Annual Christmas Parade features floats, bands, horseback riders and decorative town square

Judge Julia Spree served as Grand  Marshall for the 2018 Christmas Parade

Thursday, December 6, 2018 marked the annual Greene County Christmas Parade sponsored by the Eutaw Area Chamber of Commerce. Probate Judge Julia Spree served as Grand Marshall. This year’s theme: All Hearts United for Christmas. Christmas is not as much about opening our presents as opening our hearts.
The Old Courthouse Square in the center of town was creatively adorned in Christmas and holiday decor letting you know Christmas is right around the corner.
Other local officials participating in the parade, local businesses and organizations sponsoring floats included: Greene County Sheriff Jonathan Benison leading the parade; GCHS JROTC; Miss Homecoming, Miss and Mr. GCHS and court; the GCHS Marching Band; Eutaw City Councilwoman Latasha Johnson, Town of Boligee Councilwomen; Christian Lighthouse School; Debutantes sponsored by Greene County Alumnae Chapter of Delta Sigma Theta Sorority, Inc.; the Volunteer Fire Departments of Mantua-Lewiston and Tishabee, Boligee as well as the Eutaw City Fire Department; New Generation Church. The horse riders closed out the parade.
The winners of the contest for best Store Front decoration are as follow: 1st Place – Banks & Company; 2nd Place – Eutaw City Hall; 3rd Place – Spiller’s Furniture Company. Child Choice Award was awarded to the Greene County Sheriff Department.
Float Winners include 1st Place – Christian Light House; 2nd Place – Merchant & Farmers Bank; 3rd Place – Town of Boligee. Honorable Mention- Eutaw Primary.
Following the lighting of the Christmas tree, Eutaw Primary students sang several Christmas Carols on the square as proud parents looked on.
Ms. Beverly Gordon, President of the Eutaw Area Chamber of Commerce, along with a committee of Chamber members and other volunteers organized the Christmas Parade and related events. Numerous businesses decorated their store fronts lifting that old saying: Its beginning to look a lot like Christmas.

SOS youth leaders and others call for boycott of all Hoover businesses until Hoover officials release full videotape and charge off-duty police officer for killing innocent Army Veteran E.J. Bradford

SOS Members and supporters at Montgomery press conference calling for boycott of Galleria Mall. Frank Matthews at podium. L. to R. Jeffrey Jones, Clarence Muhammad, Gus Townes and Alecha Irby
Family of man killed by Hoover Police after Galleria shooting speak, demand answers

Montgomery, AL – SOS youth leaders along with other youth leaders from across the state and other leaders held a news conference at the Alabama State House at 10:30 a.m. today calling for continued protests and a boycott of ALL Hoover businesses until Hoover city officials release the complete videotape of the killing of Army Veteran E.J. Bradford and criminally charge the off-duty Hoover police officer with killing Bradford.
Alecha Irby, head of the Youth Committee for the Save OurSelves Movement for Justice and Democracy and a student at Miles Law School, organized the Montgomery press conference to draw greater attention to the ongoing injustices taking place in Jefferson County. Irby said, “Twenty-one-year-old E.J. Bradford was shot and killed at the Galleria on November 22nd, and the Hoover police still have not released the full video of the killing. They have selectively chosen to release a 30-second snippet of the video, but their refusal to release the entire footage is more telling than the tiny segment they did release.”
An off-duty Hoover police officer shot and killed an innocent Army veteran. Hoover officials continue to refuse to release the full video and other critical information. Autopsy details revealed that Mr. Bradford was shot multiple times in the back and in the back of the head. “Officials in Hoover have not taken the first step to arrest the officer for this wrongful killing. Until they release the full tape and arrest the officer for the killing of Mr. Bradford, we are calling on everyone to boycott all businesses in Hoover.”

“Hoover officials have had the opportunity to do what is right and to seek justice for the family of Mr. Bradford. They continue to refuse to do so,” said Carlos Chaverst, Jr., who organized protests in Hoover in the aftermath of the brutal killing of E.J. Bradford. “Nineteen days have passed since the Hoover officer shot and killed Mr. Bradford, and the killer still walks free. We also do not have the full video footage of what took place at the Galleria, and officials have given no justifiable reason for not releasing that footage. We are here today to demand justice for E.J. Bradford, and we will not stop until justice is done,” he said.
“We are calling on a boycott of all Hoover businesses – not only those at the Galleria – until Hoover officials do what is right and just and release the entire video footage and other records related to the case and charge the officer with killing E.J. Bradford. Alabama has been witness to racial injustices throughout its history, and what is taking place in Hoover today is a new Civil Rights Movement,” said Frank Matthews of the Outcast Voters League.
“Some commentators have said just this week that these protests are taking place ‘before anybody really outside of witnesses and law enforcement knows what happened’ and have cited the 30-second video release as if it were a concrete action. If the police would release the full video and other necessary information including witness statements to the public, the police officer who killed Bradford would already be arrested and in custody and the protests and boycott could end. Observations like the one by an Alabama commentator I just referenced only serve to reinforce how little is being done to ensure the right actions are taken and justice is served.”

