Hospital dedicates imaging suite for Dr. Sandral Hullett, retired medical director

Dr. Marcia Pugh, GCHS Adminstration with Dr. Sandral Hullett (seated) and Strelitzia King, niece, Amberly Smith, niece and Gloria H. Smith sister of Dr. Hullett, beneath new plaque naming the imaging suite for Dr. Hullett
Dr. Sandral Hullett and family members cut ribbon on new
imaging center suite.
Dr. Marcia Pugh (L) and John Zippert, GCHS Board chair stand with plaque honoring Zippert, which will be place in Physician Clinic Conference Room named to honor him for his service to the  GCHS.
Dr. and Mrs. Rucker Staggers, former doctor and nurse at the hospital stand with Dr. Sandral Hullett, their medical colleague for many years.

On Sunday afternoon, November 21, 2021, the Greene County Health System held a ceremony to name and dedicate the new imaging wing of the Greene County Hospital in honor of Dr. Sandral Hullett, retired medical director of the facility.

The imaging suite includes the new X-ray room, a new 16 slice CT scanner, an ultrasound room and related office and patient spaces. An older 4 slice CT scanner, was located in a trailer behind the hospital building. This has been replaced by a new and more modern machine, inside the facility.

A plaque on the wall recognizing Dr. Hullett for her service and assistance to rural health care in the Alabama Black Belt was unveiled by Dr. Hullett and members of her family. Dr. Hullett is currently a resident of the Greene County Nursing Home.

Dr. Marcia Pugh, GCHS Administrator thanked Dr. Hullett for her years of dedicated service to the people of Greene County. “We are especially happy that we were able to upgrade and bring the CT scanner inside. We will no longer have to bring our patients out the back door to a trailer in inclement weather. The X-ray and ultrasound equipment have been similarly upgraded. We have also improved our Emergency Room facilities and equipment.

“We encourage Greene County residents to visit our GCHS facilities and see the many improvements for themselves. We want the residents of Greene County to have quality and affordable health care, without having to travel to other out-of-town facilities, unless they need specialized care that we cannot provide. Because of the coronavirus, we had to limit participation in this ceremony, but we want people to know about and use our improved facilities, when you need them.” stated Dr. Pugh.

As part of the ceremony, the hospital also unveiled another plaque to honor John Zippert, Chairperson of the Board of Directors, to be placed in the Conference Room of the Greene County Physician’s Clinic, which was named for Zippert, several years ago.

Newswire : House passes transformational Build Back Better Act,but will the Senate follow suit?

Pre-school classroom

By Jane Kennedy

(TriceEdneyWire.com) – Frequently compared to President Franklin Roosevelt’s New Deal, the $1.9 trillion package – the Build Back Better Act – includes investments in child and elder care, universal pre-K and an extension of the child tax credit to provide economic security for tens of millions of working families and pathways to return to the job market. It also addresses the adverse effects of climate change.

“Honoring President Biden’s vision and addressing the needs of the American people, this legislation presents the most historic and transformative agenda in a century. Build Back Better will forge extraordinary progress for the American people: creating good-paying jobs, lowering costs and cutting taxes, while making the wealthiest and big corporations pay their fair share,” House Speaker Nancy Pelosi wrote in a letter to her colleagues.

The Build Back Better Act provides a list of social benefits that would address issues of high importance to African-Americans. President Biden hopes it will be passed by the predominately Democratic Senate and reach his desk shortly after Thanksgiving. Among the benefits:

Lowers Health Care Costs:

Approximately 3.9 million Black people were uninsured in 2019. Despite the Affordable Care Act’s premium subsidies, coverage under the ACA was too expensive for many families, and more than 570,000 Black people fell into the Medicaid “coverage gap” and were locked out of coverage because their state refused to expand Medicaid. President Biden’s framework closes the Medicaid coverage gap while also lowering health care costs for those buying coverage through the ACA by extending the American Rescue Plan’s lower premiums, which could save 360,000 black people an average of $50 per person per month. With these changes, more than one in three uninsured Black people could gain coverage. It also makes an historic investment in maternal health. Black women die from complications related to pregnancy at three times the rate of White women.
The legislation will also:
• Empower Medicare to negotiate lower drug costs for seniors and halts Big Pharma’s outrageous price hikes above inflation for all Americans.Ensure Americans with diabetes don’t pay more than $35 per month for their insulin.
• Create a new, out-of-pocket cap of $2,000 on what seniors pay for their drugs in Medicare Part D.
• Lower premiums dramatically for those who buy insurance on their own through the Affordable Care Act.
• Extend affordable coverage through the Affordable Care Act to millions of Americans in states that have refused to expand Medicaid.
• Expand Medicare to make hearing care more affordable for seniors.
Lowers Child Care & Family Care Costs:

