Eutaw City Council appoints board and committee members, reviews water system issues, E-911 and pays bills

Shown L to R: Eutaw Police Officer Tyler Johnson, Asst, Chief Kendrick Howell, Chief Tommy Johnson, Mayor Pro Tem LaJeffery Carpenter, Officers Robert Geter and William Smith displaying their new uniform. Chief Johnson stated he has an open door policy. Look professional and act professional. We are here to help our citizens.

At its regular meeting on January 26,2021, the Eutaw City Council
dealt with several outstanding issues including naming people to city committees and boards, reviewing continuing problems with the water system, support for E-911, reviewing an agreement for joint work with the County Commission and Industrial Board, setting lease rates for space at the Carver School Community Center and paying bills.
The Mayor and City Council appointed members of the following boards and committees:
• Eutaw Zoning Board: John Zippert, Broderick Fulghum, Cynthia Cooper, Corey Cockrell, and Shirley Eubanks
• Eutaw Housing Authority Board: James Powell, Jonathan Lewis, Jacqueline Allen, and Isaac N. Atkins
• Eutaw Medical Clinic Board: Judy Jarvis, John Zippert and Joyce Cotton
• Eutaw Historical Commission: Evelyn Davis, Gilda Jowers, Diane Liverman, Carol P. Zippert, Sharon Trammell, Johnnie Mae Knott, Sandra Walker, Judy Jarvis
• Eutaw Cemetery Board: Nicolas Wilson, Joseph Fritz, Suzette Powell, Sharon Trammell, and Connie Tyree
The Council took up the issue of setting a rental payment for use of rooms at the Carver School Community Center. The CRFD, a non-profit agency has had a space for a year and Liberty Tax, a business. is requesting a space. Councilwoman Tracey Hunter raised the concern that the monthly charge includes utilities. Mayor Johnson said it was a community center not a business, so the city was not likely to recover all costs for the facility, but needed to charge a fair rate for non-profits and others. Hunter then moved to table the issue until more research and information was available.
The Engineers of the South (EOS), the consulting firm that is currently contracted to monitor the operations and quality of the Eutaw Water System was present and stated their interest in supporting efforts to improve the system. The spokesperson for EOS said that they would provide a proposal to increase time on monitoring the system, help in auditing and correcting faulty meters and replacing meters that could not be repaired. EOS is also answering an ADEM complaint about the water system, which was sent to the past Mayor but never answered.
The City also has a proposal from Kathie Horne of Water Management Associates for improving and repairing problems with the water system. Her agreement is for three years and charges $6 per meter, per month. Mayor Johnson said the city has 1,400 water meters, which means that Horne’s contract is for $8,400 a month or more. Johnson said she wasn’t sure if the city could afford this contract and welcomed other proposals, like one from EOS. The Mayor said this would be discussed in more detail at a Council Work Session on Tuesday, February 2nd.
The next agenda item was a pledge by the City since 2004, to provide $30,000 a year for the operation of the E-911 emergency assistance and dispatching services, which has never been paid. Johnny Isaac, Chair of the E-911 Board was present and said, “In 2004, I was the Sheriff and Reginald Spencer was Eutaw Chief of Police, we agreed to transfer dispatching services to E-911. This is saving the city between $200,000 and $300,000 a year. We hope you can support us with $30,000 that was pledged but never paid. The monies we get from the phone bill tax of $1.86 per customer is not sufficient to operate E-911”
Mayor Johnson said the City should pay $30,000 a year to support E-911, from bingo funds. The Council agreed and supported this expense.
The Council reviewed an agreement between the City, County Commission and Industrial Development Authority for development of the Interstate 59/20 Exit 40, especially the location of a motel and other projects to improve the county. The Council tabled this issue for further discussion at the upcoming work session.
The Council received a listing of outstanding bills for the months of November, December and January, which they approved for payment.

