Alabama’s Dec. 12 Special Election for U. S. Senate, bursts into national consciousness, with charges that Judge Roy Moore sexually misused teenage girls in the 1970’s

News Analysis by John Zippert, Co-Publisher

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Vote or Die Campaign supporters rally in Selma

National attention has been focused of Alabama’s December 12th Special Election for U. S. Senate between Doug Jones (Democrat) and Roy Moore (Republican). Moore was accused by five women, who were teenagers between the ages of 14 and 18, of sexually misconduct in the 1970’s, when he was a thirty-year old Assistant District Attorney in Etowah County.
Moore denies all of the charges, but many Republican Senators and leaders have suggested that he withdraw from the race, in favor of a write-in candidate.
Initially four of the girls, now women in their fifties, made statements published in Friday’s Washington Post which were corroborated by as many as 30 family and other witnesses that Moore attempted to sexually mistreat them.
On Monday, a fifth woman made allegations of attempted sexual assault by Moore when she was 16. She stated that Moore offered her a ride home after work at a Gadsden restaurant and took her to a secluded area behind the restaurant and tried to sexually attack her in the car. She escaped his unwanted advances by jumping out of the car.
This week’s New Yorker magazine carries stories quoting people in Gadsden saying that Moore was banned from visiting the city’s mall because he went there to befriend and pick-up underage girls.

Even before this week’s revelations about sexual misconduct, the race between Doug Jones and Roy Moore was projected to be close. A recent poll showed each with 46% of the vote with the rest undecided. Other polls show Moore with a slight lead 49% to 45% for Jones and some show Jones leading Moore by a similar margin.
Many political observers point to the “embarrassment factor” which is how many voters are embarrassed by the prospect of voting for Moore, whose political views and past actions suggest that he is a right-wing religious extremist who will use his position in the U. S. Senate to advance his distorted views and not help the people of Alabama.
Moore is a self-appointed, self-anointed religious zealot who says his directions come from God. He willingly misinterprets the Constitution when it serves his purposes. His right-wing Evangelical Christian conservative followers and base, which represent a significant portion of Alabama’s white voters, support these views unconditionally. These voters supported him in the primary against Luther Strange and voted overwhelmingly for Donald Trump over Hillary Clinton in the 2016 Presidential election.
Moore was twice removed from his state Supreme Court position, once for disobeying a federal court order to remove a 5,200-pound granite Ten Commandments monument from the lobby of the state judicial building, and later for urging state probate judges to defy the U.S. Supreme Court decision that legalized gay marriage.
Moore actively supported Trump’s ‘birtherism campaign’ which suggested that President Obama was not born in the United States and was used to discredit Obama’s legitimacy.
He said more recently that Rep. Keith Ellison, D-Minn., should not be allowed to serve in Congress because he’s a Muslim. Asked about those comments during a Washington visit, Moore said only, “I’ll address that later.”
Many national observers and commentators have suggested that Alabama voters have a real choice between Moore and Doug Jones. Senator Amy Klobachar of Minnesota said, “Alabama voters can choose between Jones who courageously prosecuted Klansmen, who bombed the Sixteenth Street Baptist Church in 1963, killing four teenage girls, or vote for Moore who was improperly pursuing dates with teenage girls. ”
A major factor in the election will be the turnout of Black voters in the Black-Belt counties and major urban areas of Birmingham, Mobile, Montgomery, Huntsville and Mobile. A strong Black voter turnout can help swing a close election to Doug Jones.
Attorney Faya Rose Toure of Selma has been spearheading a ‘Vote or Die Campaign’ since the summer to increase voter registration, education and turnout among the state’s Black voters. ”We know that if Black voters do not participate that people will die because healthcare will be eliminated, good jobs at livable wages will be lost, affordable college education will be curtailed and police brutality will continue killing our Black youth.”
“We must participate in this special election on December 12 and future elections coming in 2018 to protect Black people and insure policies and benefits to keep us alive,” said Toure.
Moore has categorically denied all allegations against him for sexual misconduct with teenage girls. He has refused to consider suggestions from national Republican leaders like Senate Majority Leader, Mitch McConnell, that he step aside in favor of a Republican write-in candidate. McConnell and other Republican Senators have indicated that they may challenge Moore and try to censure and remove him if he elected to fill the unexpired term of Jeff Sessions in the U. S. Senate.
There are less than four weeks until the election on December 12, and voters in Alabama will now make their special election selection under the glare of national press and political attention.

