Greene County schools postpone all extra-curricular activities

The Greene County Board of Education held an emergency meeting Tuesday, July 28, 2020 to take action on the superintendent’s recommendation regarding extra-curricular activities for the 2020-2021 school year.
Superintendent Dr. Corey Jones explained that the school system has already determined a three-phase opening for the coming school term and in efforts to keep the students, school personnel and community safe, the Greene County School System will operate its first phase virtually for the first nine weeks.
According to Jones, if it is unsafe to bring students together for classes, it is unsafe for students, faculty and others to gather for any extra-curricular activities, including football, cheerleading, dance, etc. He stated that as we progress through the school term, we will reassess the health condition of the local community and do what we must for the safety of all

Nine more arrested at Tuesday’s SOS protest for Medicaid Expansion at State Capitol in Montgomery

By: John Zippert,
Co-Publisher

The SaveOurselves Movement for Justice and Democracy (SOS) held its bi-weekly protest on the steps of the State Capitol in Montgomery, Alabama to call for Governor Kay Ivey to expand Medicaid; for state and federal officials to intensify their response to the coronavirus, especially by increasing testing, contact tracing and support for the Alabama Black Belt counties, and Black, Brown and poor communities, who are dying from the virus at disproportionately higher rates; releasing non-violent detainees from jails and prisons to reduce the spread of coronavirus and other concerns.

Nine people were arrested by the City of Montgomery Police when they began painting “Good Trouble” and “Expand Medicaid” over the light gray paint that the City had painted over “Black Lives Matter” and “Expand Medicaid” written by SOS protestors in a similar demonstration on July 16, 2020.
Fewer than half of those individuals were actually painting – or attempting to paint. Several were arrested for simply standing on the gray painted pavement in front of the Capitol that does not block any traffic. The police closed in and started making arrests before the protestors could complete writing full words.
The SOS protest yesterday, July 28, 2020, was also directed at the Mayor, Police Chief and staff of the City of Montgomery Police Department for their humiliating treatment of five SOS and Black Lives Matter activists who turned themselves in to the police on Monday, July 20, 2020. The two women were strip searched and all were required to dress in jail jumpsuits and were placed in holding cells. During their five hours in custody, they were exposed to the coronavirus by jailers and detainees, who were not wearing masks
The nine who were detained at Tuesday’s protest were SOS leaders and members as well as some supporters from the Southern Poverty Law Center (SPLC) and the Poor People’s Campaign for a Moral Revival. The nine arrested were: Hank Sanders, Selma attorney and former Alabama State Senator, Faya Rose Toure (Sanders), his wife and civil rights attorney, Martha Morgan, retired University of Alabama law professor, Queen Tate, Yomi Goodall and Judson Garner, SOS members; Ellen Degnan and Danna Sweeny with SPLC, and Stephanie Bernal-Martinez with the Poor People’s Campaign.
All who were arrested on Tuesday, were released in a span of two hours on their own recognizance. One White male was made to strip down to his underwear and put on a prison jumpsuit. No-one in custody was strip searched this time. At press time it is not clear what charges will be brought against the nine who were arrested.
The five SOS and BLM activists, Karen Jones, Faya Rose Toure, Johnny Ford, John Zippert, and Kamasi Amin (Juan McFarland II ) were charged with “defacing public property”, a misdemeanor, for the early incident of writing in the street. They have been assigned a September 21st court date.
Attorney, Civil Rights Activist and former Municipal Judge Faya Rose Toure, who was the only person arrested at both protests, said: “My arrest and jailing on Monday was the most humiliating experience of my life. I have been arrested multiple times in various cities in this state and country over more than five decades in civil disobedience protests in the fight for human rights, but never was I strip searched and never was I exposed to danger like I was in Montgomery in the city jail.
“The five of us all wore masks, but none of the other inmates with whom we were held wore masks not nor did all of the jail employees. This is dangerous not only for us but also for our families and all those with whom we come in contact. In addition to being embarrassing and dangerous, it was also hurtful to me because I was almost arrested in Montgomery last year for passing out voting materials during the campaign in which Steven Reed was elected Mayor. But I intend to keep fighting for human rights. I intend to keep fighting to expand Medicaid. I intend to keep fighting to save lives in Alabama.”
“Former Tuskegee Mayor and State Representative Johnny Ford said: “We have been fighting for the expansion of Medicaid in Alabama year after year after year. Alabama must expand Medicaid to save lives in Alabama. Expanding Medicaid would save the lives of an estimated 700 Alabamians per year – and that is before the COVID-19 pandemic hit.”
Several parents of children murdered while in the custody of the City of Montgomery Police and Jail voiced their complaints about the injustices of the city’s jail and justice system. The parents of Steven Matthew Seal and Tony Lewis Jr. gave testimonies about the unfair treatment of their children.
Persons interested in joining or supporting SOS in future demonstration may contact SOS through their website, Facebook page or by writing: SOS Survival Fund, 838 So. Court Street, Montgomery, Alabama 36104; phone: 334-262-0932.