Hundreds attend celebration of Senator Hank Sanders 35 years of service in Alabama Legislature

More than 300 people from around the state attended a program on

Passing the Torch Ceremony L to R are: Attorney Faya Rose Toure, Attorney Malika Sanders Fortier, Senator Hank Sanders, Askhari Little and Attorney Ainka Sanders Jackson

Saturday, November 17, 2018, to celebrate and honor the 35 years of service by Senator Hank Sanders in the Alabama State Legislature. The program was held at the Wallace Community College in Selma, Alabama.
Sixty speakers, dancers, poets, musicians and others spoke and offered tributes on the program which culminated in a ceremony passing the torch of leadership from Hank to his daughter, Maliki Sanders Fortier. She was elected as Senator from the 23rd District of Alabama, comprising ten counties surrounding Selma, in the Alabama Black Belt, in the November 6th General Election, to succeed her father.

Carol P. Zippert, School Board member from Greene County and Co-Publisher of the Greene County Democrat gave the occasion for the program. She said the program was, “ to honor Senator Hank Sanders as a spiritual soldier for justice, visionary and institution builder in the Alabama Black Belt.”
A number of Hank’s colleagues from the Legislature came and gave tributes to Hank’s ability, friendship and moving the state, not just Black people, but the state as a whole, forward in a more just and equitable way.
Former Lieutenant Governor George McMillan praised Hank for his struggles as a young man, which led him to be more concerned about the welfare of others than himself. He said Hank lived by the dictum, his mother taught him, “Take what you have, To make what you need”. He lives his life asking people, “to turn to each other and not on each other.
Jimmy Baker, a former State Finance Director, Senator Little, Senator Lowell Barron, Senator Roger Bedford and others called Senator Hank Sanders a champion of public education, dedicated to an equitable funding of public education which helped poor rural counties Black and white in the state. All said that they were honored and humbled to work with Hank and that they learned a lot from him in all of their interactions with him both political and personal.
Senators Roger Smitherman and Linda Coleman of Birmingham, two African-American colleagues praised Hank for welcoming them in the Legislature and helping them to learn the process in Montgomery of how to pass legislation. Smitherman said, “ I want to do everything I can to help Malika Fortier when she joins us in the Senate.”
Former Commissioner of Agriculture Ron Sparks said that Hank Sanders was always, “Honest and courageous; a man of vision and hope. I traveled the world with Hank and Rose, to India, Cuba and other places and it was always a great experience, especially learning other people and cultures.”
Many local African-American officials including Congresswoman Terri Sewell, School Superintendents and Board members, County Commissioners recognized Senator Hank Sanders for guiding and advising them on difficult decisions and situations that helped them in their careers and personal lives.
Joe Reed, leader of the Alabama Democratic Conference (ADC) said that he and Hank did not agree on all things but that he knew that “Hank never forgot who the real enemy was of the people of Alabama – poverty and injustice – so they could often work together to fight the real enemies of the people of Alabama.”
David White, a former reporter for the Birmingham News and now an aide to Governor Kay Ivey praised Hank Sanders for his persistence and raising important issues like the Moratorium on the Death Penalty, which even though not enacted raised aw3areness and consciousness on important issues.

John Zippert, Co Publisher of the Greene County Democrat recognized Hank Sanders for his work on the Pigford Class Action lawsuits for Black farmers; his work with the Alabama New South Coalition and for writing a weekly column, Senate Sketches, for more than 30 years. “ I am proud to say the Greene County Democrat has published each of the 1,640 weekly columns and we will continue publishing his column although it will now be called Sketches, since the author has retired from the Alabama State Senate.”
Members of the Senator’s family including siblings, wife Faya Rose, his children and grandchildren also gave various tributes.

At the end of the program there was a ceremony of passing the torch of leadership and responsibility to the community from Senator Hank Sanders to his daughter, Malika Sanders Fortier. The ceremony was symbolical of the transfer of Hank Sanders duties and role in the Alabama Legislature to his successor.