The cost of child care has placed a serious financial burden on Black parents who are two times more likely than White parents to have to quit, turn down, or make a major change in their job due to child care disruptions. In addition, only 26.8 percent of Black 3- and 4-year old children are enrolled in publicly-funded preschool, while the average cost of preschool for those without access to publicly-funded programs is $8,600. Most families will save more than half of what they currently spend on child care, and the vast majority of families will pay no more than 7 percent of their income for child care. It will also reduce the cost of home-based care for the hundreds of thousands of older adults and people with disabilities who need it but lack access. Investment in home care will raise wages for home care workers, 28 percent of whom are Black.
The Build Back Better Act also saves most families more than half their current spending on child care, ensuring the vast majority of families will have to pay no more than 7 percent of their income for child care.
It also:
• Expands the basic promise of free schooling in America for the first time in 100 years with universal pre-school for all 3- and 4-year-olds.
• Establishes a universal and permanent paid family and medical leave program, providing four weeks of paid parental, family caregiving, and medical leave.
• Gives more than 35 million families a major tax cut by extending the Biden Child Tax Credit.
• Expands access to high-quality home care for older adults and people with disabilities.
• Cuts the cost of postsecondary education, with such steps as increasing the maximum Pell Grant.
• Reduces families’ housing costs and expands housing options.
Housing and Nutrition

The coronavirus pandemic exposed and created many inequities related to housing and left millions of Americans in fear of facing eviction or foreclosure. Thirty percent of Black renters pay over half their income in rent. The Build Back Better Act will enable the construction, rehabilitation, and improvement of more than one million affordable homes, boosting housing supply and reducing price pressures for renters and homeowners. It also will make investments to improve the safety, energy efficiency, and quality of existing public housing, where nearly half of residents are black, and expands the availability of housing choice vouchers to hundreds of thousands more families, including the nearly half of current voucher holders who are Black. In addition, it calls for the removal of lead-based paint from housing units, which disproportionately affects Black children, and provides grants for resident-led community development projects in neighborhoods that have faced systemic disinvestment.

Food insecurity is another problem that has disproportionately affected Black households at a higher rate than the national average, particularly during the pandemic. To help ensure that no one has to worry about whether they can provide nutritious food for themselves or their children, the Build Back Better framework will ensure that the nutritional needs of Black children are met by expanding access to free school meals during the school year and providing students with resources to purchase food over the summer.

What’s Next?

On the night the Build Back Better vote was to take place, House Minority Leader Kevin McCarthy forced a delay until the following morning by delivering an 8 hour, 32-minute floor speech—the longest in House history—during which he assailed the legislation as “big government socialism.” And, as with most legislation passed by the U.S. House of Representatives, not a single Republican supported the bill, which also lost the support a lone Democrat who voted against it. Now it’s the Senate’s turn. Senate Majority Leader Chuck Schumer hopes to pass the bill by Christmas, but he first has to convince all 50 Democrats and the two independents who caucus with them to back the plan. It won’t be easy. The paid family leave provision may be cut to satisfy a demand from Sen. Joe Manchin, and Sen. Bernie Sanders will call for provisions in such areas as Medicare and climate to be strengthened. Any changes to the legislation will have to be voted on in the House, where Pelosi holds a razor-thin majority and can only afford three defections from her party.

In the meantime, Democrats have some selling to do. Many of the bill’s provisions won’t go into effect until after the 2022 mid-term election cycle where Democrats will go head to head for control of both houses. They will need to convince the American public of the many ways their lives will be made easier and more affordable by the Build Back Better Act.

