SOS calls on State of Alabama to remove memorial to Dr. J. Marion Sims on Capitol grounds

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Jon Broadway addresses SOS press conference calling for removal of statue

Montgomery, AL – SOS, the Save Our Selves Movement for Justice and Democracy, is asking the State of Alabama to remove the statue of Dr. J. Marion Sims from the Capitol grounds.  SOS is also asking that the charges be dropped against Jon Broadway, who has been charged with Criminal Tampering in Montgomery County.

The press conference was held at 11:00 a.m. on Wednesday, May 9, 2018 on the grounds of the Alabama Capitol. SOS is a grassroots movement of more than 40 Alabama statewide organizations working for social change and to promote justice and democracy in the state.
Standing on the grounds of the Alabama Capitol, state Senator Hank Sanders said: “The reason this memorial must be removed is because Dr. J. Marion Sims operated on a number of enslaved Black women without their consent and without anesthesia of any sort.
“Dr. Sims lived in Montgomery before moving to New York City.  Between 1845 and 1849, Sims performed numerous operations on multiple Black women in Montgomery, all without anesthesia or consent and sometimes with other doctors looking on.  Some of these women endured torturous surgeries repeated times. Alabama cannot have a statue of Dr. J. Marion Sims, a man who committed repeated atrocities against Black women in Alabama, on public grounds.”
Johnny Ford said: “Dr. Sims is widely known as the father of gynecology because, in large part, of these horrible medical experiments he conducted on enslaved Black women in Alabama.  Like the infamous Tuskegee Syphilis Experiments on Black men that took place in Alabama in the 20th Century, these atrocious actions that took place in Alabama in the 19th Century against Black women should, at the very least, result in an apology and the removal of this statue.  Memorials to Dr. Sims have been removed in New York and other states once Sims’ atrocities were brought to public and officials’ attentions. That has sadly not been the case in Alabama. This must change.”
Attorney Faya Rose Toure said: “The charges against Jon Broadway must be dismissed because he has done nothing wrong. In fact, he has done something right by calling attention to the memorial of a man who openly abused and tortured enslaved Black women.  From the facts I know, Mr. Broadway simply helped perform a skit about Dr. Sims’ actions and a little ketchup may have gotten on the statue during a performance given to draw attention to the torture and abuse that powerless Black women suffered at the hands of Sims.”
Ketchup was used in the skit on Confederate Memorial Day to symbolize the bloodshed that Dr. Sims caused to Black women. A small amount of ketchup was smeared on the pedestal of the statue as part of the protest.
Attorney Toure said, “It was also terrible that Mr. Jon Broadway was forced to leave jail in his underwear.  They took the clothes off his back because enforcement claimed they needed his clothes for evidence. Some observers pointed out that there were traces of ketchup on his clothes, which prompted the arresting officers to retain his clothes. The police did not offer any replacement clothing when they released Broadway.  All of this is connected to the recently passed state law to protect Confederate memorials.”
Law Professor Emerita Martha Morgan said: “This happened the same day that other people were hanging wreaths on the Capitol grounds for Confederate Memorial Day, and none of those people were arrested for Criminal Tampering or for anything else.  Yet the actions of a man who was trying to present a full picture behind the history of another monument were seen as tampering, and Mr. Broadway was arrested based on the content of his message.  This press conference today is the initial step in a series of efforts to bring peace and justice to this spot where this memorial now sits and to provide the full picture of the history of these memorials and monuments.”