Greene County Deltas observe World Aids Day; Commission Chairperson signs Proclamation

 

Observing the signing of the World Aids Day Proclamation for Greene County by Commission Chairperson Tennyson Smith are L to R seated: Nancy Cole and Isaac Atkins. Standing L to R: Johnni Strode Morning, Andrea Perry, Alfretta Crawford and Carol P. Zippert.

The Greene County Alumnae Chapter of Delta Sigma Theta Sorority, Inc., in conjunction with the Greene County Commission, observed World Aids Day in Greene County, December 1, 2018. In its meeting held Monday, November 26, 2018, the Commission approved the proposed proclamation and proclaimed Dec. 1 as World Aids Day. The official signing was held Friday, November 30, 2018. World Aids Day began 30 years ago on December 1, 1988, when the world health ministers called for a spirit of social tolerance and greater awareness of HIV Internationally. World Aids Day continues to be an important way to celebrate the extraordinary advances we have made in the battle against HIV and to remind Greene County residents and people everywhere that HIV has not gone away. In keeping with the 2018 World Aids Day theme Know Your Status members of the Greene County Alumnae Chapter of Delta Sigma Theta Sorority, Inc. encourage those living with HIV to ensure that they are linked to quality care and prevention services.

Newswire:  Global Citizens Fest honors Mandela legacy amidst huge crowd of Beyonce fans

Dec. 3, 2018 (GIN) – A massive turnout of die-hard fans of superstars Beyonce and her husband Jay-Z filled every available square inch of the Johannesburg FNB stadium for the closing night of the Global Citizen Festival organized to honor the 100th anniversary of the birth of Nelson Mandela and raise $1 billion to address poverty, food security, global health and other social issues. Beyonce and Jay-Z were the headline act for the standing room only closing affair that featured a 90 minute performance with the popular superstars that included a rendition of her 2008 single “Halo” accompanied by a South African choir. Those watching the show online, which also included appearances by Oprah Winfrey, Usher, Trevor Noah and Naomi Campbell, were only allowed to see 25 minutes of the two hour-plus set which caused bitter complaints across social media. Among the highlights of the free-ticketed event was a promise by billionaire Patrice Motsepe to give $250 million to support farming and agriculture in South Africa. Other major partners include Johnson & Johnson, Cisco, Nedbank, Vodacom, Big Concerts, House of Mandela, Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation Goalkeepers, Eldridge Industries, and Associate Partner, HP. “Global Citizens have generated commitments and policy announcements from leaders valued at over $37.9 billion that are set to affect the lives of more than 2.25 billion people. This year alone Global Citizens have secured 29 commitments totaling over $2.9 billion that are set to affect the lives of more than 501 million people by 2030,” organizers reported. As the exhausted fans left the stadium, however, joy turned to horror as the perimeter of the area was at a standstill with major traffic congestion, lack of public transportation and an absence of security, allowing robberies, violence and complete disorder to flourish. Much of this was documented on social media. Concert-goer and witness Catherine Constantinides, director of the Miss Earth SA program, said “it was more than mugging and taking phones”. “You prayed with your life not to be stabbed, punched or brutally attacked, all of which I witnessed,” she wrote on her verified Twitter account. The charity event also left a worrying question to be answered. Who would administer the giant sums promised – the government or the donors? An answer to that question should be forthcoming.

Newswire:  U.S. Senate’s only Black Republican blocks Tom Farr from becoming a Federal judge