Rodney Wesley is a candidate for Eutaw City Council District 5

I am Rodney Wesley and I have been teaching and coaching for 25 years and now I want to do something that is just as important to me. This is another way to give back to my community as a public service. I feel that I know a lot about this community but there is so much more to learn. I think it’s my time and opportunity to step up and take my next Leadership Role as a Eutaw City Council Person. I am seeking District 5 Council Position.
I am a graduate of Eutaw High School, where I played football under Coach James E. Morrow and Coach Cleveland Austin. I attended the University of Alabama and earned a BS Degree and played basketball under Coach Wimp Sanderson.
I am a native of Greene County and following my college graduation I returned home to work in our school system. I have a special dedication to helping our youth prepare themselves to be the best that they can be. One of my goals is to restore and bring more recreational activities for our youth and elderly.
I will also strive to build a strong relationship with citizens within our city, as well as outside of Eutaw. I will work and walk along with everyone to make Eutaw a Great Place to Live.
My wife is Yvonne Wesley and I have six children. My parents are Hattie Wesley and Artie Atkins. I am a member of New Peace Missionary Baptist Church.
I am asking for your support and your vote on August 25 as your Eutaw City Councilperson District 5.

Newswire: John Lewis makes final crossing over Edmund Pettus Bridge in Selma

By Eric Velasco, The Washington Post

John Lewis casket crosses Selma bridge for last time
Congressman John Lewis casket