Newswire : Black Lives Matter movement nominated for Nobel peace prize

By The Guardian

Black Lives Matter protestors


The Black Lives Matter movement has been nominated for the 2021 Nobel peace prize for the way its call for systemic change has spread around the world.
In his nomination papers, the Norwegian MP Petter Eide said the movement had forced countries outside the US to grapple with racism within their own societies.
“I find that one of the key challenges we have seen in America, but also in Europe and Asia, is the kind of increasing conflict based on inequality,” Eide said. “Black Lives Matter has become a very important worldwide movement to fight racial injustice.
“They have had a tremendous achievement in raising global awareness and consciousness about racial injustice.”
Eide, who has previously nominated human rights activists from Russia and China for the prize, said one other thing that impressed him about the Black Lives Matter movement was the way “they have been able to mobilize people from all groups of society, not just African-Americans, not just oppressed people, it has been a broad movement, in a way which has been different from their predecessors.”
The Black Lives Matter movement was co-founded in 2013 by Alicia Garza, Patrisse Cullors and Opal Tometi in response to the acquittal in the US of the man who shot Trayvon Martin. It gained wider recognition in 2014 following protests over the deaths of Michael Brown and Eric Garner, and was the wellspring of a series of global protests in 2020 following the deaths of George Floyd and Breonna Taylor.
Nominations for the Nobel peace prize are accepted from any politician serving at a national level, and they are allowed just 2,000 words to state their case. The deadline for this year’s submission is 1 February, and by the end of March the committee prepares a shortlist. The winner is chosen in October and the award ceremony is scheduled for 10 December. There were more than 300 nominations for last year’s award, which was ultimately awarded to the World Food Program.
The committee awarded the WFP because it wanted to “turn the eyes of the world to the millions of people who suffer from or face the threat of hunger”, but perhaps the most high profile nomination last year was for former US president Donald Trump.
Trump was nominated for a second time by another Norwegian MP, Christian Tybring-Gjedde. The far-right MP cited Trump’s role in normalizing relations between Israel and the United Arab Emirates under the Abraham Accords, although Eide said Tybring-Gjedde had “a little difficulty defending that nomination” after the Capitol riot of 6 January when a pro-Trump mob stormed the US Congress buildings and five people died.
Eide, however, said he didn’t want his nomination for Black Lives Matter to be seen as a comment on domestic US politics. And he dismissed criticism from rightwing voices that the group had been behind violence in US cities. “Studies have shown that most of the demonstrations organized by Black Lives Matter have been peaceful,” he said. “Of course there have been incidents, but most of them have been caused by the activities of either the police or counter-protestors.”
Data assembled by the Armed Conflict Location and Event Data project in September 2020 showed that 93% of Black Lives Matter demonstrations involved no serious harm to people or property.
The 61-year-old politician, who has represented the Socialist Left party in parliament since 2017, cited precedents of the Oslo-based Nobel prize committee recognizing the battle against racism. Albert Luthuli and Nelson Mandela received the prize in 1960 and 1993 respectively for advocating against racial discrimination in South Africa, and Martin Luther King was awarded the prize for non-violent resistance against racism in the US in 1964. Mandela shared his award with FW de Klerk, the man who ordered the ANC leader’s release from prison.
“There is actually a tradition for doing this,” Eide said. “It’s a strong linkage between antiracism movements and peace, and a recognition that without this kind of justice, there will be no peace and stability in the society.”
His written nomination concludes: “Awarding the peace prize to Black Lives Matter, as the strongest global force against racial injustice, will send a powerful message that peace is founded on equality, solidarity and human rights, and that all countries must respect those basic principles.”

Newswire: Biden signs executive orders aimed at tackling racism in America

President Joe Biden

By Stacy M. Brown, NNPA Newswire Senior National Correspondent


President Joe Biden signed a series of executive orders that his less than two-week-old administration hopes will be a catalyst to tackling America’s long-standing race problem. Biden’s action focused on equity and included police and prison reform and public housing.
“America has never lived up to its founding promise of equality for all, but we’ve never stopped trying,” President Biden wrote on Twitter just before signing the executive orders.
“I’ll take action to advance racial equity and push us closer to that more perfect union we’ve always strived to be,” the President proclaimed.
Within hours of taking the oath of office on Jan. 20, President Biden signed 17 executive orders to reverse damaging policy put forth by the previous administration. Throughout his campaign, President Biden pledged to do his part in the fight against systemic racism in America.
One of the Jan. 20 executive orders charged all federal agencies with reviewing equity in their programs and actions. President Biden demanded that the Office of Management and Budget analyze whether federal dollars are equitably distributed in communities of color.
On Tuesday, Jan. 26, the President reinstated a policy from the Barack Obama administration that prohibited military equipment transfer to local police departments. The President noted the disturbing trends he and the rest of the country reckoned with in the aftermath of the police killing of George Floyd, Breonna Taylor, and others.
The order prevents federal agencies from providing local police with military-grade equipment, which was used by Ferguson, Missouri officers after police shot and killed an unarmed Michael Brown.
The previous administration reinstated the policy to allow federal agencies to provide military-style equipment to local police.
Like Obama, President Biden has said he also would attempt to eliminate the government’s use of private prisons where unspeakable abuses of inmates – mostly those of color – reportedly occur almost daily.
President Biden also issued a memo that directs the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development to promote equitable housing policies with the executive orders. He also signed an order to establish a commission on policing.

