Newswire : Kenyan runner sets new world record for Marathon

 

Runner E. Kipchoge in center

Sept. 18, 2018 (GIN) – The fastest man in the world – Kenyan track star Eliud Kipchoge – not only held onto his title but broke his own record at the Marathon held this week in Berlin. President Uhuru Kenyatta led Kenyans in congratulating compatriots Eliud Kipchoge and Gladys Cherono who retained their respective Marathon titles. “Congratulations my friend Eliud Kipchoge for breaking the World Marathon Record. Proud of you brother,” Harambee Stars captain Victor Wanyama tweeted. Kipchoge smashed the previous world record by compatriot Dennis Kimetto by a massive one minutes and 16 seconds, clocking 2 hours, 01 minute and 39 seconds , setting a new world record and cutting his own personal best by well over a minute. The 33-year-old had won twice before in Berlin. For a man who has the world at his feet, wrote the Kenyan paper Standard Media, Eliud Kipchoge is not your ordinary celebrity. At his Kapsisiywa village in Nandi County, Kipchoge loves herding cattle. He also likes joining in the banter at the shopping center when he is not at the training camp. He is also frequently seen in Eldoret, where he lives at the upmarket Elgon View Estate, and his humility is noticeable. He said he did not see why money should change the character of an athlete who has won half a million dollars. “An athlete with that much in his bank account can brag, but the uneducated farmer who uses the same amount to plant wheat in one season is not even noticed as he walks in town,” he said. At the training camp in Kaptagat, Kipchoge joins fellow athletes – some of them low-profile runners – in the daily cleaning routine, including toilets. “It was a performance so far superior to anything we’ve seen before that comparing it to another marathon feels inadequate,” the running-news website LetsRun.com said of Kipchoge’s new record. “This was Wilt Chamberlain’s 100-point game in basketball, Usain Bolt’s 9.58 in the 100-meter dash.” “Kipchoge’s run was so remarkable it’s hard to give it its proper due,” said LetsRun.com. “In today’s age of hyperbole, this run deserves every accolade said about it. The lower the world record gets, the harder it is to be broken, and the less it should be broken by. Yet Eliud Kipchoge just broke the world record by more than any man in the last 41 years, and he ran the last 10 miles by himself.” In a recent profile in The New York Times, Scott Cacciola called Kipchoge a “philosopher-king of marathons” who has been quoted to say: ‘Only the disciplined ones in life are free. If you are undisciplined, you are a slave to your moods and your passions.’ And: ‘It’s not about the legs; it’s about the heart and the mind.’ And: “The best time to plant a tree was 25 years ago. The second-best time to plant a tree is today.” Kipchoge said modestly: “I am really grateful, happy to smash the world record.” Kipchoge will receive $139,614 for his performance on Sunday, which includes a bonus for keeping his time below two hours and four minutes. He holds a diploma in human resource management and plans to join university. He is a dairy and tea farmer as well as a real estate investor.

Newswire: Three African-Americans running for Governor in three states

By Reginald Stuart, Special to the Trice Edney News Wire from the Richmond Free Press