Newswire: Private funeral held in South Africa for de Klerk, last of the Apartheid-era presidents


Nelson Mandela and de Klerk sharing Nobel Peace Prize in 1993

Nov. 16, 2021 (GIN) – There will be no state funeral for South Africa’s last white president, Frederick Willem de Klerk, his foundation said in a published statement.
 Instead, Mr. de Klerk will have a private burial following cremation on Nov. 21 for family members that will be closed to the media. He was 85 years of age.
De Klerk, who won praise worldwide for his role in scrapping apartheid and shared the Nobel Peace Prize with Nelson Mandela in 1993, has a conflicted legacy among the country’s Black population for his failure to curb political violence in the run up to South Africa’s first democratic elections in 1994.
 There was little appetite among South Africans for a state funeral – which ultimately was not scheduled to take place.
 De Klerk passed away after a battle with cancer at his home in the Fresnaye area of Cape Town. After his death, his foundation published a video in which he apologized for “the pain and the hurt and the indignity and the damage” apartheid caused during decades of white minority rule.
 His previous refusal to apologize came as recently as last year when he said he did not believe apartheid was a crime against humanity. He also angered right wing Afrikaners who viewed him as a traitor to their causes of white supremacy and nationalism by ending apartheid.
 Lukhanyo Calata, son of the anti-apartheid activist Fort Calata, claimed the former president was directly involved in his father’s death and should have been held accountable. Instead, he took “the secrets about the murders of our fathers to the grave.”
 Fort Calata and fellow activists Matthew Goniwe, Sparrow Mkonto and Sicelo Mhlauli were community leaders, guilty of such things as being part of a Marxist reading group, forming street committees, writing a letter to the municipality about dirty streets, fighting an unfair rental system and writing for a community newspaper. 
 In December 1984, Goniwe called for a boycott known as the “Black Christmas” of white-owned shops, infuriating the white business community. The boycott was successful as the Lingelihle community did not buy food or liquor from white-owned stores.
 In 1985 they were abducted and murdered by South African security police under orders of the apartheid regime. The so-called Cradock Four who came from the town of Cradock, were members of the anti-apartheid United Democratic Front.
 A document leaked to the press years after their deaths resulted in the removal of several police officers. At the second inquest, a judge ruled that the “security forces” were responsible, but named no one individual.
 Calata, Goniwe, Mhlauli and Mkonto were buried in Cradock on July 20,1985, at a massive political funeral attended by thousands of people from all over the country. Speakers at the funeral included Beyers Naudé, Allan Boesak and Steve Tshwete. A message from the then president of the ANC Oliver Tambo was read. It was also the first time that a huge SA Communist Party flag was unfurled and openly displayed at the funeral.
 De Klerk oversaw the end of white minority rule as the country’s last apartheid president and shared the Nobel Peace Prize with Nelson Mandela.

 

 

Newswire: Kyle Rittenhouse found not guilty of all charges

By Stacy M. Brown, NNPA Newswire Senior National Correspondent

Kyle Rittenhouse escaped punishment in the shooting deaths of two men during the unrest that followed the 2020 police shooting of Jacob Blake in Kenosha, Wisconsin.

The jury deliberated for about four days, before issuing unanimous verdicts on all counts.

The jury considered five charges against the now 18-year-old: First-degree reckless homicide, use of a dangerous weapon – or that Rittenhouse recklessly caused the death of Rosenbaum under circumstances that showed utter disregard for human life.

First-degree recklessly endangering safety, use of a dangerous weapon – or that Rittenhouse recklessly endangered the safety of Richard McGinniss — a journalist with the conservative Daily Caller — under circumstances that show utter disregard for human life.

First-degree intentional homicide, use of a dangerous weapon – or that Rittenhouse did cause the death of Huber, with intent to kill him.

First-degree recklessly endangering safety, use of a dangerous weapon – or that Rittenhouse did recklessly endanger the safety of an unknown male, referred to as “jump kick man” in court, under circumstances that show utter disregard for human life.

Attempted first-degree intentional homicide, use of a weapon – or that Rittenhouse attempted to cause the death of Grosskreutz, with intent to kill him.

Right-wing groups are trying to cast Rittenhouse as a hero for vigilantism and support for unbridled gun rights since he crossed state lines carrying an AR-15 semi-automatic weapon and was acquitted for killing two people and injuring others.

Black leaders and others are pointing to this case as a “mis-carriage of justice” and indication that the justice system does not treat Black and white defendants the same way. Others are calling for Federal civil rights charges against Rittenhouse.

