COVID-19

As of September 14, 2021 at 10:00 AM
(according to Alabama Political Reporter)

Alabama had 754,242 confirmed cases of coronavirus,
(29,554) more than last week with 12,718 deaths (302)

more than last week)

Greene County had 1,177 confirmed cases, (33 more cases than last week), with 41 deaths

Sumter Co. had 1,225 cases with 35 deaths

Hale Co. had 2,815 cases with 81 deaths

Note: Greene County Physicians Clinic has Johnson and Johnson, one dose vaccination for COVID-19; Call for appointments at 205/372-3388, Ext. 142; ages 18 and up.

COVID-19

As of September 6, 2021 at 10:00 AM

(according to Alabama Political Reporter)

Alabama had 724,688 confirmed cases of coronavirus,

(14,959) more than last week with 12,416 deaths (133) more

than last week)

 

Greene County had 1,153 confirmed cases, (14 more cases than last week), with 40 deaths

Sumter Co. had 1,198 cases with 35 deaths

Hale Co. had 2,751 cases with 81 deaths

Note: Greene County Physicians Clinic has Johnson and Johnson, one dose vaccination for COVID-19; Call for appointments at 205/372-3388, Ext. 142; ages 18 and up.

COVID-19

As of August 31, 2021 at 10:00 AM

(according to Alabama Political Reporter)

Alabama had 699,729 confirmed cases of coronavirus,

(34,076) more than last week with 12,283 deaths (283) more

than last week)

 

Greene County had 1,139 confirmed cases, (66 more cases than last week), with 39 deaths

Sumter Co. had 1,182 cases with 34 deaths

Hale Co. had 2,692 cases with 8i deaths

Note: Greene County Physicians Clinic has Johnson and Johnson, one dose vaccination for COVID-19; Call for appointments at 205/372-3388, Ext. 142; ages 18 and up.

COVID-19

As of August 10, 2021 at 10:00 AM

(according to Alabama Political Reporter)

Alabama had 615,901 confirmed cases of coronavirus,

(23,484) more than last week with 11,648 deaths (106 ) more

than last week)

 

Greene County had 1010 confirmed cases, (17 more cases than last week), with 38 deaths

Sumter Co. had 1,123 cases with 34 deaths

Hale Co. had 2,424 cases with 79 deaths

Note: Greene County Physicians Clinic has Johnson and Johnson, one dose vaccination for COVID-19; Call for appointments at 205/372-3388, Ext. 142; ages 18 and up.

COVID-19

As of July 12, 2021 at 10:00 AM (according to Alabama Political Reporter) Alabama had 555,215 confirmed cases of coronavirus, (3,917) more than last week with 11,402 deaths (44 ) more than last week)

Greene County had 942 confirmed cases, (4 more cases than last week), with 35 deaths

Sumter Co. had 1,067 cases with 32 deaths

Hale Co. had 2,288 cases with 78 deaths

Note: Greene County Physicians Clinic has Johnson and Johnson, one dose vaccination for COVID-19; Call for appointments at 205/372-3388, Ext. 142; ages 18 and up.

Newswire: Leadership Conference on Civil Rights urges Congress to close Medicaid insurance coverage gap, especially in Southern states

Today, the Leadership Conference on Civil and Human Rights, along with several other civil rights organizations wrote Democratic members of Congress urging them to close the Medicaid coverage gap in upcoming legislation. The groups pointed out that the current coverage gap leaves over 2 million people, including 600,000 African Americans living in Alabama, Florida, Georgia, Mississippi, North Carolina, South Carolina, Tennessee, and Texas living below the poverty line, without access to affordable health insurance coverage.  “In the states that have undertaken it, Medicaid expansion has narrowed racial and ethnic disparities in both coverage and access to care, and it has saved lives. But these more than 600,000 African Americans living in the eight Southern states that have refused to take up the Medicaid expansion have experienced none of these gains, solely because of where they live. Overall, 60 percent of people in the coverage gap in the 12 non-expansion states are people of color, reflecting long-standing racial and ethnic disparities in health care access that Medicaid expansion would do much to address. In these states, African Americans are 19 percent of the adult population but 28 percent of those in the coverage gap,” they noted.  The groups also urged members of Congress to address the coverage disparity in light of the ongoing COVID-19 pandemic. “The COVID-19 pandemic amplified pre-existing inequities in health care, with deadly consequences for many in the Black community as well as other communities of color,” they said. “Therefore, we are urging Congress to address this by providing a federal pathway to coverage for the millions of African Americans and other people of color shut out of their state’s Medicaid program.”  Given the systemic racial and economic disparities in the American healthcare system, the groups concluded by insisting that Congress move to address this coverage gap immediately, to ensure that mistakes of the past are not repeated to the detriment of the most vulnerable communities.  You can view the full letter at the Leadership Conference on Civil Rights webs

COVID-19

As of July 2, 2021 at 10:00 AM (according to Alabama Political Reporter) Alabama had 551, 298 confirmed cases of coronavirus, (315) more than last week with 11,358 deaths (6) more than last week)

Greene County had 938 confirmed cases, (1 more cases than last week),with 35 deaths

Sumter Co. had 1,062 cases with 32 deaths

Hale Co. had 2,273 cases with 78 deaths

Note: Greene County Physicians Clinic has Johnson and Johnson, one dose vaccination for COVID-19; Call for appointments at 205/372-3388, Ext. 142; ages 18 and up.