School board approves personnel transfers, non-renewals and resignations

At its regular meeting held Monday, May 14, 2018, the Greene County Board of Education approved a variety of changes regarding the school system’s personnel as recommended by Superintendent, Dr. James Carter. Transfers among the central office personnel effective for the 2018-2019 school year include the following: Robert Stewart from Technology Coordinator to Truancy Officer; Cindy Taylor from Truancy Officer to Attendance Supervisor; Makane Morrow from Child Nutrition Program Director to Technology Coordinator.
Other transfers from the various school facilities effective for the next school year, include the following.
* Garry Rice from Principal at Greene County High School to Principal at Robert Brown Middle School;
* Fredrick Square, from Principal at Robert Brown Middle to Assistant Principal at RBM;
* Toice Goodson, from Principal of 9th Grade Academy at GCHS to Principal at Greene County Learning Academy;
* Barbara Martin, from Principal at Robert Brown Middle to Principal at Eutaw Primary School;
* Teresa Atkins from teacher to CNP Director;
* Patricia Rhone from Business Education Teacher at Robert Brown Middle School to Teacher at Greene County Career Center;
* Nathaniel Webb from Transportation Department to Maintenance Department;
*David Peterson from Maintenance Department to Transportation Department.
The board approved the following non-renewals recommended by the Superintendent Carter. It should be noted that individuals approved for non-renewal at the close of a school term may be called back to the school system, for the next term, on an as-needed basis.
* Eutaw Primary School Non-Renewals: Johnnie Lee, 1st Grade Teacher; Kendra Payne; 1st Grade Teacher; Fentress Means, Physical Education Teacher; Tweila Morris, Secretary; Katlin Whittle, Art Teacher; Jacqueline Allen, Reading Intervention Teacher.

* Robert Brown Middle School Non-Renewals: Teresa Atkins, Consumer Science Teacher; Justin Booth, Agro-Science Teacher; Danielle Edison, Special Education Teacher; Fredrick Holmes, Music / Band Teacher; Shunetta Kirkman, 6th Grade Teacher; Ashley Moore, 5th Grade Teacher; Cardelia Page, 5th Grade Teacher; Deborah Summerville, 7th Grade Teacher; Miakka Taylor, 8th Grade Teacher; Katlin Whittle, Art Teacher; Jacqueline Edwards, Part-Time Janitor.
*Greene County High School Non-Renewals: Justin Booth, Part-Time Physical Education/Agro-Science Teacher; Wanda Gaitor, Part-Time Secretary; Fredrick Holmes Music / Band Teacher; Fentress Means, Driver Education Teacher; Demilia Snyder, Science Teacher.
* Greene County Career Center Non-Renewals: Sondra Green, Health Science Teacher; Mary Henderson, Part-Time Secretary.
* Greene County Learning Academy, Non-Renewal: Dr. Bennie Pennington, Lead Teacher.
* Maintenance Department Non-Renewal: Carl Oliver.
* Transportation Department Non-Renewal: Gerald Holloway, Bus Driver.
The board approved the following resignations: Shennell Spears, Business Management Administration, Greene County Career Center, effective May 312, 2018; Diana Bowden, Lab Aide, RBM, effective May 26, 2018; Dr. Sharon Jennings, Principal Eutaw Primary School, effective May 31, 2018; Marsha Powell, Bus Aide, Department of Transportation, effective March 16, 2018; and Dora Hardy, Cook at Greene County High School.
The Superintendent recommended and the board approved sending letters of termination to the following personnel for Additional Service Contracts (Separate Contracts).
* Robert Brown Middle School: Corey Cockrell as Head Football Coach, B-Team Basketball Coach and Athletic Director; Henry Miles as Assistant Football Coach; Dorris Robinson as Cheerleader Sponsor; Jeffery Wesley as Head Basketball Coach.
*Greene County High School: Rodney Wesley as Head Basketball Coach & Assistant Football Coach; Kendra Payne as Head Basketball Coach (Girls); Karon Colman as Head Football Coach & Track Team Coach; Jacob Sullivan as Assistant Football Coach; Janice Jeames as Girls’ Volleyball Coach and Girls’ Basketball Coach; Frederick Holmes as Band Director; Fentress Means as Head Baseball Coach; Justin Booth as Assistant Baseball Coach; Su’Kovia Hicks as Head Softball Coach (Girls); Drenda Morton as Cheerleader Sponsor.
The board approved the following recommendations for employment as bus drivers for the Summer Enrichment Program: Felecia Davis; Marcus Steele; Teresa Hill; Eddie Coats; Ayanna Crawford; Michael Bolden; Verna Nickson.
The board also approved hiring Walter Taylor of Montgomery, AL as Interim CSFO.
In Administrative Services, the board approved Robert Brown Middle School request to travel to Six Flags Over Georgia for Math and Science Day; and payment of all bills, claims and payroll.
In other business, the board approved the 4-day work week, each day from 7:30 am to 4:45 pm, beginning the week of June 4-8, 2018 and ending the week of July 23-27, 2018. Any and all schedules that differ from the one stated above must be submitted and approved by the superintendent prior to the start date of June 4, 2018.