Fifty-five years ago, Alabama state troopers beat John Lewis and hundreds of protesters as they crossed Edmund Pettus Bridge. On Sunday, troopers saluted the late civil rights leader after he made his final journey across the span.
The body of the 17-term congressman was carried on a horse-drawn caisson from Brown Chapel A.M.E. Church to the bridge, where rose petals had been scattered. Two horses and a driver led the flag-draped casket, which paused a few minutes on the bridge above the Alabama River. On the other side, the words of “We Shall Overcome” could be heard as family, hundreds of onlookers and several troopers greeted Lewis.
A military honor guard moved the casket from the caisson to a hearse for the trip to Montgomery. Alabama state police were accompanying Lewis to the state capital.
“It is poetic justice that this time Alabama state troopers will see John to his safety,” Rep. Terri A. Sewell (D-Ala.) said.
The ceremony is the second day in six days of tributes to the son of sharecroppers, fighter for civil rights and lawmaker widely hailed as the conscience of Congress. Lewis (D-Ga.) died July 17 at the age of 80 after a six-month battle with pancreatic cancer.
The honors began Saturday in Lewis’s birthplace of Troy, Ala., with prayers, family recollections, songs and a plea to carry on his legacy of fighting for a more just society. It will end Thursday with a service at Ebenezer Baptist Church in Atlanta, where the Rev. Martin Luther King Jr. preached.
In between, Lewis will lie in state in two state capitols — Montgomery and Atlanta — and in the U.S. Capitol Rotunda, where the nation has paid tribute to past presidents, lawmakers and other distinguished citizens, including civil rights pioneer Rosa Parks in 2005.
Lewis’s crossing of the Edmund Pettus Bridge 55 years ago was a defining moment for a nation and the young activist. The ceremony on Sunday comes amid a national reckoning over systemic racism in the wake of the police killing of George Floyd, a black man, and weeks of protests nationwide.
On March 7, 1965, Lewis, then the 25-year-old chairman of the Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee, led about 600 protesters in a march across the bridge for civil rights. State troopers beat the demonstrators, and Lewis suffered a cracked skull on what became known as Bloody Sunday.
“I was hit in the head by a state trooper with a nightstick,” Lewis said decades later. “I really believe to this day that I saw death.”
Within months, President Lyndon B. Johnson signed the Voting Rights Act, which was meant to end the obstacles preventing black people from voting.
John Lewis nearly died on the Edmund Pettus Bridge. Now it may be renamed for him.
In subsequent years, Lewis has led an annual march of Republicans and Democrats, current and former presidents across the bridge. Most notably, in 2015 on the 50th anniversary of Bloody Sunday, he walked across the span with the nation’s first black president, Barack Obama; former president George W. Bush; and many of the foot soldiers of the 1960s movement.
“We just need to open our eyes and our ears and our hearts to know that this nation’s racial history still casts its long shadow upon us,” Obama said. “We know the march is not yet over; we know the race is not yet won. We know reaching that blessed destination where we are judged by the content of our character requires admitting as much.”
In the days after Lewis’s death, there have been renewed calls for Congress to act on voting rights and name the legislation in Lewis’s honor. In 2013, the Supreme Court invalidated a crucial component of the landmark law, ruling that Congress had not taken into account the nation’s racial progress when citing certain states for federal oversight.
The House passed legislation in December to restore those protections, but the bill has languished in the GOP-led Senate.
There also have been calls to rename the Edmund Pettus Bridge for Lewis. Pettus was a Confederate officer and a member of the Ku Klux Klan.
At the service at Troy University on Saturday, Lewis’s flag-draped casket was carried by men in masks, and attendees were seated six feet apart, a reminder that the country is still in the midst of the coronavirus pandemic, which has killed nearly 150,000 Americans, a disproportionate number from low-income, minority communities.
Lewis’s brother Freddie Lewis implored people to continue his legacy by voting. His sister Rosa Mae Tyner recalled that he “lived with the never-ending desire to help others.” Another brother, Henry “Grant” Lewis, said Lewis “would gravitate toward the least of us.”
The late congressman’s young great-nephew, Jaxon Lewis Brewster, called Lewis his “hero.” “It’s up to us to keep his legacy alive,” the 7-year-old said.
Henry Grant Lewis recalled his last conversation with his brother the night before he died. Lewis was, as always, concerned about others, asking how the family was doing and wanting his brother to tell them he’d asked about them.
Henry Grant Lewis also shared an exchange he’d had with his brother when he was first sworn in to Congress. The new lawmaker looked up at his family watching from the gallery above the House floor and flashed his brother a thumbs up. Afterward, Henry Grant Lewis asked his brother what he was thinking when he made that gesture. “I was thinking,” he recalled his brother saying, “this is a long way from the cotton fields of Alabama.”

COVID-19

As of July 22, 2020 at 10:20 AM
Alabama had 70,413 confirmed cases of coronavirus,
(14,000 more than last week) with 1,325 deaths (189 more than last week)
Greene County had 224 confirmed cases, 23 more cases than last week, with 9 deaths
Sumter Co. had 325 cases with 13 deaths
Hale Co. had 402 cases with 23 deaths

Five arrested at SOS protest at State Capitol for ‘defacing public property’ for painting ‘Black Lives Matter’ and ‘Expand Medicaid’ in street in front of Capitol

By: John Zippert,
Co-Publisher

Photo taken from a building across the street, showing “Black Lives Matter” and “Expand Medicaid” written in the street in front of State Capitol in Montgomery.

Four of the persons arrested (L to R in front row) Kumasi Amin, Faya Rose Toure, John Zippert, Karen Jones together with lawyers and supporters after release from jail; not shown Mayor Johnny Ford.