Newswire: Ending Virtual-School Oppression: Black students disproportionately punished for harmless behavior at home during zoom classes

Special to the Trice Edney News Wire from the Southern Poverty Law Center

(TriceEdneyWire.com) – Isaiah Elliott was suspended from seventh grade for holding a toy gun in an online art class. Ka’Mauri Harrison, 9, faced nearly two weeks of suspension for picking up a BB gun in his own bedroom – after his brother had tripped over it. A 15-year-old girl was incarcerated for not doing her homework, which violated parole. All three students have at least three things in common: They were punished for normal childhood behavior, they were in their own homes at the time of their petty offenses, and they are all Black. As Black students shifted from the classroom to online learning during the COVID-19 pandemic, harsher disciplinary measures that had been carried out against them at school followed them home. “Zoom suspensions followed similar patterns to in-person classroom management tactics that feed Black students into the school-to-prison pipeline,” Cory Collins, a senior writer for the Southern Poverty Law Center’s Learning for Justice program, points out in his story “It Was Always About Control.” The story is featured in the latest edition of Teaching Tolerance magazine, a publication of Learning for Justice. Prisons and schools have much in common, says Dr. David Stovall, a professor of Black studies, criminology, law and justice at the University of Illinois at Chicago. Hallway protocols, restrictive bathroom policies, surveillance cameras and metal detectors can be found in both places. “It’s something a little more insidious” than the school-to-prison pipeline, Stovall says, arguing that students “are reminded based on the discipline and curriculum policies that they’re in a de facto prison in those spaces.” It’s a particularly acute problem for Black students. Nationally, Black students are nearly four times as likely to face suspension as white students, according to an analysis of public data by ProPublica. In Wisconsin, they are 7.5 times as likely as white students to face suspension, and roughly six times as likely in Minnesota and Connecticut. In fact, Black students were overrepresented in every punishment measure that was evaluated in a 2018 analysis by the U.S. Government Accountability Office, regardless of poverty level or type of school. Whether students are learning at a distance or in person, punitive policies are harming them, Collins writes, citing academic experts and civil rights advocates. Instead, schools across the country should take a systematic approach to undoing structures that rely on compliance and punitive discipline rather than students’ learning and overall well-being. “It’s a pathway that is sadly well-worn and very visible,” says Miriam Rollin, the director of the Education Civil Rights Alliance, which was convened by the National Center for Youth Law. “Our system is failing kids, and we need to hold that system accountable.” Dr. Nataki Gregory, CEO of CT3, an organization that provides training focused on relationship building and student engagement with a view to higher achievement, instructs school leaders to consider who benefits from a policy and who is harmed by it. “Because the truth is there are some of these policies that just make zero sense and have nothing to do with learning,” she says. “It’s really just about compliance or oppression. And if that’s what you’re trying to bring into the school, then you have the wrong focus.” Collins wrote: “Before a Colorado school suspended Isaiah Elliott for holding a toy gun, they sent a police officer to his home. ‘You put his life in jeopardy,’ his mother said to the school – a school that had followed its systems and policies exactly as designed.”

COVID-19

As of May 25, 2021 at 10:00 AM (according to Alabama Political Reporter) Alabama had 542,562

confirmed cases of coronavirus, (1,571) more than last week with 11,124 deaths (79) more than last week)

Greene County had 927 confirmed cases, (1 more case than last week), with 34 deaths

Sumter Co. had 1,054 cases with 32 deaths

Hale Co. had 2,247 cases with 78 deaths

Note: Greene County Physicians Clinic has Johnson and Johnson, one dose vaccination for COVID-19; Call for appointments at 205/372-3388, Ext. 142; ages 18 and up.

COVID19

As of May 12, 2021 at 10:00 AM (according to Alabama Political Reporter) Alabama had 531,751 confirmed cases of coronavirus, (2,305) more than last week with 10,997 deaths (67) more than last week) Greene County had 925 confirmed cases, (2 more cases than last week), with 34 deaths Sumter Co. had 1,047 cases with 32 deaths Hale Co. had 2,231 cases with 77 deaths Note: Greene County Physicians Clinic has Johnson and Johnson, one dose vaccination for COVID-19; Call for appointments at 205/372-3388, Ext. 142; ages 18 and up.