Three candidates for Governor (TriceEdneyWire.com) – President Trump has angered and mobilized voters across the nation to the point that many have been challenged to turn out en masse this fall to register and vote for candidates who reject his oft time bitter rhetoric. For sure, Black Americans have clinched historic roles in the battle to halt and reverse President Trump’s agenda, with a record three African-American candidates running for governor this November in three states — Florida, Georgia and Maryland. Each is trying to return their state’s governorship to Democratic control. In the process, political analysts said, the three contenders represent a new chapter for the Democratic Party. They reflect the emerging leadership that is younger, more female, broadly diverse and socially progressive, according to analysts. With the exception of Maryland, their Republican opponents are hard-line Trump supporters, dissenting from his agenda quietly when they do. “All of these candidates are pragmatic progressives,” said Emory University political science professor Andra Gillespie, a Richmond area native who earned her degree at the University of Virginia. “They are hoping to present plans to address the economic anxieties of the average working family.” All three gubernatorial contests present distinct challenges to the contenders, regardless of party, based on the views of political analysts.In Florida, where Tallahassee Mayor Andrew Gillum scored a surprise win in last week’s Democratic Party primary, the challenge is stitching together party leaders who all endorsed him after the primary contest, then raising interest among others. Gillum won only 34 percent of the vote to clinch the party nomination. He has to build from there. In Georgia, where Spelman College graduate and tax lawyer Stacey Abrams swept the Democratic primary decisively, winning 70 percent of the votes, the challenge is to continue her impressive campaign to register more historically unregistered voters and to get out the vote by knocking on doors house by house. As for champions backing her cause, Abrams, a former Georgia state legislator, has the support of former President Obama and civil rights icon and Georgia Congressman John Lewis. The Maryland contest, pitting former national NAACP chief Ben Jealous against current GOP Gov. Larry Hogan, presents a different set of tough challenges, analysts said. Not only did Jealous divide the Democratic vote to win the primary, he defeated Rushern Baker, chief executive of heavily Democratic Prince George’s County and one of Maryland’s most respected Democrats with a history in state government. Gov. Hogan had marginal competition in the Republican primary despite his repeated criticism of President Trump and solid opposition to most of Trump’s agenda. Gov. Hogan, a former Howard County executive, has enjoyed high bipartisan ratings during his four years of working with a Democratic-controlled state legislature. Jealous lacks strong broad-based Democratic support and trails Gov. Hogan by a long distance in fundraising. “They have a governor who is really popular in the state,” said Bowie State University government professor William Lewis. Gov. Hogan has been “very cautious” not to disrupt the civil, bipartisan relationship between leaders of the two political parties. All three gubernatorial candidates have plugged into the national network of African-American sororities, fraternities and other civic and social organizations to raise money for campaigns that could land them in the history books of their states. Former Virginia Gov. L. Douglas Wilder, who in November 1989 became the first elected African-American governor in the nation, could not be reached to discuss the three new candidates. But political scientists who have followed Wilder’s career and public service offered some comparisons. Wilder, a longtime state senator who was elected Virginia’s lieutenant governor in 1985, was a seasoned politician who learned and earned political footing with years of public service, political scientists said. The record of service and his high profile in the state’s capital city made him easier to accept as the state’s leader, they said. Before his bid for governor, he had proven leadership skills and was a fiscal conservative, much like his Republican predecessors, analysts said. Also, the political climate in Virginia was more tolerant then than it is today, they said, attributing the souring climate to President Trump. “The younger generation of Blacks are beginning to percolate,” said historian Alvin Thornell, a veteran political scientist who spent decades at Howard University. “The older Whites have become inactive as illustrated in the recent political contests in New York and Massachusetts. They just were aging and dropping out.” The Democratic effort this election season will hinge on “New Deal” Democrats returning to the ranks as they did in the 1960, and the candidates’ and party’s success in recruiting and getting new voters to the polls, Dr. Thornell and other analysts said. They estimated nearly one-third of traditional Democrats have become conservative Republicans or dropped from political participation. This loss must be made up with new registration and participation efforts, like that launched in Georgia by Ms. Abrams.“All of these candidates see whites as part of their coalition,” said Dr. Gillespie, noting that Democrats need to build from the ancestors of traditional Democrats, continue courting Latino voters and register and get to the polls people who have not voted in the past.

Newswire: Waters: Trump would rather put children in cages than prepare nation for natural disasters

 

 