Greene County Commission re-elects Tennyson Smith as Chairman and Michael Williams as Vice Chair

 

County Commissioners and County Engineer show off the new Asphalt Distributor Maximizer 3 truck recently purchased. The 2017 model made by Rosco has a 1,950 gallon capacity and cost approximately $170,000. Standing L to R: County Engineer Willie Branch, County Commissioners Allen Turner, Jr., Lester Brown, Tennyson Smith, Corey Cockrell and Michael Williams. and Asphalt Distributor Maximizer 3 Truck

At its regular November meeting on Monday, November 13, 2017, the Greene County Commission re-elected Tennyson Smith (District 2) as Chairman and Michael Williams (District 5) as Vice Chairman. They will serve in office for the next year.
The Commission also reaffirmed Merchants and Farmers Bank and Citizen Trust Bank, as the county’s banking depositories, with the same signatories on checks. Regular meetings were scheduled on the second Monday of each month at 5:00 p.m. at the William M. Branch Courthouse.
The Commission received a financial report from Paula Bird, CFO for the month of October, which is the first month of the new fiscal year. Bird reported that the Commission had bank accounts totaling $4,572,811 and an additional $1 million in bond related sinking funds.
Bird recommended closing two accounts, the REHAB Grant account with $6,060 and the RSVP account with $4,966, which were no longer needed and transfer the funds to the General Fund Account. The Commission approved this transfer of funds.
The financial report indicated that overall the county had spent 14.7% of its budget, $1,636,824 during the first month. This is a little higher than the 8.33% expected but according to Bird there are some recurring expenses that occur at the beginning of the fiscal year that will even out by the second quarter of the year.
General Fund expenses were running at $416,466 or 13%, for the month, with the Sheriff’s Department and Jail exceeding the budget, due to overtime pay. The Commission approved paying all bills and claims for the month of October.
The Commission voted to instruct the County Engineer, Willie Branch, to consider County Roads 60 and 120 for resurfacing utilizing Federal matching funds. Only major and minor collector roads are eligible for Federal support.

The Commission also considered asking the County Engineer to resurface two miles of road in each County Commission District with county funds. Commissioner Corey Cockrell raised the concern that since his district, District 2, did not have many major or minor collector roads, which are eligible for Federal support, that his district should receive more paving of other roads.
The other commissioners were not impressed with Cockrell’s arguments and supported the original proposal for the County Engineer to designate two miles of roads in each district for paving.

In other actions, The Commission:

* Appointed Sheila Henderson (District 1) and Ron Edwards (District 3) to the DHR Board, which gives recommendations on welfare assistance policies in the county.
* Reappointed Margretta Bir (District 2) and Shirley Edwards (District 3) to the Hospital Board.
* Approved an alcoholic beverage license for Patrice Harris Kimble to operate DOCS Bar on the Lower Gainesville Road.
* Approved travel for Probate Clerk to Licensing Conference, January 10-11, 2018 in Prattville, Alabama.
* Approved Holiday Work Schedule for all county employees.

Newswire : Report on inequality finds 3 richest Americans wealthier than bottom half of all Americans

By The Wisconsin Gazette

A disproportionate share of America’s income and wealth gains has flowed to the top of the economic spectrum, confirms a report from the progressive Institute for Policy Studies (IPS). Americans at the other end of our economic spectrum, meanwhile, watch their wages stagnate and savings dwindle.

The report, Billionaire Bonanza, shows the extreme wealth concentrated within the fortunes of the 400 wealthiest Americans. The report draws on data from the Forbes 400 and the Federal Reserve’s 2016 Survey of Consumer Finances.
Here are some key findings:
· The three wealthiest people in the United States — Bill Gates, Jeff Bezos, and Warren Buffett — own more wealth than the entire bottom half of the American population combined, a total of 160 million people or 63 million households.

· America’s top 25 billionaires together hold $1 trillion in wealth. They have as much wealth as 56 percent of the population, a total 178 million people or 70 million households.

· The billionaires who make up the full Forbes 400 list own more wealth than the bottom 64 percent of the U.S. population, an estimated 80 million households or 204 million people.

· The median American family has a net worth of $80,000, excluding the family car. The Forbes 400 own more wealth than 33 million of these typical American families.

· One in five U.S households has zero or negative net worth. “Underwater households” make up an even higher share of households of color. More than 30 percent of black households and 27 percent of Latino households have zero or negative net worth to fall back on.
The figures underestimate current levels of wealth concentration. The growing use of offshore tax havens and legal trusts has made the concealing of assets more widespread than ever before.
To reduce extreme wealth inequality in the United States we need to take two key steps says the IPS report:
· “We must not make inequality worse through new tax cuts for the wealthy. The proposed Trump tax cuts, as currently designed, would grow top 1 percent fortunes and do little to reduce the ranks of America’s underwater nation.”