SOS holds ‘Peoples Tribunal’ at Federal Courthouse in Montgomery, finds Tuberville and six Alabama Republican Congressmen guilty of seditious conspiracy

The Save Ourselves Movement for Justice and Democracy (SOS) held a “Peoples Tribunal” on the sidewalk in front of the Frank M. Johnson Jr. Federal Courthouse in Montgomery on Tuesday, January 26, 2021 at Noon.
The ‘Peoples Tribunal’ found that U. S. Senator Tommy Tuberville and six Republican Alabama Congressmen: Mo Brooks (5th District), Barry Moore (2nd District – Montgomery area), Mike Rogers (3rd District – Wiregrass), Robert Aderholt (4th District – central Alabama) and Gary Palmer (6th District – Birmingham) were guilty of undemocratic, criminal and racist acts when they voted on January 6, 2021 against certification of the votes of the Electoral College for President and Vice President.
Their votes came after an insurrectionist attack on the U. S. Capitol by a rightwing mob, inspired by President Trump, Mo Brooks and other Congressional leaders. Senator Tuberville and the Alabama Congressmen were challenging the votes of primarily African-Americans in the large cities, like Atlanta, Philadelphia, Pittsburgh, Milwaukee, Detroit and Phoenix, of the swing states of Arizona, Wisconsin, Michigan, Pennsylvania, and Georgia.
The “Peoples Tribunal” indicted Senator Tuberville, Mo Brooks and the other Congresspeople for:•Seditious conspiracy – to interfere in the central functioning of our government – in this case the certification of the votes of the Electoral College for President Biden and Vice-President Harris.
•Solicitation of others to commit crimes to defeat democracy.
•Voter suppression and intimidation.
•Racism toward denying the legitimate rights of Black, Brown and poor people.
•Assault and Homicide against the Capitol police, District of
Columbia police and other innocent people caught up in the mobs murderous rage, which resulted in the death of five people and the serious injury of hundreds of others.
•Unlawful Possession of Firearms, Explosives and other Weapons.
•Interstate travel in the interest of racketeering and conspiracy.

•Vandalism, trespassing, and violations of restricted area provisions of Federal and local laws.
SOS, ANSC and Black Lives Matter leaders played the roles of judge, prosecutor and witnesses for the “Peoples Tribunal” to expose and condemn the actions of Tuberville and the six Congressmen. Witnesses present testimony and photographic exhibits of the crimes, including photos of a hangman noose erected by rioters outside the Capitol, demonstrators carrying Confederate flags in the Capitol and other images of the insurrection.
Members of SOS, ANSC and the public who attended the Tuesday protest served as the jury, which voted to convict these Alabama officials.
Faya Rose Toure, attorney, activist and SOS leader said, “Trump, Tuberville, Mo Brooks and one hundred congresspersons are guilty of attempted murder of democracy and the Constitution of the United States of America. Their efforts to disqualify the votes of Black and Brown people underlie their racist approach to the changing conditions and demographics of our nation. There must be consequences for their action.”
John Zippert, SOS Steering Committee member said, “The undemocratic and unacceptable actions of Trump, Tuberville and the six Congressmen has impact on many issues facing us going forward to contain the coronavirus, to achieve jobs and economic equity, to Expand Medicaid and other issues are dependent on responsive and responsible Congresspersons, not reckless insurrectionists”
Persons interested in learning more about or to support the protest may contact the SOS Survival Fund at 838 South Court Street, Montgomery, Alabama 36104; or call 334-262-0932; or visit on Facebook.