Congresswoman Maxine Waters

(D-CA) WASHINGTON D. C, — In response to the recent release of documents showing the transfer of $9.8 million in Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) emergency preparedness funding to Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE) for its detention centers, Congresswoman Maxine Waters (D-CA), made the following statement: “The Trump Administration’s transfer of $9.8 million in FEMA emergency preparedness funding to ICE for its detention centers at the beginning of this year’s hurricane season is a travesty. This President is more interested in cruel policies that put children in cages and separate them from their parents than ensuring that our nation is prepared for natural disasters. “To make matters worse, on the eve of another major hurricane’s expected landfall, Trump is trafficking in despicable conspiracy theories and denying the devastating death toll in Puerto Rico following Hurricane Maria. Every day, Trump shows the American people just how unfit he is to be President.” As a 2018 National Preparedness Month Congressional Co-Chair, Ranking Member Waters is working to raise awareness of the importance of flood insurance and other forms of emergency and disaster preparedness. Additionally, she has continued her efforts to push for a long-term reauthorization of the National Flood Insurance Program (NFIP), that ensures the affordability and availability of flood insurance. Most recently, she was selected to serve on the 2018 Farm Bill Conference Committee, where she urged her colleagues to protect Section 12609 of the 2018 Farm Bill, which would extend NFIP through January 31, 2019. She has also expressed longstanding concerns about NFIP’s stability and the need to improve FEMA’s flood maps. See her September 2017 op-ed on NFIP at her website. In 2014, Waters led bipartisan legislation to provide homeowners with flood insurance rate relief. The law struck an important balance between addressing affordability concerns, bringing accountability to FEMA, and protecting the financial stability of the NFIP.

Newswire: CBCF Phoenix Awards Dinner revives political titans of Black America

By Hamil R. Harris

Rev. William Barber, keynote speaker and Rev. Jesse Jackson Sr. and his wife, Jacqueline, receives the Phoenix Award for Lifetime Achievement from CBCF Board Chair Sheila Jackson Lee (D-Texas); U. S. Rep. Maxine Waters (D-Calif.) and U. S. Rep. Bobby Rush (D-Ill) PHOTO: Roy Lewis/Trice Edney News Wire

 

(TriceEdneyWire.com) – The Congressional Black Caucus Annual Legislative Conference concluded with the 48th Annual Phoenix Awards Saturday night. But, before the night ended, the event felt more like a political revival meeting where the titans of Black America challenged to pick up the baton of service and sacrifice. “So this is not the time for us to not know who we are,” preached the Rev. William Barber, co-chair of the Poor People’s Campaign, in his keynote speech to the applauding audience of thousands. “James Baldwin said it like this: We made the world and we are the ones who are going to have to make it over. We don’t belong to a people who shrink back when times get tough. America needs a conscious. We need it in the streets. We need it in the Congress. We need it at the ballot box!” At the end of his speech, Barber responded to the oft-heard use of the word, “socialism” in describing the beliefs of politicians and rights leaders who believe in helping the poor. He said, “If caring for people is socialism than the constitution is a socialist document…Jesus was a socialist…If caring for people is socialism then bailing out businesses is wreckless social behavior. We must be the conscious of this nation otherwise the soul of this nation will be fatally wounded…Our vision must be bigger than Trump, our vision must be to save this nation.” Recalling the rolls of historic civil rights patriots, Barber concluded, “Fannie Lou hammer is not coming back…Martin is not coming back….Malcolm is not coming back….It’s our time.” The dinner, themed “The Dream Demands,” was hosted by actress /producer Vivica A. Fox and actor/activist Lamman Rucker who narrated the program that honored Civil Rights veterans, the icons of Black America and the new members of Congress who are people of color. The glitzy, black-tie event, held at the Walter E. Washington Convention Center, is the political equivalent to the Oscars with the political, civic and social stars of the Black community. But the dinner was transformed into church with Rev. Barber’s speech, titled “Knowing Who We Are In Times Like These.” Barber began with advice on Black America’s response to President Donald Trump. He said, “Whatever Donald Trump’s mental status, don’t just focus on him. America has never had the ability to talk about racism and White supremacy.” Reflecting on Dr. Martin Luther Kings’s April 3, 1968 “I Have Been to the Mountain Top” speech that took place in Memphis on the eve of the assassination, Barber said many people focus on the hoop and not the “gravy,” in what King said. “Dr. King looked at the sickness of our society and he said nothing would be more tragic than to turn back now.” Early in the program, the Caucus had a video tribute to some of the icons of Black America who died in the last year. The list included: former Congressman Ronald Dellums, former UN Secretary General Kofi Annan, Winnie Mandela, Rev. Wyatt T. Walker, Roger Wilson, Joe Jackson, Journalist Les Payne, Ebony Magazine Editor Lerone Bennett and Aretha Franklin, the Queen of Soul. Speaking of Dellums, Rep. Barbara Lee (D-Ca.) told the gathering, “Ron embodied service. He was a former Marine, a psychiatric social worker. He loved the CBC with all of his heart.” The Awards included: Georgia Gubernatorial candidate Stacey Abrams, former minority leader (Georgia House of Representatives) received the Adam Clayton Powell Award for her “groundbreaking accomplishments as a legislator at the local and national levels.” Bryan Stevenson, lawyer, social justice activist, founder and executive director of the Equal Justice Initiative, and a clinical professor at New York University School of Law received the ALC Co-Chair’s Award. Lee Porter, executive director of the Fair Housing Council, received the ALC Co-Chair’s Award for her “exemplary leadership in community advocacy.” Aretha Franklin received the John R. Lewis Award of Courage for setting the highest standard of dedication, ability and creativity. Rep. John Lewis (D-Ga.) and Rep. Brenda Lawrence (D-Mi.) honored Franklin and the niece and nephew of the Queen of Soul accepted the award. Lewis said “Aretha Franklin was one of a kind, without her the Civil Rights movement would have been a bird without wings.” Rev. Jesse Jackson, Sr. and his wife, Jacqueline, received the CBCF Chair’s Lifetime Achievement Award. During the Jackson presentation, Rep. Maxine Waters (D-Calif.) said “I don’t care how many times we have done it before, we are going to honor him again and again because he deserves it.” Rep. Shelia Jackson, chair of the Congressional Black Caucus Foundation, said “For me, Rev. Jackson and Sister Jackson are American and International Heroes.” Rep. Bobby Rush said, “Thank you Rev. Jackson for saving my life.” Rush added that had it not been for Jackson running for President in 1984 and 1988, there would not have been a Chicago Mayor Harold Washington nor a President Barack Obama. Jackson told the audience “Our best days are ahead,” and “Let nothing break your spirit.” Mrs. Jackson offered practical advice that included, “Leave room in your life for God to manage all of your shortcomings.” \