· “We need to implement policies to reduce concentrated wealth. Inequality will continue to widen unless we intervene directly to reduce grand concentrations of private wealth. By taxing our wealthiest households, we could raise significant revenues and then invest these funds to expand wealth-building opportunities across the economy. We could also broaden the distribution of America’s wealth by encouraging employee ownership, matching savings programs and similar initiatives.”

Newswire : 1 in 5 veterans would benefit from raising the federal minimum wage to $15

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Economic Snapshot • By David Cooper and Dan Essrow , Economic Policy Institute

November 7, 2017. This Veterans Day, as America celebrates the courage and sacrifice of the millions who have served the country in the armed forces, we should recognize that many of these veterans are now working in low-wage jobs. Of the 9 million veterans in payroll jobs across the country, approximately 1.8 million would get a raise if Congress raised the federal minimum wage to $15 by 2024, as was proposed earlier this year in the Raise the Wage Act of 2017.

This means that despite their service to the country, the intensive training that they have received, and the access to additional education provided to veterans through the GI Bill, 1 out of every 5 veterans is still being paid so little that they stand to benefit from raising the minimum wage.

In April, the Economic Policy Institute, released an analysis of the Raise the Wage Act, which would gradually raise the federal minimum wage to $15 an hour by 2024 and slowly eliminate the lower subminimum wage for tipped workers. We estimated that roughly 41 million workers—both veterans and nonveterans—would get a raise as a result of such an increase.

The stereotype that only middle-class teens working after school would benefit from raising the minimum wage is false. Yet this stereotype breaks down even more dramatically when considering the veterans who stand to benefit from a higher minimum wage. Of the veterans who would get a raise, nearly two-thirds are age 40 or older, over 60 percent have some college experience, and nearly 70 percent work full time.

All workers deserve fair pay for their work. The fact that so many former servicemen and women would benefit from raising the minimum wage is a reminder that labor standards like the minimum wage protect all workers—even those whose courage, training, and sacrifice should guarantee them a good job. Unfortunately, Congress has let the federal minimum wage erode to the point where, adjusted for inflation, workers at the federal minimum wage are paid less today than during the Vietnam War. There is no reason why the federal minimum wage could not be significantly higher than it is today; Congress simply needs to act.

Newswire : African-Americans taking brunt of oil industry pollution: report

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 Smoke is released into the sky at a refinery in Wilmington, California March 24, 2012. REUTERS/Bret Hartman/File Photo

WASHINGTON (Reuters) – African-Americans face a disproportionate risk of health problems from pollution caused by the oil and gas industry, and the situation could worsen as President Donald Trump dismantles environmental regulations, according to a report issued on Tuesday by a pair of advocacy groups.

The report, issued by the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People civil rights group and the Clean Air Task Force, said more than a million African-Americans live within half a mile (0.8 km) of an oil and gas operation, and more than 6.7 million live in a county that is home to a refinery.

“African-Americans are exposed to 38 percent more polluted air than Caucasian Americans, and they are 75 percent more likely to live in fence-line communities than the average American,” the report said, referring to neighborhoods adjacent to industrial facilities.
“In the current regulatory environment, the disproportionate burden of pollution will only increase for low-income communities and communities of color,” the report added
Trump’s administration has begun to unravel Obama-era environmental regulations limiting emissions of carbon dioxide and other pollutants, arguing they are overly costly for industry and unnecessary to protect public health.
A White House official declined to comment on the NAACP-CATF report. But Trump has said his pro-energy industry policies are good for blacks and other minorities because they will create jobs.
Officials for the American Petroleum Institute and the American Fuel and Petrochemicals Manufacturers, which represent the country’s largest fossil fuels companies, did not immediately comment on the report.
CATF and NAACP said in the report that communities should pressure their political representatives for strong environmental regulation.
“Defending the safeguards finalized during the Obama administration and pushing for additional protections against pollution from the oil and gas industry will help improve the health of many African American communities,” the report said.
It added that communities should lobby to have their nearby oil and gas facility shut down: “We must all learn about the oil and gas facilities that are located in our communities, and advocate for their decommissioning or removal.”
The Boston-based Clean Air Task Force issued a similar study in 2016 that linked ozone smog from natural-gas industry pollution to some 750,000 summertime asthma attacks in children, and 500,000 missed school days, per year.
Reporting and writing by Richard Valdmanis; Editing by Peter Cooney
Our Standards:The Thomson Reuters Trust Principles.