Newswire: Investigators exonerate men convicted in the 1965 assassination of Malcolm X

Malcom X

By Stacy M. Brown: NNPA Newswire Senior National Correspondent

Two of the men found guilty of the assassination of Malcolm X had their convictions thrown out on Thursday, the Manhattan district attorney, and lawyers for the two men said, according to the New York Times.

The stunning reversal recasts history and reopens the case of the slaying of Malcolm X, who died in a hail of gunfire at the old Audubon Theater in New York’s Harlem area.

The exoneration of the two men, Muhammad A. Aziz, and Khalil Islam, represents a “remarkable acknowledgment of grave errors made in a case of towering importance: the 1965 murder of one of America’s most influential Black leaders in the fight against racism,” the Times reported.

The newspaper noted that a 22-month investigation conducted jointly by the Manhattan district attorney’s office and lawyers for the two men found that prosecutors and two of the nation’s premier law enforcement agencies — the Federal Bureau of Investigation and the New York Police Department — had withheld key evidence that, had it been turned over, would likely have led to the men’s acquittal.

The two men, known at the time of the killing as Norman 3X Butler and Thomas 15X Johnson, spent decades in prison for the murder, which took place on Feb. 21, 1965, when three men opened fire inside a crowded ballroom at the Audubon Ballroom in Manhattan as Malcolm X was starting to speak.

Earlier this year, the civil rights leader’s daughters formally requested that authorities reopen the murder investigation because of new evidence.

“Any evidence that provides greater insight into the truth behind that terrible tragedy should be thoroughly investigated,” said Ilyasah Shabazz, one of Malcolm X’s six daughters.
Shabazz and her family cited a deathbed letter of confession from a man who was a policeman at the time of the 1965 killing, alleging New York police and the FBI conspired in the murder.
Raymond Wood wrote his responsibility was to ensure Malcolm X’s security team were arrested days before he was shot dead in Manhattan, the daughters stated.

The men convicted were all members of the Nation of Islam and were each sentenced to life in prison. At the time of his death, Malcolm X had separated himself from the Nation of Islam.
Assassins gunned him down at the age of 39.

Newswire: Kamala Harris becomes first woman with presidential powers in U.S. history as Biden gets colonoscopy

President Biden with Vice-President Harris

By Stacy M. Brown, NNPA Newswire Senior National Correspondent

Call her Madam President. Vice President Kamala Harris received presidential powers on Friday to occupy the commander-in-chief role while President Joe Biden underwent a colonoscopy.

Because the procedure requires anesthesia, the transfer of powers was deemed necessary.
White House Press Secretary Jen Psaki remarked that the president underwent the procedure at Walter Reed Medical Center as part of his yearly health checkup.

She said the transfer of power isn’t unusual nor unprecedented.“As was the case when President George W. Bush had the same procedure in 2002 and 2007, and following the process set out in the Constitution, President Biden will transfer power to the Vice President for the brief period of time when he is under anesthesia,” Psaki insisted. “The Vice President will work from her office in the West Wing during this time.”

The press secretary for former President Donald Trump, Stephanie Grisham, claimed that Trump refused anesthesia before a colonoscopy in 2019 because he chaffed at turning over power to Vice President Mike Pence.

The United States has never had a woman president, and Harris’ technically didn’t become president but obtained the powers of the presidency. It was only expected to last for not more than one hour.

President Biden selected Harris to serve as vice president after a lifetime of public service.
Harris served as San Francisco’s district attorney, California’s attorney general, and in the U.S. Senate.

A graduate of Howard University and the University of California, Hastings College of Law, Harris became the first woman and first person of color to serve as vice president.

Alabama New South Coalition praised by Ben Chavis in Fall Convention keynote speech

Dr. Benjamin Chavis

By: John Zippert, Co-Publisher

 

Dr. Benjamin Chavis, President and CEO of the National Newspaper Publishers Association (NNPA) was the keynote speaker for the Alabama New South Coalition’s virtual Fall Convention this past Saturday.

Chavis, a veteran civil rights fighter and current president of the national association of 200 Black newspapers, praised ANSC, “Alabama is a better state because of the Alabama New South Coalition and your organizing, advocacy and community building work over the past 35 years.”