Greenetrack settles lawsuit with dissatisfied shareholders for one million dollars

There is a Legal Notice starting on Page 7 of this newspaper, which informs current shareholders of Greenetrack (as of September 5, 2018) of plans to settle a lawsuit filed by dissatisfied shareholders for one million dollars. A hearing will be held on Friday, October 12, 2018 in Greene County Circuit Court by Judge William E. Hereford to determine the fairness, adequacy and reasonableness of the settlement, including the Plaintiffs’ attorney’s fee. Any shareholder wishing to object to or speak on the settlement must inform the Court in writing, at least seven (7) days prior to the hearing in the manner set forth in the legal notice. This lawsuit began over five years ago, on February 19, 2013 when the Plaintiffs, former Greenetrack employees, Ronnie Lavendar, Harvey Jones and others sued the Defendants: Luther Winn Jr, Emma Sugars, Jimmie Paster, Rodney Pham, Elizabeth Byrd and Greenetrack alleging mismanagement, gross waste of corporate assets and failure to carry out fiduciary responsibilities, as officers and Board members of the corporation. After several years of litigation including efforts by Greenetrack to secure a hearing at the Supreme Court of Alabama, the parties agreed to mediation and a settlement discussion, which resulted in the settlement described in the legal notice. Under the settlement, the Plaintiffs will dismiss all claims against Greenetrack and the individual defendants. “ In consideration of Plaintiffs actions, the Defendant’s directors and officers liability insurer shall pay one million dollars in settlement; with one third, to be paid to the Plaintiffs attorneys and two thirds as dividends to all current shareholders, with the exception that no dividends will be paid to the named Defendants including Winn, Sugars, Pater, Pham and Byrd. As part of the settlement, the Defendant Greenetrack directors agree to participate in a corporate governance training session to be conducted by an independent Certified Public Accountant. Attorney for the Plaintiffs, John Parker Yates of Bradley, Mauro and Yates of Birmingham, said he was waiting for a certified list of shareholders and the number of shares they own, from Greenetrack, to determine the amount of money each shareholder will receive. He estimated that there were 200 to 300 shareholders who own differing amounts of stock. The payment schedule will be available at the Clerk of Court’s office prior to the October 12 fairness hearing. Luther Winn Jr., through his lawyers issued a statement in response to the settlement. He stated, “The essence of the lawsuit is that the Plaintiffs questioned the Board’s management of the company and the Board’s execution of their fiduciary responsibilities. Greenetrack unequivocally denies all allegations and insinuations of wrongdoing in the lawsuit. Every Board member has always been governed by their good faith belief that their actions were in the best interest of Greenetrack and its shareholders. “Greenetrack has vigorously defended this lawsuit including filing a petition to be heard by the Alabama Supreme Court. The Supreme Court took the matter under submission over one year ago. Despite Greenetrack’s strong defenses, the matter has remained pending for more than five and one half years. Since the complaint was filed, no evidence has been produced to support the allegations of wrongdoing and Greenetrack has not had an opportunity to have its day in Court for vindication. There is also no way to predict when that day will come and how much more time and money will be expended during the interim. “Therefore, a decision was made that it would be in the best interest of the company and its shareholders to finally end this litigation through settlement. The Settlement Agreement as well as the Court record shows that there has been no determination or adjudication of wrongdoing by any Greenetrack Board member. There is also no admission or wrongdoing by the Board. “ Importantly, the settlement provides that all Greenetrack shareholders, except the named defendant Board members, will receive a dividend disbursement. Everyone knows that Nat Winn is a fighter, but given the economy in Greene County, the Board has agreed to this settlement so that ultimately the Greenetrack shareholders can receive this extra benefit and the Board can devote its attention to conducting the management of the company.”