Newswire : Democrats, Black candidates win historic victories on election night

By Stacy M. Brown (NNPA Newswire Contributor)

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Melvin Carter was elected the first Black mayor of St. Paul, Minn., on Tuesday night, Nov. 7, 2017. (Screenshot/MelvinCarter.org)
The blue wave that swept the country last week wasn’t just a victory for Democrats, but a resounding win for African American candidates, who defied the odds—and Trumpism—to make history.
In Charlotte, N.C., voters elected the first female African American mayor in the city’s history, choosing Democrat Vi Lyles over Republican Kenny Smith.
In St. Paul, Minn., Melvin Carter became that city’s first Black mayor, earning slightly more than 50 percent of the vote in a field that featured 10 candidates and a write-in opponent.
In Virginia, Democrat Justin Fairfax trounced Republican challenger Jill Vogel in the race for lieutenant governor. In January, Fairfax will become only the second African American to hold statewide office in Virginia. Doug Wilder was the first, serving as lieutenant governor from 1986-1990, then as governor from 1990-1994.
Fairfax said his and other Democratic victories could “be the match that sparks the wildfire of progressive” change all across the country.“All across the world. This is a battle for the nation’s soul,” Fairfax said. “Since I announced my candidacy, this campaign has been about the future, about building a Virginia where all of us have the opportunity to rise.”
Most saw victories by Democrats as a referendum on President Donald Trump, whose record low job approval rating has shrunk to 39 percent according to various reports.
Republicans lost races for governor in Virginia, where Ralph Northam easily beat Trump-backed Ed Gillespie, and in New Jersey, where former U.S. Ambassador to Germany Phil Murphy won election as governor, defeating Republican Lt. Gov. Kim Guadagno.
Also, in Virginia, attorney general Mark Herring, a Democrat, won reelection over Republican John Adams while Democrats gained at least 10 seats in the House of Delegates.
The party also won key mayoral races in New York, Charlotte, Stamford, Conn., and St. Petersburg and, in a direct rebuke of Trump and Republicans who have tried to repeal the Affordable Care Act, voters in Maine approved a ballot measure to expand Medicaid under former President Barack Obama’s signature healthcare law.
On Twitter University of Virginia political scientist Larry Sabato wrote that the results were a “backlash to Trump and Trumpism, pure and simple.”
Results may have been helped by a strong get out to vote campaign launched by the NAACP. The legendary civil rights organization and its approximately 500,000 adult and youth members around the country were on the frontlines committed to raising awareness for political, educational, social and economic equality of minorities in the electoral process, the organization said in a statement posted on its website.
“The NAACP is actively engaged in increasing the African American responsiveness of citizens to be fully engaged in the democratic process,” the statement read.
Terry McAuliffe, Virginia’s outgoing Democratic governor, told reporters that the election night victories were indeed a springboard for future elections, including the 2020 presidential race.
“This was a spark plug,” McAuliffe said. “This is the revitalization of the Democratic Party in America.”
Former Vice President Joe Biden said voters clearly sent a message to Trump. “A resounding defeat tonight for President Trump,” Biden tweeted. “Voters across the country rejected the ugly politics we have seen this past year. Instead, they chose candidates who unite and inspire us.”
Members of the Congressional Black Caucus also engaged voters. Rep. John Lewis (D-Ga.), urged everyone to vote. “The vote is precious, almost sacred,” Lewis said. “It is the most powerful nonviolent tool or instrument in a democratic society [so] use it.”
And, if that admonition wasn’t enough, the legendary civil rights leader reminded voters why participating is so important. “I was beaten, left bloody and unconscious so that every American has the right to vote,” Lewis said. “Friends of mine gave their lives. Do your part. Vote.”

School board selects personnel for 21st Century Community Learning Centers

At a called meeting held Monday, Oct. 30, 2017, the Greene County Board of Education approved personnel recommended by Superintendent James Carter for the 21st Century Community Learning Centers (CCLC) at Eutaw Primary School and Robert Brown Middle School. The two schools have been approved for a total of $300,000 funding each year for three years for the extended day programs scheduled to begin Monday, Nov. 6, 2017.
Dr. Shayla McCray, At Risk Coordinator for the Greene County School System, will serve as overall director of the project. Teachers include Keisha Williams, Charlease Smith, Lester Cox, Felicia Smith, Raven Bryant, Janice Jeams, Rebecca Coleman, Miakka Taylor, Shunetta Kirkman, and Tamecisha Abrams. Assistant teachers include Tweila Morris and Rachael Nickson. According to Dr. Carter, the personnel may be adjusted depending on the number of students participating in the programs.
The after school programs will operate approximately 2 hours after school hours at each school facility, serving up to 100 students with a focus on STEAM, Language arts, recreational skills, entrepreneurial education, nutrition and health, counseling and expanded library access.The project also includes a parental involvement and family literacy component; anti-bullying, drug and violence prevention.