“ANSC was organized in response to racial issues facing Black people and has continued with perseverance and courage to educate and uplift people in the state to fight injustice and build unity among people” said Chavis.

He said the forces of oppression and opposition: White Supremacy, Racism, Economic Exploitation and World Domination of people of color are still out there. “Every time we take a step forward, they react and try to push us backwards.”

Chavis said, “I hope you will continue to involve young people in the struggle. We have to be intentional about involving, embracing and encouraging young people to participate in our struggle. When I started working in the movement at 13, my parents did not scold me or stop me, they pushed me along.”

He spoke about his dissatisfaction with the Kyle Rittenhouse verdict of not guilty on all charges, in the murder of two and the injuring of several others demonstrators in Kenosha, Wisconsin. “The judge acted like one of the prosecutors in this case. Rittenhouse crossed state lines with an AR-57 rifle and the judge prevented the jury from deciding on this charge. Notions of white supremacy are still a part of our criminal justice system,” he said.

He closed saying, “We as a people need to retain our serious spirituality but not wait on God. God wants us to get involved, speak up and speak out for ourselves and we need to get involved in the struggle to change our lives for the better, as you in ANSC have tried to do.”

The ANSC Fall Convention also included a panel of state legislators speaking on issues of concern to the members in Alabama. State Senator Rodger Smitherman of Birmingham spoke about the lawsuit he has filed together with Senator Bobby Singleton and others on the newly adopted Congressional redistricting plan. They say the lines are drawn to “pack” Black voters in the 7th Congressional District when there are more equitable
District lines that can be drawn to enable the election of two Black members of the U. S. House of Representatives and allow for the plan not to divide counties into more than one district. Smitherman said he hoped the court would rule soon before the May 24, 2022 scheduled primary elections.

Representative Barbara Drummond of Mobile reported on steps the State of Alabama had taken to mitigate the coronavirus pandemic. She was critical of Governor Ivey’s use of $400 million of state coronavirus funds for prison construction instead of assisting health care for Black and poor people.

State Senator Malika Sanders Fortier spoke on efforts to find a sustainable stream of funding in the state, to support the state’s matching funds needed to expand Medicaid. “We cannot use Federal funds from the virus funding as the state’s match for Medicaid, we must identify new state monies from gam9ing or other sources, which can support Medicaid expansion for the working poor.”

State Representative Merika Coleman of Bessemer, Alabama spoke on the work of the special legislative committee to remove racist language from the Alabama State Constitution. The committee after an educational process,
Agreed to change some major provisions to remove racist language. These changes will be the subject of additional Constitutional amendments to be approved by the voters in upcoming elections.

The members of ANSC approved re-election of state officers for a second two-year term, including Debra Foster, President, Everett Wess, First Vice President, Sharon Wheeler, Treasurer, Matilda Hamilton, Recording Secretary and Patricia Lewis, Corresponding Secretary. The Second Vice-President, who must be a youth, is Leslie Jones of Wilcox County replacing Ivan Peoples of Greene County.

Eutaw Mayor Johnson gives first State of the City Address, listing specific fixes and improvements