Newswire : African critics see dark side to China’s ‘charitable’ development loans

China’s President Xi Jinping with Uganda’s President Paul. Kagame

2Sept. 10, 2018 (GIN) – There are two sides to every coin and two widely opposing views on China’s offer of generous loans and grants to African countries announced at the recent Forum on China-Africa Cooperation forum in Beijing. At the confab, with representatives from 53 of 54 African countries, sky-high numbers were bandied about. Chinese President Xi Jinping announced $60 billion in funds for eight initiatives over the next three years, in areas ranging from industrial promotion, infrastructure construction and scholarships for young Africans. Such a financial package has many high-profile defenders on the continent, including the head of the African Development Bank, Akinwumi Adesina. “A lot of people get nervous about China but I am not. I think China is Africa’s friend,” he told the BBC. South African President Cyril Ramaphosa dismissed the view of a “new colonialism taking hold in Africa while Rwandan President Paul Kagame called talk of “debt traps” as attempts to discourage African-Chinese interactions. But several African economists, media pundits and civil society see red flags ahead. “The time has come for African leaders to critically interrogate their relationship with China,” an editorial in Kenya’s Daily Nation said Monday. “What are the benefits in this relationship? Is China unfairly exploiting Africa like the others before it?” “This debt acquired from China comes with huge business opportunities for Chinese companies, particularly construction companies that have turned the whole of Africa into a construction site for rails, roads, electricity dams, stadia, commercial buildings and so on,” said Kampala-based economist Ramathan Ggoobi, speaking to the BBC. In Uganda, a 21 year mining concession to the Guangzhou Dongsong Energy Company produced only 92 job slots so far and the threat of displacement of 12,000 residents from 14 villages. This week in Zambia, the government was forced to refute published reports of the possible Chinese takeover of Kenneth Kaunda International Airport and the power utility ZESCO for unpaid debts. It is increasingly common in countries like Angola, Mozambique or Ghana, which benefit from Chinese loans for infrastructure, to see Chinese trucks and workers who would otherwise be unemployed in China now working in Africa on Chinese projects. “If African countries are not careful, the debt they have to China is going to be the equivalent or even more than the debt that they have to industrialized countries and to the World Bank,” said William Gumede, University of the Witwatersrand professor and chair of the Democracy Works Foundation in South Africa. The next Summit will be organized by Senegal in 2021.