The City of Montgomery issued warrants for five participants in the Thursday, July 16, 2020, SOS protest on the steps of the State Capitol. The five were involved in spray painting the words “Black Lives Matter” and “Expand Medicaid” in the street in front of the State Capitol. They were not charged at the time, but subsequently over the weekend they were charged with “defacing public property” a misdemeanor by the City of Montgomery.

The five: former Mayor of Tuskegee, Johnny Ford, Attorney Fay Rose Toure of Selma, Karen Jones, Montgomery community activist, John Zippert, Co-Publisher of the Greene County Democrat and Chair of the Greene County Health Services Board of Directors, and Kumasi Amin (slave name Juan McFarland II), a Black Lives Matter member, voluntarily turned themselves in at Noon on Monday, July 20, 2020.
In discussions with the group’s lawyers, the group was assured that they would be released on signature recognizance bonds. Once in the hands of the Montgomery Police, the five were handcuffed and processed as common criminals under the arrest protocols of the Montgomery police. They were held for more than five hours, until their signature bonds were issued and approved by city and police officials.
The two women were strip searched and put in prison jump suits. The men had to surrender their shoes, pants, shirts and other possessions and were issued prison jump suits to wear. All five were photographed, fingerprinted and given a plastic armband. The three men were placed in a large holding cell with two other detainees.
The five SOS protesters, three of whom are over the age of 70, entered the jail wearing masks, to protect from exposure to the coronavirus. They were issued new masks once in the jail, however the other prisoners in the holding cell and some of the jailers were not wearing masks.
Mayor Johnny Ford said, “The police were trying to humiliate and intimidate us the whole time were there. Something I expected to take 15 minutes took more than five hours. They were trying to teach us a lesson.”
Faya Rose Toure said, “We were mistreated and misheard by the Montgomery Jail staff. Why was it necessary to strip search us and ask us to hold our butt cheeks and cough three times. Then they put us in a situation where we could have been exposed to the coronavirus. The saddest part was that all of the jailers were Black people, who basically had their jobs because of our civil rights activism from the 1960’s onwards.”
Karen Jones said, “We were treated disgracefully and exposed to the coronavirus all because we wrote some needed words on the streets of Montgomery. They also found a nine year old traffic violation for me and charged me with that as well. The Mayor, Police Chief and other Montgomery officials are more concerned about the pavement than the people of our city.”
Each of the protestors was given a September 21, 2020 court date to pay a $500 fine or argue their case before a city judge. They each had to pay a $35 fee for recording their signature appearance bond.
On Thursday, July 16, 2020, the Save Ourselves Movement for Justice and Democracy (SOS) conducted a protest on the steps of the Alabama State Capitol in Montgomery, Alabama. The protest was about several interrelated issues, including: ending police brutality and passage of the George Floyd Justice in Policing Act; highlighting the health disparities revealed by the coronavirus pandemic, which have contributed to the disproportional effects of the pandemic on Black, Brown and poor people; urging Governor Ivey and the Alabama State Legislature to expand Medicaid coverage under the Affordable Care Act, which would provide affordable health care coverage to more than 340,000 people in Alabama; supporting the release of non-violent prisoners in state and county prisons and jails, to prevent them from contracting the virus; and ending voter suppression by the State of Alabama and allowing every person to vote without barriers.
This was not the first time that SOS has held protests on the steps of the Alabama State Capitol. The organization has held these protests and caravans, every two weeks since the beginning of March 2020. Some of the protests have been also been held at the Governors Mansion and Montgomery Federal Courthouse.
John Zippert said, “I have attended each of these protests and spoke out at the press conferences specifically on behalf of Medicaid Expansion and Saving Rural Hospitals. At all of the protests, we have worn masks and gloves and stood stood at least six feet apart, following social distancing recommendations.
“ During the protest on Thursday, July 16, 2020, while some of our colleagues were “dying-in” on the Capitol Steps, a group of us, armed with yellow spray paint cans started writing: “Black Lives Matter” and “Expand Medicaid” in the street directly in front of the State Capitol. My hope was that Governor Ivey would see the writing and be prompted to take positive action on the demands of the protest.”
While the SOS members were writing in the street, they attracted a dozen or more Montgomery and State police. The police told them that they should stop writing in the street but did not physically stop them. They put hands on Karen Jones, an SOS leader and community activist, but did not stop her.
Zippert continued, “ A photograph with this story shows the writing in the street. I personally wrote the word “Expand” as part of Expand Medicaid. We did not have time to add “Now” at the end of Expand Medicaid.
“This is the third time in the past three years, that I have been arrested for civil disobedience in Montgomery, in connection with protesting for Medicaid Expansion. The first time was with an SOS group that held a prayer vigil inside the Alabama State Capitol for Medicaid Expansion; the second time was with a group connected with SOS and the Poor People’s Campaigned that poured catsup on the statue of Jefferson Davis, President of the Confederacy, which stands in front of the State Capitol. Both times we were acquitted by City Judges without fines or a criminal record.