Greene County DST Chapter awards $3,000 in scholarships

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Shown L to R: Shaleah McCain, Hale County High School; Jamia Jackson, Greene County High School; Tony White, Jr., Greene County High School; Eldria Jones, Green County High School and Alexis Jordon, Greene County High School. Not shown: MaKayle Lewis, Greensboro High School.

The Greene County Alumnae Chapter of Delta Sigma Theta Sorority, Inc. held a reception recently honoring the six students awarded $500 scholarships upon their enrollment in postsecondary schools. The scholarship recipients from the sorority’s service are: Shaleah McCain, Hale County High School; Jamia Jackson, Tony White, Jr., Eldria Jones, and Alexis Jordan, all of Greene County High School. Not pictured is Makayla Lewis, of Greensboro High School. The reception, held Monday, May 14, 2018, included Mediation by Jacqueline Allen; Greetings by Chapter President Andrea Perry; Words of Encouragement by Evelyn James. The scholarship recipients and their parents enjoyed refreshments and fellowship with sorority chapter members present.

Newswire : Meghan Markle’s marriage opens the door to a discussion of England’s first Black Queen

By Frederick H. Lowe

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Queen Charlotte ruler of England and Ireland

Meghan Markle’s wedding Saturday in London to Prince Harry, sixth in line for the British Throne, will make her the first black person to marry into the House of Windsor, which was founded in 1910, but the not the first black Royal.
That distinction is held by Queen Charlotte of England, who ruled England and Ireland with her husband King George III during the American Revolution. They were members of the House of Hanover, which ruled England and Ireland from 1714 until the death of Queen Victoria in 1901.
Prince Harry and Meghan Markle announced their engagement on November 27, 2017, 199 years and 10 days after Queen Charlotte died. She died November 17, 1818. Queen Charlotte was born on May 19, 1744.
Princess Sophie Charlotte descended directly from the African branch of the Portuguese Royal House, Margarita de Castro y Sousa, according to the African American Registry.
Sophie Charlotte and King George III married the day they met, which was September 8, 1761. The wedding took place in the Chapel Royal, in St. James’s Palace in London. Sophie Charlotte was crowned England’s first black queen when she was only 17. She gave birth to 15 children. Thirteen of the 15 children lived and became adults. Her son Prince Edward, the Fourth Duke of Kent, was Queen Victoria’s father.
Her African bloodline was downplayed. “Portraits of the Queen had been reduced to fiction of the Black Magi, until two art historians suggested definite African features of the paintings derived from actual subjects, not just the minds of painters,” according to African-American Registry.
As part of her marriage agreement, Sophie Charlotte stayed out of politics, although she was interested in the Revolutionary War in America which was waged by King George III who was portrayed in the 1994 feature film “The Madness of King George.” King George went mad and blind. He was placed in the guardianship of his wife.
In keeping with Filmdom’s tradition of not accurately portraying blacks, Helen Mirren, a white actress, played Queen Charlotte in the film.
Queen Charlotte was educated and well- read and is said to have written an estimated 400 letters. Only a few still exist.
Unlike the black queen who is always portrayed as evil in Disney cartoons, Queen Charlotte was known for her good works.
She established the Royal Botanic Gardens Kew, also known as Kew Gardens, near London. And in 1800, she was the first person in England to introduce a Christmas tree. It was decorated with sweetmeats, almonds, toys and raisins in paper packets.
Queen Charlotte also established in London the Queen Charlotte Maternity Hospital in London. The city of Charlotte, N.C. is named in her honor. And Queen Charlotte supported and taught music by Johann Christian Bach. Wolfang Amadeus Mozart dedicated Opus 3 to the Queen.
She is the great, great-great grandmother of Queen Elizabeth II, England’s current monarch.
This story first was published in November 2018.

