.8 percent in May, the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics reported last week.
The jobless rate for Black men, 20 and older, however, rose to 16.3 percent in June compared with 15.5 percent in May, BLS reported. However, the unemployment rate for Black women dipped to 14.0 percent with 16.5 percent in May.
Overall, the U.S. nonfarm payroll employment rose by 4.8 million in June on top of 2.7 million in May.
But, because so many jobs were lost in March and April, we are still 14.7 million jobs below where we were in February, before the pandemic spread, writes Elise Gould, senior economist at the Economic Policy Institute, and
In June, jobs were added due to many states continuing to lift the stay at home requirements.
Job gains occurred primarily in leisure and hospitality, an increase of 2.1 million, a significant share of the overall rise of 4.8 million. The unemployment rate fell as well, from 13.3% in May to 11.1% in June. At 11.1%, the unemployment rate remains higher than in the worst month of the Great Recession, when it hit 10.0% in 2009.
Hires are up because states relaxed their stay-at-home orders concerning pandemic, but more economic pain is on the horizon because the latest coronavirus data is that the relaxed restrictions on social distancing also had the effect of increased cases leading to some states to pause re-openings. In Florida and Texas, Covid-19 cases are spreading. Texas surpassed 200,000 Covid-19 cases over the July 4 holiday.
Losses in public-sector employment will affect Black workers more, particularly Black women, Gould and Shierholz wrote. That’s because Black women have the highest share of jobs in the public sector.
The Black unemployment rate is much higher compared with other racial and ethnic groups.
BLS reported that the jobless rate for Hispanics was 14.5 percent and jobless rate for Asians was 13.8 percent. For Whites, the jobless rate was 10.1 percent. For white men, the unemployment rate was 9.0 percent.

Newswire : Native American groups ask NFL to force Washington Redskins name change

By: Stephen Whyno, AP Sports Writer

Native Americans protest racism

WASHINGTON (AP) — More than a dozen Native American leaders and organizations sent a letter to NFL Commissioner Roger Goodell on Monday calling for the league to force Washington Redskins owner Dan Snyder to change the team name immediately.

The letter was signed by 15 Native American advocates and obtained by The Associated Press. It demands the team and the NFL cease the use of Native American names, imagery and logos — with specific importance put on Washington, which last week launched a “ thorough review ” of its name.

The letter was delivered on the same day that President Donald Trump voiced his opposition to any name change by the team. Several team sponsors have come out in favor of change recently and Snyder showed his first indication of willingness to do so amid a nationwide movement to erase racially insensitive symbols.

According to their letter, the groups “expect the NFL to engage in a robust, meaningful reconciliation process with Native American movement leaders, tribes, and organizations to repair the decades of emotional violence and other serious harms this racist team name has caused to Native Peoples.”

The NFL did not immediately respond to a message confirming receipt of the letter. Goodell last week expressed support for Snyder’s review process of the name.

Retired PGA Tour golfer Notah Begay, IllumiNative founder Crystal Echo Hawk, two former executive directors of the National Congress of American Indians and several authors and professors signed on to the letter, which wants a full re-branding of the team “to ensure that continuing harm is not perpetuated by anyone.”

Trump is against re-branding the Redskins and Major League Baseball’s Cleveland Indians, who are also considering a name change.

Trump tweeted: “They name teams out of STRENGTH, not weakness, but now the Washington Redskins & Cleveland Indians, two fabled sports franchises, look like they are going to be changing their names in order to be politically correct.”

Snyder had been steadfast against changing the name on several occasions since buying the team in 1999. Last week, sponsors FedEx, PepsiCo, Nike and Bank of America released statements saying they requested a change, and several online stores removed the team’s gear.

“We believe it is time for a change,” PepsiCo said.

FedEx CEO Frederick Smith is a minority owner, and the company is the title sponsor of the team’s stadium in Landover, Maryland. The sudden flood of sponsors coming out against the name prompted the organizational review announced Friday.

“This process allows the team to take into account not only the proud tradition and history of the franchise but also input from our alumni, the organization, sponsors, the National Football League and the local community it is proud to represent on and off the field,” Snyder said.

The death of George Floyd in Minneapolis police custody in May sparked protests and a nationwide debate on racism. That conversation renewed calls for Snyder to change the name called a “dictionary defined racial slur” by Native American advocates and experts.

“We’ve never been faced with a greater opportunity and moment for this to finally happen,” Echo Hawk said last month.

“Native Americans have been working and fighting on this issue for decades, decades and decades, and I think really talking with different Native leaders around the country, this is the moment. There’s really no excuse now for this Washington team and for the NFL to do the right thing.”