Newswire:  Dallas cop shoots, kills man in his own home

 Same cop was involved in shooting last year in which a man was wounded

By Frederick H. Lowe

 

 

Botham Shem Jean

Special to the Trice Edney News Wire from NorthStarNewsToday.com (TriceEdneyWire.com) – The off-duty Dallas police officer who mistakenly walked into the wrong apartment, believing that was where she lived before shooting and killing Botham Shem Jean, the tenant, has been identified as Amber Guyger, the Dallas Morning News and social media are reporting. Amber Guyger, a Dallas police officer, who entered the wrong apartment, mistakenly believing it was where she lived before and shooting and killing the actual tenant, was arrested Sunday and charged with manslaughter. Guyger, 30, was released on $300,000 bond for Thursday’s […] Dallas Police Chief U. Renee Hall said the Texas Rangers are in charge of the investigation, and they have asked the DPD to refrain from charging Guyger until they finish questioning her. The Dallas Police Department wants to charge her with manslaughter. Guyger, a four-year veteran of the police department, was wearing her police uniform after having completed her shift. She went to the wrong apartment and attempted to open the door, which would not open. The 26-year-old Jean heard the commotion and opened the door. Guyger, believing he was a burglar, shot him. It is not known if any words were exchanged between the two or if Guyger just had a visceral reaction when she saw a black-male face staring back at her. Allison Jean, Botham’s mother, wondered if race played a role in the deadly shooting. “If he had been a white man, would things have turned out differently?”she asked. It was only after emergency medical technicians arrived that Guyger realized she was in the wrong apartment. Jean was pronounced dead at Baylor Medical Center. Social media said Guyger and Jean knew each other. A photograph of Jean with several women is posted on Facebook, but Jean’s family lawyer said that none of the women is Guyger. The two did not know each other, he said. Police also confirmed the two weren’t acquainted. The Dallas Morning News reported that Guyger was involved in an earlier on-duty shooting incident when she shot Uvaldo Perez, 47, in 2017 after he wrestled away her taser. He was shot in the stomach and survived. Jean, a native of St. Lucia, had been working as an intern in risk assurance for accounting at Pricewaterhouse Coopers, an international accounting and consulting firm with offices in Dallas. He was a 2016 graduate of Harding University, a private Christian liberal arts university in Searcy, Arkansas. He earned degrees in accounting and business systems. Jean was also a member of the school’s campus ministry. Dallas West Church of Christ will hold funeral services for Jean on Thursday.