 By Lauren Victoria Burke, NNPA Newswire Correspondent

Senator Tim Scott

On November 29, the U.S. Senate’s only African American Republican Senator, Tim Scott, announced he would oppose the nomination of Thomas Farr to a lifetime appointment to the federal bench. Scott’s blockbuster decision ended the chance of Farr’s nomination being confirmed by the U.S. Senate. Scott cited, “lingering concerns” on “issues that could affect [Farr’s] decision-making process as a federal judge.” “This week, a Department of Justice memo written under President George H.W. Bush was released that shed new light on Mr. Farr’s activities. This, in turn, created more concerns. Weighing these important factors, this afternoon I concluded that I could not support Mr. Farr’s nomination,” said Scott. The decision marked the second time Scott has blocked a Trump nominee to the federal bench. “Thomas Farr was the most polarizing, dangerous and biased nominee that we have seen put forth by President Trump. We applaud Senator Tim Scott for exercising independence in the examination of Farr’s disturbing record; a record influenced by the modern white supremacist machine that former North Carolina senator Jesse Helms pioneered, and one that demonstrated bias and a commitment to defending voter suppression efforts at every turn,” stated Kristen Clarke, President of the Lawyers’ Committee for Civil Rights Under Law. “Farr was the primary coordinator of the 1984 ‘ballot security’ program conducted by the 1984 Helms for Senate Committee. He coordinated several ‘ballot security’ activities in 1984, including a postcard mailing to voters in predominantly black precincts which was designed to serve as a basis to challenge voters on election day. Footnote 7, DOJ Memo, June 19, 1991. This revelation is singularly disqualifying,” wrote NAACP President Derrick Johnson. Sen. Scott’s decision was a dramatic one. A day before on November 28, he was nowhere to be found shortly before a vote to continue debate on the Farr nomination. Other Senators, as well as reporters, searched for Scott near the Senate floor before that procedural vote. Many assumed his support of moving the debate to a final vote meant he would support Farr’s nomination. That assumption was incorrect. Sen. Scott was joined by Senators Marco Rubio (R-FL), Susan Collins (R-ME) and Lisa Murkowski (R-AK) in wondering out loud about whether Farr should be on the federal bench. But Sen. Scott was the only one to announce he would vote against Farr on the floor.

Commission commits $126,000 for new equipment; Chairman makes committee assignments

County personnel view demonstration model of excavator equipment approved by Commission.

The Greene County Commission met in a specially called meeting, Monday, November 26, 2018 to handle some business matters that were not dealt with at the re-organizational meeting the prior week. The commissioners approved a request by County Engineer, Willie Branch, to purchase a mini excavator with mulcher attachment at a cost of approximately $126,000. According to Mr. Branch, this will replace the county’s Boom Mower. Branch indicated that he expects the equipment to arrive by the first of the year. Commission Chairperson, Tennyson Smith, issued committee assignments for each commissioner: Commissioner Lester Brown will chair the Education Committee; Commissioner Corey Cockrell will chair the Highway/Solid Waste Committee; Commissioner Roshanda Summerville will chair the Personnel Committee; Commissioner Allen Turner, Jr. will chair the Industry and Public Health Committee; and Commissioner Smith will chair the Finance/Public Safety Committee. In other business the Commission acted on the following: * Approved letter of support for Greene County Industrial Authority. * Approved Proclamation for World Aids Day, Dec. 1, 2018 for the Greene County * Alumnae Chapter of Delta Sigma Theta Sorority, Incorporated. * Approved replacement of HVAC unit at Activity Center ( Extension offices). * Approved ABC License for Tobacco Permit for Dollar General store in Clinton, AL. * Approved Dec. 31, 2018 as an additional county holiday for this year. * Approved 2019 county holiday schedule. * Approved Ratification of Chairman’s actions regarding resolution for Alabama Workers’ Compensation Self Insurers Fund. * Approved following employee travel request: Licensing Clerk to attend Licensing Conference in Prattville, Jan.16-17, 2019; CFO to attend Annual Governmental & Accounting Forum, Dec. 6-7, 2018 in Hoover, AL; CFO to attend Continuing Education in Bessemer, Dec. 11-12, 2018; H.R. Personnel to attend Legislative Conference, Dec. 4-6, 2018 in Montgomery; Board of Registrars to attend Registrar’s Conference Nov. 16 in Montgomery. The meeting was officially adjourned.

Newswire : Vanishing Joshua Trees: Climate Change will ravage US National Parks, study says

 By Emily Holden, Guardian UK

 