Mayor Lastasha Johnson

Eutaw Mayor Latasha Johnson created another first for the City of Eutaw by delivering a very detailed State of the City address at a community luncheon held Friday, November 19, 2021, at the R.H. Young Community Center (the former Carver school).
The mayor prefaced her comments with reflections on her upbringing. “ I was raised in Eutaw in Carver Circle. I learned the value of hard work at an early age and I continue to maintain a strong work ethic. I want to see the city that raised me and made me who I am today, thrive and grow.”
Mayor Johnson served four years on the Eutaw City Council before seeking the mayor’s position.
In her address she provided a summary of the troubled areas of the city government that existed when she came into office. “The previous administration ended with a majority of the police officers resigning, the water department having several ADEM violations, our city property with an IRS tax lien, and a lack of office personnel to handle the day-to-day operations of the city, no budget or financial plan”
The Mayor’s report also listed the various improvements she and her Team Eutaw have put in place in the previous year. “We have resolved the IRS lien, after fines, penalties and interest of a quarter million dollars. We have a new city clerk. We have implemented and updated a city website and Facebook page. We have a new phone system and internet set up which is expected to reduce expenses by as much as $40,000 each year. We have worked on a community notification system and implemented a new budgeting and financial management system that will keep us on budget,” she said. The mayor noted that her administration was the first to have a budget passed in many years.
According to Mayor Johnson, the city’s revenue for the past year fiscal year was nearly $1.2 million, nearly doubling that of several previous years, and boasting a $260,000 surplus.
The mayor discussed other improvements brought about by her administration as listed below:
Hired a full time water and wastewater operator, and other employees including police officers a Park and Recreation Director, additional magistrates.
* Provided pay raises for city employees.
* Obtained new vehicles and equipment, including a street sweeper, grapple truck
* Secured a $500,000 grant for the Eutaw Airport Authority.
* Working to provide the first independent audit of city finances in eight years.
* Working hard to bring openness and transparency to City Hall with online meetings and community engagements.
* Resumed relations with the Chamber of Commerce, the Industrial Development Authority, and neighboring municipalities.
* Supporting Greene County E911.
Installed online payments and auto pay for the first time.
Upgraded all technology.
City will secure a new garbage company.
Cancelled unnecessary contracts and reduced expenses.
Mayor Johnson extended special appreciation to the various individuals who worked tirelessly to bring about the changes and adjustments needed to put the city on the right track. “ I want to thank everyone, the police officers, office staff, the street workers, city council and citizens who have been instrumental in making my first year in office a hugh success. I could not have done any of this without you. I am thankful and humbled by your hard work,” she stated.

COVID-19

As of November 18, 2021 at 10:00 AM
(according to Alabama Political Reporter)

Alabama had 841,483 confirmed cases of coronavirus,
(1,530) more than last week with 16,043 deaths (62) more
than last week)

Greene County had 1,297 confirmed cases, (4 more cases than last week), with 45 deaths

Sumter Co. had 1,368 cases with 40 deaths

Hale Co. had 3,161 cases with 89 deaths

Note: Greene County Physicians Clinic has testing and vaccination for COVID-19; Call for appointments at 205/372-3388, Ext. 142; ages 18 and up.

Family Members and Authorities Desperately Search for two Alabama men missing in California

Prayer Vigil at the Old Greene County Courthouse Square
LaDexter Pelt and John DuBose Jr.,
Police in California and the Black and Missing Foundation seek assistance in locating two African American men from Alabama who went missing after they arrived in Sacramento on Friday, November 5.
Authorities said LaDexter Pelt, 25, of Greene County, Alabama, and John DuBose Jr., 20, of Tuscaloosa, Alabama, boarded a flight after Pelt celebrated his birthday. LaDexter is the son of Eutaw City Councilwoman Tracy Hunter  who also works at Greene County High School as secretary.  
Sunday, November 14, 2021 a prayer vigil was held, drawing a large crowd.
Authorities said they know that the men arrived in California, but their whereabouts remain a mystery. Heightening the tension, a hunter found a cell phone that belongs to Dubose, and police said it last pinged in the Sutter Bypass Wildlife Area, an approximately 3,200-acre region that includes two long, narrow parcels on each side.
Police have searched the area and have reportedly questioned the hunter but have not developed any new leads.
“This is a case that we’re very much watching,” said Derrica Wilson, the co-founder of the Black and Missing Foundation, which has spotlighted the plight of missing people of color for 14 years.
Pelt’s mother, Tracy Hunter, has expressed her fears and pleaded for her son’s safe return.
“I have every reason to be concerned because my child would’ve called me by now,” a shaken Hunter told reporters.
“He let me know that he made it to Sacramento, California, and we said goodbye for now. And that was it,” Hunter said, adding that both her son’s and DuBose’s phones are now disconnected.
“This is totally out of the ordinary,” she asserted.
Authorities said Pelt has short, black hair. He has brown eyes, stands six feet tall, and weighs 220 pounds.
DuBose is 5’6 inches and weighs 140 pounds. He has black hair and brown eyes.
“LaDexter and John, if you are out there, please contact your family members,” Hunter said. “We are distraught; we are mentally exhausted. And as a mother, I am mentally torn and heartbroken.”
Anyone with information should contact the Sacramento Police Department at 916-808-5471 or the Greene County Sheriff’s Department at 205-372-3152.
Individuals can also call the Selma Police Department at 334-874-2137 or contact the Black and Missing Foundation at http://www.BAMFI.org.