“ During a week that we mourn the loss of Congressman John Lewis and Rev. C. T. Vivian, I feel good about getting into “good trouble” trying to change the recalcitrant policies of the State of Alabama.”

School Board approves three-phase plan to re-open schools, beginning with remote learning

Superintendent Dr. Corey Jones presented his long anticipated plan for reopening the county’s schools at the Greene County Board of Education’s monthly meeting held Monday, July 20, 2020, in a virtual setting, again observing safety measures due to the COVID-19 Pandemic.
The board approved the plan.
The three-phase plan proposes a Remote Learning Option in Phase 1, scheduled for August 20, to Oct. 16, 2020, covering the first nine weeks of school, where students will participate in courses remotely. Dr. Jones explained that the curriculum has been adjusted to accommodate this new approach, with teachers stationed in classrooms in respective schools guiding students through lessons remotely.
Jones noted that all students will be provided the devices necessary to access their courses remotely. The devices will be issued prior to August 20.
The board is also striving to provide access to the internet for all students, which includes providing hot spots, as well as connecting to appropriate towers in the rural communities. School buses can also be equipped with internet services and placed as needed in various communities. “Using our buses is also an option, but not necessarily the best option,” Jones said.
During Phase 1, meals will be delivered daily via scheduled bus routes. Each school will conduct virtual parent-guardian and student orientation during the week of August 10.
Phase 11 of the plan provides a Hybrid Instruction approach. Students will attend school in split sessions – part time at the facilities; part time remotely. Dr. Jones and his team have devised the specific arrangements for implementing this plan. Students will still have the option to enroll in the District’s Virtual School Program. Phase 11 is scheduled for the second nine weeks period, October 19 to Dec. 18, 2020.
Phase 111 is a return to Traditional Learning, with campuses reopening for all students for traditional instruction. Phase 111 is scheduled to begin January 5, 2021.
Superintendent Jones emphasized that the Coronavirus will dictate which phase is implemented and for how long. He noted that if the virus continues to spread throughout the county during Phase 1, the remote instructional timeline will be extended. “ The status of the virus will also determine if we need to return to Phase 1 at any given time. Our focus is safety for students, school personnel and community,” he said.
According to Jones, during Phases 1 and 11, Fridays will be reserved for student intervention and acceleration.
In other business the board approved the following personnel items recommended by Superintendent Jones.
Resignations: Linda Little, History Teacher, Greene County High School, effective June 30, 2020; Rachel Nickson, Administrative Assistant/Secretary EPS, effective July 31, 2020.
Voluntary Transfers: Makane Morrow, from Technology Coordinator, to Accounts Payable, effective July 8, 2020; Sharon Washington, from Accounts Payable to Interim Maintenance Supervisor, effective July 8, 2020; Rebeca Coleman, from Computer Science Teacher at Robert Brown Middle School, to Interim Technology Coordinator Central Office, effective July 8, 2020; Charlease Smith, from EPS 2nd grade teacher to 3rd grade teacher; Domonique McDaniel, from EPS 3rd grade teacher to 2nd grade teacher.
Employment: Latasha Tinker-Mitchell, 6th Grade Social Studies Teacher, Robert Brown Middle School for 2020-2021 school year; Allison Newton, 6th Grade Science Teacher, Robert Brown Middle School for 2020-2021 school year; Clifford Reynolds, History Teacher, Greene County High School, for 2020-2021 school year; LaMonica Little, Career Prep Teacher, Greene County Career Center for 2020-2021sSchool year; Russell Rivers, Career Coach, Greene County Career Center for 2020-2021 school year; Brianna Bryant, Pre-K lead teacher Eutaw Primary School for 2020-2021 school year; Hillary Bruner, 2nd grade teacher Eutaw Primary School for 2020-2021 school yea; Youlonda Coleman, Cafeteria Manager, Eutaw Primary School for 2020-2021 school year.
The board approved the following administrative services.
Payment of all bills, claims, and payroll.
*Approval of Budget Amendment II
*Contract between Greene County Board of Education and Amy Quitt, Speech-Language Therapy Services, for 2020-2021 school year.
Contract between Greene County Board of Education and Mattie Strode, Homebound Services, for 2020-2021 school year.
Contract between Greene County Board of Education and WeCare Therapy Services, LLC, 2020-2021 school year.
Contract between Greene County Board of Education and Deonna Haley, Psychometric Services for 2020-2021 school year.
Contract between Greene County Board of Education and West Alabama Therapy, LLC for Physical and Occupational Therapy Services, for 2020-2021 school year.
Contract between Greene County Board of Education and Kim Herren, Developmental Delay Services, for 2020-2021 school year.
Plan to reopen Greene County Schools for 2020-2021:Phase I- First nine weeks -Remote learning for all students. Phase II- Second nine weeks -Hybrid Learning. Phase III- Third nine weeks -Traditional learning
Revised 2020-2021 Greene County School calendar.

