Annual Kwanzaa celebrations continue in local schools and community

Kwanzaa Celebration at Greene County High School, Wednesday, December 18, 2019.
Kwanzaa Celebration at Robert Brown Middle School, Tuesday, December, 17, 2019.
Kwanzaa Celebration at Eutaw Primary School, Wednesday, December, 18, 2019.

The annual Kwanzaa cultural celebrations in Greene County were held at each of the local schools as well as in a public event for the community. The week before the December holiday season, students at Eutaw Primary, Robert Brown Middle and Greene County High were engaged in the annual Kwanzaa Cultural presentations co-sponsored by the Greene County Alumnae Chapter of Delta Sigma Theta Sorority, Inc. and the Harambe Community Youth Organization. The community Kwanzaa was held Monday, December 30, 2019 at the Eutaw Activity Center.
Although many of the young students were not familiar with the concept, history and principals of Kwanzaa, they were eager to participate, even learning some of the Swahili terms and names used in the presentation.
Kwanzaa is a harvest celebration honoring the culture and heritage of African Americans, which brings the community together to lift the blessings of the ending year and to pledge and dedicate themselves toward working together to build a better community for everyone.
The community Kwanzaa participants included members from the sponsoring organizations, students from the local schools and the 2020 Debutant Class. Mrs. Isaac Atkins, President of the Greene County Alumnae Chapter of Delta Sigma Theta Sorority, Inc. brought greetings and also introduced chapter members present.
The community Kwanzaa celebration was honored with musical selections provided by the Greene County Community Choir. Rev. Joe N. Webb led the devotions and blessing of the Harvest Feast.
The community shared the Talking Stick for expressions of the Kwanzaa Principles.
The dishes for the feast were provided by the community attendees.
The seven day Kwanzaa observance begins December 26 through January 1. Kwanzaa was founded by Dr. Maulana Karenga at the time of the Watts Riots in California in the 1960’s. Dr. Karenga was seeking a positive approach for rebuilding communities and celebrating African American history and culture. He took the name for the holiday from the Swahili word Kwanzaa meaning first fruits of the harvest.
The Seven Principles of Kwanzaa also lift the values to strive for in our lives and communities: Umoja – Unity; Kujichagulia – Self Determination; Ujima – Collective Work and Responsibility; Ujamaa – Cooperatives; Nia – Purpose; Kuumba – Creativity; and Imani – Faith.

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