Sheriff announces $485,968.83 distribution for December from bingo gaming

On Wednesday January 27, 2021, Greene County Sheriff’s Department reported a total distribution of $485,968.83 from four licensed bingo gaming operations in the county. The bingo distributions were contributed by Frontier, River’s Edge, Palace and Bama Bingo. Greenetrack distributed an additional $71,000 separately as reported previously.
The recipients of the December distributions from bingo gaming include the Greene County Commission, Greene County Sheriff’s Department, the cities of Eutaw, Forkland, Union, Boligee, the Greene County Board of Education and the Greene County Hospital (Health System).
Sub charities include Children’s Policy Council, Guadalupan Multicultural Services, Greene County Golf Course, Branch Heights Housing Authority, Department of Human Resources and the Greene County Library.
Bama Bingo gave a total of $114,994.98 to the following: Greene County Commission, $30,570; Greene County Sheriff’s $33,750; City of Eutaw, $9,250; and the Towns of Forkland, Union and Boligee each, $3,875; Greene County Board of Education, $10,500, and the Greene County Health System, $12,500. Sub Charities, each received $1,133.33.
Frontier (Dream, Inc.) gave a total of $114,994.98 to the following: Greene County Commission, $30,570; Greene County Sheriff’s Department, $33,750; City of Eutaw, $9,250; and the Towns of Forkland, Union and Boligee each, $3,875; Greene County Board of Education, $10,500; Greene County Health System, $12,500. Sub Charities each, $1,333.33.
River’s Edge (Next Level Leaders and Tishabee Community Center Tutorial Program) gave a total of $114,994.98 to the following: Greene County Commission, $30,570; Greene County Sheriff’s Department, $33,750; City of Eutaw, $9,250; and the Towns of Forkland, Union and Boligee each, $3,875; Greene County Board of Education, $10,500; Greene County Health System, $12,500. Sub Charities each, $1,333.33.
Palace (TS Police Support League) gave a total of $140,983.89 to the following: Greene County Commission, $37,478.82; Greene County Sheriff’s Department, $41,377.50; City of Eutaw, $11,340.50; and the Towns of Forkland, Union and Boligee each, $4,750.75; Greene County Board of Education, $12,873 and the Greene County Health System, $15,325; Sub Charities each, 1,389.47.

Newswire: Algerians renew demand for French apology for colonial era crimes

Algerian protests for French apology


 
Jan. 25, 2021 (GIN) – Time marches on but murderous crimes committed during war may demand an apology regardless of the number of years that elapsed since the crimes took place.
 
Such is the current case presented by Algerians who have renewed their demand for an apology for colonialization and the crimes against humanity that took place during Algeria’s war of independence from 1954-1962. This follows the much-anticipated release of a government-sponsored report by the historian Benjamin Stora.
 
Stora, an Algerian-born historian and expert on North Africa, is considered one of the world’s leading authorities on Algerian history.
 
The forgetting of the Algerian war that left at least 400,000 Algerians and 35,000 French dead began well before the fighting ended in 1962. The French made routine use of torture, for instance — but censors hid much of it from the populace, seizing newspapers, books and films deemed dangerous to national morale.
 
Only in 1999 did France officially recognize the fighting as a war at all, and only since then has the conflict entered school textbooks here.
 
French President Emmanuel Macron has gone further than his predecessors in recognizing the scale of abuses by France in the North African country, notes news service France24. While campaigning for president in 2017, for example, he called the colonization of Algeria a “crime against humanity.”
 
A year later, he acknowledged that France had instigated a system that facilitated torture during the 8-year long liberation war, which ended 132 years of French rule.
 
It was a startling admission in a country where the colonization of Algeria is seen as benign and many are opposed to the idea of repentance.
 
President Macron has offered to take symbolic acts to reconcile the two countries, but not the Algerian request for an apology – a decision which disappointed and angered Algerian nationals.
 
“We still haven’t taken the full measure of how much this war, this history, this French presence in Algeria, has marked and traumatized French society like a bitter family secret,” Stora said. “Everything — everything — stems from Algeria.”
 
Algerians and North African Arabs constitute France’s largest immigrant population by far, making a confrontation with the past all the more uncomfortable and pressing, he said.
 
In a statement issued this week, President Macron’s office said he would create a Memories and Truth Commission as recommended. In addition, three ceremonies to be organized by the French government in 2021 and 2022 will pay tribute to Algerians who fought on opposite sides of the war and to the agreement that led to Algeria’s independence in 1962.
 
In 2022, the country will mark the 60th anniversary of its independence from France.
 