Commission hires Underwood as CFO; addresses budgetary issues with Sheriff; and plans when COVID-19 occurs among staff

Macaroy Underwood

At its regular meeting held Monday, July 13, the Greene County Commission approved hiring Macaroy Underwood, CPA, of Vestavia, AL, as its Chief Financial Officer (CFO). The proposed agreement with Underwood provides for a two month employment beginning August 1 and continuing through September 30, 2020, when the county’s fiscal year ends. The commission and Underwood will re-negotiate his contract prior to September 30 with a term not to exceed four years.
Underwood’s compensation for the initial two month is proposed at approximately $5,000 per month, with said compensation to be increased with the new contract beginning October. 1, 2020. The proposed CFO’s schedule includes at least 30 hours per week, four days per week, with two days in the County Commission’s office and two days virtually.
The position of County CFO has been vacant since Paula Bird resigned February 29, 2020, after an employment of more than eight years with the county.
Following an executive session, the commission approved adding two Resolutions to the agenda. Resolution 7-13-20 addresses the budgetary issues between the commission and the sheriff regarding the additional employees in the sheriff’s department for whom Sheriff Jonathan Benison previously committed to provide resources. Reportedly, the commission is proposing definitive action relative to the overstaffing in the Sheriff’s Department.
At its regular meeting held Monday, July 13, the Greene County Commission approved hiring Macaroy Underwood, CPA, of Vestavia, AL, as its Chief Financial Officer (CFO). The proposed agreement with Underwood provides for a two month employment beginning August 1 and continuing through September 30, 2020, when the county’s fiscal year ends. The commission and Underwood will re-negotiate his contract prior to September 30 with a term not to exceed four years.
Underwood’s compensation for the initial two month is proposed at approximately $5,000 per month, with said compensation to be increased with the new contract beginning October. 1, 2020. The proposed CFO’s schedule includes at least 30 hours per week, four days per week, with two days in the County Commission’s office and two days virtually.
The position of County CFO has been vacant since Paula Bird resigned February 29, 2020, after an employment of more than eight years with the county.
Following an executive session, the commission approved adding two Resolutions to the agenda. Resolution 7-13-20 addresses the budgetary issues between the commission and the sheriff regarding the additional employees in the sheriff’s department for whom Sheriff Jonathan Benison previously committed to provide resources. Reportedly, the commission is proposing definitive action relative to the overstaffing in the Sheriff’s Department.Resolution 7-13-20(A) addresses the county’s process for protecting employees and sanitizing facilities when an employee has contracted COVID-19 or been exposed to the same. This Resolution confirms that when any employee in a department is infected with COVID-19, that county department will be closed and the employees will be required to secure COVID-19 testing and provide the results to the department head. The premises will be professionally cleaned and the department will re-open with employees who test negatively.