Joshua Tree National Park

America’s national parks have warmed twice as fast as the US average and could see some of the worst effects of climate change, according to a new study. Most of Joshua Tree National park could become uninhabitable for its eponymous trees, glaciers will continue to melt away at Glacier national park, and many other of America’s most treasured beauty spots could be rendered virtually unrecognizable by climate change, Patrick Gonzalez, the lead author of the study, writes in the journal Environmental Research Letters. Even the tiniest of creatures are at risk in the worst-case predictions: the American pika, a small alpine mammal, may no longer be able to survive on park land. “We are preserving the most remarkable ecosystems, and they happen to be in extreme environments,” said Gonzalez, a climate scientist at the University of California, Berkeley. Gonzalez is also the principal climate change scientist for the US National Park Service but conducted and spoke about the research in his university capacity. The study finds that temperatures in national parks could go up 3 to 9C by 2100, under the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change’s worst-case scenario, which shows what could happen without policies to decrease greenhouse gas pollution. With lower emissions, temperatures could still increase more than 2C (3.6F) for 58% of park land, compared to 22% of the US as a whole, according to the study. They are particularly vulnerable because most US park land is in areas that are heating up quicker: in the mountains, the Arctic and the dry south-west. Alaska parks would see the most extreme heat increases, and the US Virgin Islands parks face 28% less rainfall by the end of the century. In Glacier Bay national park, the Muir Glacier melted 640 meters between 1948 and 2000. In Yellowstone national park, trees are dying because bark beetles are thriving in warmer winters. Yellowstone will also become far more vulnerable to wildfires. The area burned could be up to three to 10 times higher by 2100. Joshua Tree national park in California could lose up to 90% of the habitat suitable for its namesake trees. Gonzalez explained that parks at a higher elevation have a thinner atmosphere that warms faster. Higher temperatures are also melting snow cover and making the ground darker so that it absorbs more heat. Parks in California and the south-west US have seen both high temperatures and record-low rainfall, he said. The research is the first comprehensive look at climate change impacts on national parks, Gonzalez said. He said he has been using the climate impacts research to develop plans for parks to adapt and reduce the greenhouse gas pollution they contribute. The Trump administration has rescinded government efforts to slow climate change. The interior department, where the National Park Service is housed, nixed a policy that would have urged management decisions based on science, including climate change research. Park officials in New England scrubbed references to climate change and flooding risks in a report this summer, according to Reveal. The National Park Service did not immediately respond to a request to comment on the study or climate change policies for parks. Jonathan Jarvis, the National Park Service director under Barack Obama who now works at UC Berkeley, said he relied on climate change projections to decide where to relocate and bolster structures in the Everglades national park in Florida, an area that has been hit by hurricanes and faces sea-level rise. Jarvis said he worries that under Trump parks won’t be able to plan long-term for climate change. “The park service manages these assets, these places, for the benefit of the American people, and they should be based on the best available sound science in the long-term public interest, not for some short-term political agenda,” Jarvis said.

Newswire :  Questions remain in Alabama mall shooting

 By Kim Chandler / The Associated Press

Galleria Mall protestors

HOOVER, AL — The father of a Black man killed by a police officer during a shooting at an Alabama mall said his son had a permit to carry a gun for self-defense, adding it was hurtful police initially portrayed his son as the shooter. Emantic “EJ” Bradford Jr., 21, was fatally shot by the officer responding to the Thanksgiving night shooting that wounded an 18-year-old man and a 12-year-old female bystander. Hoover police initially said they thought Bradford, who was carrying a handgun, was responsible but later retracted that statement. They subsequently said it was unlikely that Bradford had done the shooting. Bradford’s father, Emantic Bradford Sr., speaking Saturday night with The Associated Press, said the family wants to know if there is police body camera footage from the shooting. Police have not confirmed to AP whether such footage exists. Hoover Police Captain Gregg Rector said investigators now believe that more than two people were involved in the initial fight ahead of the shooting, and that “at least one gunman” is still at large who could be responsible. Police said while Bradford Jr. “may have been involved in some aspect of the altercation, he likely did not fire the rounds that wounded the 18-year-old victim.” Rector said police regret that their initial statement about Bradford was not accurate and added the shooting remains under investigation. About 200 demonstrators marched Saturday evening through the Riverchase Galleria mall in suburban Birmingham. Bradford’s father called his son “a good kid, a very good kid.” Bradford Sr. said his son had a permit to carry a weapon in self-defense. He said he doesn’t know exactly what happened at the mall but added: “They were so quick to rush to judgment. … I knew my son didn’t do that. People rushed to judgment. They shouldn’t have done that.” Hoover police said Friday morning that the girl was in stable condition.