Newswire: Baseball icon Henry ‘Hank’ Aaron dies at 86

By Stacy M. Brown, NNPA Newswire Senior National Correspondent

Hank Aaron


Baseball’s recognized home run king and an African American hero, Henry “Hank” Aaron, has died at the age of 86.
Aaron, who broke Babe Ruth’s all-time home run record on April 8, 1974, was not just a baseball legend but a hero to superstars. “He’s the one man that I idolize more than myself,” the late boxing legend Muhammad Ali once said about Aaron.
While with the Atlanta Braves, Aaron tied Ruth’s mark of 714 homers on April 7. A day later, he slugged No. 715 against the Los Angeles Dodgers’ Al Downing.
Before and throughout his chase of Ruth’s longstanding record, Aaron was subjected to racism and hate. Death threats were common, and even some teammates and those throughout baseball despised Aaron as he approached their white hero’s record.
Despite beefed up security at Atlanta’s Fulton County Stadium, some fans breached the outfield walls as Aaron trotted around the bases following his record-setting dinger.
“A Black man is getting a standing ovation in the Deep South for breaking a record of an all-time baseball idol,” Dodgers announcer Vin Scully, who called the game, proclaimed as Aaron’s mother, family, and teammates greeted him at home plate.
Born Henry Louis Aaron on February 5, 1934, in a poor Black section of Mobile, Alabama, called “Down the Bay,” Hank Aaron was the third of eight children born to Estella and Herbert Aaron. Aaron’s father made his living as a tavern owner and a dry dock boilermaker’s assistant. Aaron and his family moved to the middle-class Toulminville neighborhood when he was eight years old.
Aaron, who became known as “Hammering Hank,” developed a strong affinity for baseball and football at a young age and focused more heavily on sports than his studies. During his freshman and sophomore years, he attended Central High School, a segregated high school in Mobile, where he excelled at football and baseball.
Aaron first starred in the Negro Leagues in 1952 and again in 1953, batting .366, with five home runs and 33 RBIs in 26 official games. He began his Major League Baseball career in 1954 with the Milwaukee Braves and spent 23 seasons as an outfielder with Milwaukee – the franchise eventually moved to Atlanta.
Aaron finished his career with 755 home runs, a record topped by Barry Bonds of the San Francisco Giants in 2007. However, many baseball purists recognize Aaron as the true record holder, alleging that Bonds used performance enhancing drugs to bolster his power.Bonds has denied those allegations.
Aaron’s biography at the Baseball Hall of Fame, where he earned induction in 1982, noted that he was “a consistent producer both at the plate and in the field, reaching the .300 mark in batting 14 times, 30 home runs 15 times, 90 RBI 16 times and captured three Gold Glove Awards enroute to 25 All-Star Game selections.” He also had over 3,000 hits during his MLBaseball career.
On the 25th anniversary of Aaron’s 715th home run, Major League Baseball created the Hank Aaron Award, given annually to the players with the best overall offensive performances in each league.
Aaron received the Presidential Medal of Freedom, the nation’s highest civilian award, from President George W. Bush in 2002.
According to the New York Times, the Baseball Hall of Fame opened a permanent exhibit in 2009 chronicling Aaron’s life. His childhood home was moved on a flatbed truck to the grounds of Hank Aaron Stadium, which was the home of the Mobile BayBears, a former minor league team, and opened as a museum in 2010.
“Through his long career, Hank Aaron has been a model of humility, dignity, and quiet competence,” former Atlanta Mayor and U.S. Ambassador Andrew Young noted in a statement. “He did not seek the adoration that is accorded to other national athletic heroes, yet he has now earned it. ”

Newswire: Biden Administration revives plan to put Harriet Tubman in her rightful place on $20 bill