Newswire:  CBCF prepares for 48th Legislative Conference in DC

 By Stacy M. Brown, NNPA Newswire Contributor

 Senator Kamala Harris of California

Two senators: Sen. Cory Booker of New Jersey and Sen. Kamala Harris of California will serve as honorary co-chairs for the Congressional Black Caucus Foundation Inc.’s 48th Annual Legislative Conference scheduled Sept. 12 through Sept. 16 at the Walter E. Washington Convention Center in D.C. It will mark the first time that co-chairs will come from the Senate. Historically, members of the U.S. House of Representatives have served that role. The premier conference, which annually attracts nearly 10,000 people from across the world and is the only event of its kind in the United States, will have the theme, “The Dream Still Demands Courage, Resilience, Leadership and Legislation.” The five-day conference offers more than 90 forums on public policy issues affecting Black Americans. “For more than 40 years, the Annual Legislative Conference has provided an extraordinary platform for people – domestic and abroad – to come together and discuss vital issues related to social justice, leadership, economic prosperity, entrepreneurship and much more,” Texas Congresswoman Sheila Jackson Lee, the chair of the CBCF board of directors, said in a statement. “As we continue to grow and expand the conference, we know that we must be unwavering in our approach to have the difficult conversations, elevate debates about the state of Black America, and also define new and innovative solutions.” The impact of civil and social movements over the last 50 years has played a major role in changing the trajectory of American history, CBCF officials said. This year’s theme focuses on the influence and legacy of these moments, while uplifting present-day champions in the fight for racial equality, justice and freedom., “As we approach the 48th year of hosting the Annual Legislative Conference, we find ourselves in a critical time where, now more than ever, diverse voices are imperative to the future of this nation,” said A. Shuanise Washington, president and CEO of the CBCF. During the conference, attendees will have the opportunity to delve into important conversations with industry leaders from across the globe on public health, gender equality, social mobility, LGBTQ rights and environmental sustainability, among many other topics. The conference provides a safe haven for Black Americans to contribute their experiences, knowledge, and opinions to a larger, national dialogue, Washington said. “The Congressional Black Caucus Foundation’s Annual Legislative Conference is among the most important annual gatherings for Black Americans, and I am honored to lead its 48th convening with Senator Harris,” Booker said. “The Conference theme, ‘The Dream Still Demands,’ presents an important opportunity for our community to lead the national dialogue on so many pressing issues, from fixing our broken criminal justice system to creating economic opportunities for communities of color,” he said. “We have so many urgent challenges that must be addressed, and I’m looking forward to hearing from all of the incredible leaders who will be participating in the conference.” The Annual Legislative Conference is also a time to network and enjoy connecting with a diverse group of individuals, officials said. Networking and special events include the Exhibit Showcase with an on-site employment fair and free health screenings; the Prayer Breakfast; National Town Hall; Gospel Extravaganza; the Annual Celebration of Leadership in the Fine Arts, which honors the contributions of individuals in the performing and visual arts who have influenced our history and inspired generations; and the culminating event, the Phoenix Awards Dinner, which supports the CBCF’s mission-critical programs including education, economic development, health and research. “The Annual Legislative Conference, over nearly five decades, has brought together some of the country’s greatest leaders, innovators, and job creators to address the most pressing issues facing black America,” Harris said. “This year is no exception. The conference will provide a platform to advocate for the voiceless, the vulnerable, and all who believe in fulfilling the American promise of equality and justice for all. I look forward to confronting these issues head on and working to create solutions that will lead to lasting change.”

Newswire:  HBCU millennials energized to vote!

 By Lauren Poteat, NNPA Newswire

Washington Correspondent

 