Newswire:  Oral arguments scheduled for HBCU-Maryland inequality case

By Stacy M. Brown, NNPA Newswire Correspondent @StacyBrownMedia

Students at Maryland HBCU’s protest

A coalition of HBCU students, alumni and others from Maryland are planning to pack the Fourth District Circuit U.S. Court of Appeals in Richmond, Virginia next month for oral arguments in a decades-old lawsuit over inequality in public higher education. “We are reaching out and calling on at least 200 HBCU supporters to join us in Richmond on Dec. 11,” said HBCU Matters Chairman, Marvin “Doc” Cheatham. The coalition has chartered buses to leave from each of the four HBCU campuses in Maryland on the morning of the arguments. “The students are very actively advocating on behalf of all four of the HBCUs in Maryland. Morgan State has held two rallies thus far and the University of Maryland Eastern Shore had their Rally Saturday the 17th,” said Zattura Sims-El, one of many advocates for HBCUs in Maryland. “Bowie and Coppin are currently planning rallies for each campus. The students from all four universities are communicating with each other for one purpose and that is the have Gov. Hogan withdraw the appeal, he and only he has the power and authority to do so,” Sims-El said. A coalition of alumni from Maryland’s four HBCUs have been involved in a lawsuit since 2006 with the state. Coalition members argue that Maryland has underfunded Morgan State University, Coppin State University, Bowie State University and the University of Maryland Eastern Shore, and allowed other state schools to duplicate their programs, placing pressure on enrollment. Published reports suggest that over the years, the coalition has called for increased funding and merging the University of Baltimore with Morgan State, the state’s largest public historically black school, to achieve parity. A year ago, a federal judge asked the state to remedy the lack of investment in Maryland’s HBCUs, ordering the state to establish a set of new, unique and high-demand programs at each historically black institution, the judge declared. Despite that court order, settlement talks have stalled, and Maryland hasn’t accepted the court-ordered remedies for HBCUs. “While the Maryland HBCU case is still in mediation, due to the State’s refusal to accept the judge’s ruling, the Maryland HBCU Matters Coalition is hard at work,” Cheatham said. In 2013, Judge Catherine Blake, U.S. District Court of Maryland, found the state in violation of 14th Amendment rights of its HBCU students and alumni. Her ruling said Maryland continues to operate vestiges of a de jure system of segregation, specifically by continuing a longstanding practice of duplicating academic programs offered at HBCU’s, rather than investing in making the HBCU programs attractive to a diverse range of students. By June 2017, after initial failed mediation between HBCU advocates and the state of Maryland, Blake ordered parties back into court. In November of 2017, Blake reportedly issued an order providing for an administrator known as a special master to coordinate a comprehensive plan ensuring Maryland’s HBCU’s would be home to high quality academic programs. “The Plan should propose a set of new unique and/or high demand programs at each HBI, taking into account each HBI’s areas of strength, physical building capacity and the programmatic niches suggested by the plaintiff’s experts,” Blake wrote in the November 2017 ruling. According to The Afro, which has covered the story more extensively than any other media outlet, in December 2017, state Attorney General Brian Frosh gave notice that the state would appeal Blake’s ruling.

Frosh, who in prior years urged a mediated resolution to the long-standing HBCU lawsuit, attempted to explain why he’s now extending the legal battle. “It’s my job to defend the state when it gets sued,” Frosh told HBCU protestors who rallied outside his office in the months following the State’s appeal. In January, Gov. Larry Hogan, further complicated the State’s message toward HBCU’s by writing to Del. Cheryl Glenn, former chair of the Maryland Legislative Black Caucus (LBC), offering a $100 million-dollar settlement offer, according to The Afro. While the LBC supports HBCU advocates, the Caucus is not an official party to the lawsuit. Hogan’s $100 million proposal would be split between Bowie State University, Coppin State University, Morgan State University and the University of Maryland Eastern Shore, The Afro reported. His settlement offer stipulates a 10-year allocation period and relieves the State of responsibility for court costs. Each institution would receive approximately 2.5 million per school, per year. However, the estimated cost of the Coalition’s Plan to remedy the imbalance in quality academic programming offered at HBCU’s is in the $1-2 billion range. Hogan’s offer also falls short of the $500 million settlement between the State of Mississippi and plaintiffs representing Mississippi’s three public HBCU’s almost 20 years ago, back in 2001, ending higher education desegregation litigation dating back to the 1970’s in that state. “The decision by Frosh to appeal the decision from Federal District Court Judge Blake has elevated this issue to the US Court of Appeals for the 4th Circuit,” said Maryland advocate Brandon F. Cooper. “If that Appeals Court also upholds the District Court decision, Frosh could decide to appeal again and then it lands in the U.S Supreme Court. Any decision from the U.S Supreme Court would impact every HBCU, not just those in Maryland,” said Cooper, a member of the Maryland Republican Party Executive Committee. Cooper said the matter counts as a bipartisan issue and he brought the HBCU attorneys in to testify before the Republican Caucus in the Maryland legislature. “HBCUs have long enjoyed bipartisan support in states, Congress and the White House,” Cooper said. “However, President Donald Trump has sent mixed signals on his continuance of the historically bipartisan support of HBCUs,” he said.