In other business, the commission approved repairing potholes at Robert Brown Middle School as well as re-appointments to the E-911 Board. Alonzo Thompson was re-appointed from District 1 and Johnny Isaac was re-appointed from District 4.
In her report to the commission, Burke provided the following General Fund Budget Recap by Account, Budget Allocation, Actual Spent to Date and Percent Remaining in that account:
Commission – Budget – $488,448.50, Spent – $399,924.57, Remaining – 19%; Circuit Court Judge – Budget -$1,800, Spent -$1,168.66, Remaining – 35%; District Judge – Budget – $1,800; Spent – $1,168.65, Remaining – 35%; Circuit Clerk – Budget $4,300, Spent – $3,599.88, Remaining – 14%; District Attorney – Budget – $6,575, Spent – $4,988.91, Remaining 24%; Court Reporter – Budget$1,198, Spent – $899.55, Remaining – 25%; Probate Judge – Budget – $254,845.36, Spent – $202,301.73, Remaining – 27%. Appraisal – Budget – $283,661.43, Spent – $155,398.95; Remaining – 50%; Revenue Commission – Budget -$203,282,14, Spent – 155,157.49, Remaining – 30%; Elections – Budget – $86,468.25, Spent – $58,098.70, Remaining – 23%; Board of Registrars – Budget -$65,964, Spent – $44,701.38, Remaining 32%; Maintenance – Budget -$193,143.40, Spent – $148,145.51, Remaining – 22%; Sheriff – Budget – $877,051.97, Spent – $772,842.84, Remaining 11%; Jail – Budget – $630,446.38, Spent – $509,405.08, Remaining – 18%; EMA – Budget – $48,943.10, Spent – $35,081.53, Remaining – 28%; Coroner – Budget – $31,384.50, Spent – 17,740.70, Remaining – 42%; Youth Services – Budget – $1,800, Spent $1,800, Remaining 0%; E911 – Budget – $30,000, Spent – $30,000, Remaining – 0%; Library – Budget – $20,320, Spent – $10,051.51, Remaining – 50%; Board of Education – Budget – $4,000, Spent – $4,000, Remaining – 0%; Total General Fund Budget – $3,195,432.03, Spent – $2,540,509.61, Remaining – 27% overall.

Latasha Johnson qualifies for Eutaw Mayoral race

Our City Your Voices.
I am running for Mayor of Eutaw to fix the dysfunction and mismanagement that is bleeding away the resources needed to help our city continue with growth. Our water department is our city’s biggest revenue source and at this point we have lost lots of revenue from our water department. Our city is currently operating without a budget.
The voices of our city workers along with the voices of the citizens of Eutaw are not being heard. I will hear your voices as Mayor of Eutaw. Currently we are leaving our children behind.
Our city needs a good cleaning. It’s time to start telling our citizens they matter by providing them with the best services possible.
I want to re- establish trust in our city government by having financial reports published on time for all citizens of Eutaw to review.
I want to build positive working relationships with City Council members, other government initiatives and all boards in our community. My vision for the City of Eutaw is to create a city where people want to live, work, learn, visit, and love.
I have served on the city council for three years and during my three years I voted for the LOVES project. I spoke up for the roads in Branch Heights and King Village. I also spoke up for many other successful projects done here in Eutaw within my three years as Council woman.
On August 25, 2020, please go to the polls and vote Latasha Johnson for City of Eutaw Mayor. I will hear your voices.