Harriet Tubman on $20 bill

By: Charise Frazier, NewsOne


After four years of stalling, the push to replace Andrew Jackson’s image with Harriet Tubman‘s is being revisited, according to Biden Press Secretary Jen Psaki.
“The Treasury department is taking steps to resume efforts to put Harriet Tubman on the front of the new $20 notes. It’s important that our notes—our money—people don’t know what a note is—reflect the history and diversity of our country and Harriet Tubman’s image gracing the new $20 note would certainly reflect that,” Psaki said during a White House press briefing on Monday.
A timeline would be revealed by the Treasury Department. Janet Yellen, Biden’s nominee to head the department who was confirmed by the Senate on Monday on sworn-in by Vice-President Biden on Tuesday.
In 2019 New York Senator Chuck Schumer ordered an investigation into the delay of placing Tubman on the bill which would replace Jackson, the country’s seventh president and a known slave owner.
Prior to Schumer’s probe order Treasury Secretary Steve Mnuchin testified on Capitol Hill, revealing that the imagery replacement would not occur until sometime in 2028. He blamed the delay on the implementation of security grades to the $5 and $10 as priority.
The move to place Tubman on the $20 bill was one of the last implementations of the Obama-era. In 2916 Obama announced the intention to make Tubman the face of the bill as a tribute to the abolitionist who risked her life and freedom to free her fellow slaves out of bondage.
The switch to Tubman’s imagery was intended to take place in 2020 to coincide with the 100th anniversary of women gaining the right to vote. If the plan is executed Tubman would make history as the first African-American to be honored on American currency.
However, as Trump took office he made it painfully clear in undoing most of Obama’s policies that Tubman replacing Jackson was off the table, claiming that he intended to keep Jackson on the currency in place of “political correctness,” stating that Jackson was one of his American heroes.
The Black delegation has been patiently waiting for Harriet to take her rightful place on American currency for the last five years. There’s no time like the present to make it happen as the country moves to hold the new administration accountable on its promises to help elevate the lives of Black people in America on several fronts.

School board acts to secure Birdine school property, anticipating sale to Town of Forkland

Shown above former Birdine School in Forkland, AL

The Greene County Board of Education met in a virtual meeting, Tuesday, January 19, 2021with all board members in attendance. The sale of the former Birdine school property to the Town of Forkland was among the superintendent’s recommendations approved by the board.
In preparation for this sale, the board had to certify to the State Superintendent of Education that any funds derived from this sale will be used for public school purposes and that it is to the benefit of the Greene County School District that Birdine School Property be sold.
According to school board legal counsel, Attorney Hank Sanders, years ago county boards of education could not own real property. School property had to be in the name of the State of Alabama. The Birdine School Property was in this category and even after boards of education could own real property, property owned by the state remained with the state.
“The Greene County Board of Education is now working to get the Birdine School Property out of the state and in the Greene County Board of Education by authorizing the superintendent and board president to execute the necessary documents of certification as required by the Alabama State Department of Education, ” Attorney Sanders stated. According to Superintendent Dr. Corey Jones, the Town of Forkland is prepared to purchase the Birdine School Property when all state requirements are met.
In his report, Superintendent Jones noted that the total positive coronavirus cases among school personnel is 18 and to date the total that reportedly have been exposed/isolated/quarantined is 40. He assured the board the all school facilities are thoroughly cleaned and sanitized daily.
Jones provided updates on the maintenance and repairs associated with various school facilities, including an update on the new roofing project at the central office.
The following personnel items were approved by the board:
Maternity Leave for Kalyn Bryant, Science Teacher, Robert Brown Middle School, effective January 4, 2021.
Employment of Angela Taylor, Long-term Substitute Science Teacher, Robert Middle School; and Milton Jones, Greene County Board Maintenance Department.
Retirement of Atausha Tinker-Mitchell, effective January 7, 2021.
Rescind employment of Latonya Taylor, Special Needs Teacher, Robert Brown Middle School. She did not accept position.
The board approved the following administrative service items:
Sale of Birdine Elementary School to the Town of Forkland.
Payment of all bills, claims, and payroll.
Approval for the Extension of the Families First Coronavirus Response ACT (FFCRA) Leave until March 31, 2021.
Ms. Lavonda Blair, CSFO, presented the following financial snapshot for the period ending November 30, 2020: General Fund Bank Balance – $1,124,226.97; Accounts Payable Check Register – $450,615.36; Payroll Register – $815,656.88; Combined Fund Balance – $4,424,586.70; Local Revenue: Property/Sales Taxes – $136,055.01; Bingo – $57, 873; Total Local Revenue – $193,928.01

Greene County celebrates Dr. ML King’s birthday, January 15 & 18

Mr. Spiver Gordon and Rev. James Carter present Certificate of Appreciation to Mr. J.B. Washington of Tishabee. Shown seated L to R: Ms. Amy Wiggins; Eutaw Mayor, Latasha Johnson; Eutaw Councilperson, Ms. Valarie Watkins.
Spiver Gordon and Rev. James Carter present Certificate of Appreciation to Mr. & Mrs. David McIntosh and son of Eutaw.
Gordon and Carter present Certificate of Appreciation to Ms. Kathy Morrow of Mantua.
Gordon and Carter present Certificate of Appreciation to Ms. Theresa Carpenter of Eutaw.
Ms. Thelma Washington of Eutaw displays her Certificate of Appreciation,