HBCU students participate in voter rally

During the contentious 2016 presidential race between Donald Trump and Hillary Clinton, voter turnout still proved to be at an all-time low among students who attended Historically Black Colleges and Universities (HBCU). In a report released by Tufts University, 2016 voter turnout plummeted by more than 10 points at HBCUs — from 50.5 percent to 39.9 percent. Only two-years after the election of the very controversial and confrontational President Trump, Kamau Marshall, Director of African American Media and Deputy National Press Secretary ,Democratic Congressional Campaign Committee (DCCC), says that HBCU students are more active and energized to get their vote out and let their voices be heard than ever. Energizing this voting block will make a difference to the outcome of several very important contests this November. “With the Fall semester kicking off, there is a lot of momentum surrounding this very political climate,” Marshall said. “With November elections right around the corner, HBCU students are playing an active and important role when it comes to voting and voter registration.” Believing in hope and the possibility of change, many historically Black institutions across the nation are taking the reins when it comes to increasing voter awareness and registration among their student body. For example, Howard University, located in the heart of the nation’s capital, registered over 1,200 new voters during the month of August. “The more you get involved, the more your voice matters,” Amos Jackson III, president of the Howard Student Government Association (SGA) said. “That’s why it’s was so important for us to heavily promote voter registration. During our August Freshmen move-in day, we were able to register hundreds of new voters.” “There are a lot of issues up for debate, including higher education costs, gun reform and scholarship budgets, that directly affect millennials,” Jackson continued. “So, when people say that their vote doesn’t count, that’s definitely not true. Your vote matters.” Howard provides both new and returning students valuable information, including handouts on absentee ballots and voter choices. Howard students are also encouraged to sign up for a service known as “TurboVote,” an app that sends notifications about upcoming elections, an initiative whose success comes as no surprise to Marshall. “HBCU students are ready to support whoever has their best interest at heart,” Marshall said. “As an HBCU alum—history shows that HBCU students have always been engaged when it comes to the political process. The difference is always with likable candidates.” In states like Florida and Georgia, HBCU participation is at an all-time high, as students and other citizens eagerly await the hopeful election of productive new governors. In the state of Florida, Tallahassee Mayor Andrew Gillum, a Democratic, hopes to become the state’s first Black governor in his campaign against Republican Rep. Rob DeSantis. The race will be one of the most closely watched contests this November, since DeSantis has tied himself to President Donald Trump and defeated other more establishment Republicans. However, Gillum, a firm believer in Medicare for all, has the backing of progressives like Bernie Sanders and the Black community, who were largely responsible for his upset win during the state’s Democratic primary. In the state of Georgia, an Atlanta Journal-Constitution/Channel 2 Action News poll showed that Democrat Stacey Abrams, who is African American, and Republican Brian Kemp are deadlocked in their race at 45 percent each. Contests like those in Florida and Georgia are ammunition to Michelle Obama’s “When We All Vote,” campaign, which recently announced a series of upcoming “When We All Vote” rallies, targeting students at three HBCUs: Clark Atlanta, Morehouse and Spelman. “There is no time more important than now to be civically engaged and to exercise our right to vote,” Mary Schmidt Campbell, president of Spelman said in a statement. “Spelman students have been registering their classmates to vote since August—signing up more than one third of our first-year class as soon as they stepped on campus. We are excited about the energy and advocacy ‘When We All Vote’ will bring to the Atlanta University Center.” Though off-year elections are often seen as less important than those held during Presidential election cycles, Marshall insists that voting during this time November is just as important, particularly for Black millennials. “Voting impacts people’s everyday lives, including the cost of healthcare, investments in job-creation and community issues like gun violence prevention,” Marshall said. “It’s critical to vote now—in particular—because it’s clear that Republican-controlled Washington is not on the side of regular people, and we need a check and balance.” “It’s not just the president that can impact issues you care about, it’s also Congress,” Marshall continued. “No one can take anything for granted and we need everyone to turn out on November 6th.”

Newswire : Decades-old case revives African demand for stolen lands

Chagos protestors Sept. 3, 2018 (GIN) – When colonial powers redrew borders in Africa and picked choice lands for themselves and less desirable land for everyone else, some of those deals remained through this century. Few were undone. This week, a case before the International Court of Justice (ICJ) will decide if colonial deals that redrew African borders can be declared illegal and, if so, if islands taken by the United Kingdom from the nation of Mauritius can be rejoined to Mauritius as before. Mauritius says it was illegally stripped by Britain of the Chagos Islands, now home to a major U.S. air base. The British decision to separate Mauritius from the archipelago in 1965 was a bargaining chip that forced Mauritius to choose – accept the deal or never obtain independence. The deal was in breach of UN resolution 1514, passed in 1960, which specifically banned the breakup of colonies before independence, according to the Mauritian government arguing before the UN-backed court which specializes in territorial and border disputes between states. The four-day session will hear from representatives of 22 countries in a dispute over the rights of exiled islanders to return. The United States has leased the Chagos Islands’ biggest island, Diego Garcia, since 1966 and has built an air base there, while the entire population of around 1,500 people was forced to leave. Although ICJ opinions are not binding, they carry weight under international law. Arguing for Mauritius is elder statesman Anerood Jugnauth, 88, who served for nearly 30 years during four stints as prime minister or president of Mauritius from 1982-2017. “The choice we were faced with was no choice at all: it was independence with detachment (of the Chagos archipelago) or no independence with detachment anyway,” Jugnauth told the 14-judge panel. Olivier Bancoult, leader of the “Chagos Refugees Group said “What we are asking for our right to live on our island as sons of the soil.” UK solicitor general Robert Buckland accepted that the removal of the Chagossians and their treatment thereafter “was shameful and wrong and Britain deeply regrets that fact.” Still, he claims, in 1982, a treaty was signed between the countries that reached “full and final settlement” of Mauritian claims to the archipelago. That deal has since been recognized by the European court of human rights. No date has been set for a decision.