Newswire :OP-ED: Golfing While Black is not a crime

By Sandra Thompson, Esq. (President, NAACP York County, Pa. Branch)

 

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From left, Carolyn Dow, Sandra Harrison, Karen Crosby, Sandra Thompson and Myneca Ojo. The five women were golfing at Grandview Golf Club in York County, Pa., when they were asked to leave. (Sandra Thompson)
On Saturday, April 21, 2018, I woke up excited, anticipating a round of golf at Grandview Golf Club in York, Pa. I was going to play with four ladies from “Sisters in the Fairway” (SITF), a group of about 15 professional, predominantly African American women in York County, Pa., who golf.
SITF are women of various levels of expertise from beginner to advanced golfers. The group was formed in 2008 as a sisterhood of ladies who golfed with their husbands, many of whom were members of the York County Black Golfers Association.
We appreciate the challenge that golf presents and the control that golf requires. Golf lessons are required. We know and respect golf etiquette and rules.
As a single mother, I prioritized raising two children, building my business and working in the community. In 2010, when my youngest child left for college, she suggested I “get some friends.” So, as an empty-nester, I took her suggestion. I was introduced to the ladies of SITF.
I began playing around 2011-2012 and found that I loved the game. SITF normally travels to different courses throughout Central Pennsylvania in each outing. Some also play in other states and in other countries, when they travel. As individuals, we occasionally played at Grandview, which was now under new ownership.
On this day, there was a slight wind and I took selfies on my way to the golf course. All five of us appeared at our scheduled tee times. I was given permission to play as a fifth member.
We were the only group of African American women playing. It began great, even though Grandview had an hour delay. We did not complain. We were elated to see each other since we had not all been together since the past season. We took selfies, as we anticipated anticipating enjoying each other’s company, the day, and golf.
We hit great drives “hitting them high and letting them fly.” We played “ready golf.” We were excited.
Our excitement did not last. On just the second hole, former York County Commissioner Steve Chronister was pushy and aggressive, falsely accusing us of slowing down the other players. He said he was refunding our membership, so we would leave. We reminded him that we paid and wanted to play.
Our group was in shock. Despite the distractions, we made up time and finished the first half in about two hours as required.
But the stress was too much. Our game was affected. We were upset—wondering whether Chronister was going to approach us again and dismayed that he wanted to refund our memberships, as though we and our money were worthless—so three women in our group left halfway through the game.
When we, the remaining two, tried to continue playing to salvage the day, five large White men, including Steve and his son, Jordan Chronister, approached us and told us to get off their property. I became tongue-tied trying to ask why they were kicking us off the property when we had a paid membership and also paid for the day. They gave us multiple reasons, each one proving to be false.
Because we questioned why we could not enjoy our membership and play golf, the police were called. I was bewildered. We had done nothing wrong. I was also embarrassed and humiliated having been made into a spectacle as White men exited the golf restaurant area and watched the events unfold.
We waited for the police. I was fearful and apprehensive as to what would occur when police arrived. What would be the officer’s attitude?
But I did not want to leave and have charges filed against me in the mail, because Grandview gave a false statement that I had no opportunity to answer.
When police arrived, they heard my name and recognized me. The police were professional and went back and forth between Grandview Golf Club and us, advising us that Grandview wanted to refund the memberships of the entire group, even those who left early.
The officers interviewed the group behind us and concluded that we were not playing slowly and maintained pace, even with five people. The group told the police we did not hold them up, and were pleasant to them. It was obvious that the police were called, because of Grandview’s owners reaction to the us, and not because the group behind us had complained.
A few days after the incident, I was still anxious, because I did not know if they were going to file charges. I knew charges could be sent in the mail. It was not until the police chief issued a statement that no charges were warranted could I sigh in relief. Nevertheless, I developed headaches for a few days.
I have been an attorney in Pennsylvania for over 18 years. I ran for judge in York County, Pa. in 2009 and 2017. I am the President of the York County, Pa., NAACP branch, Pennsylvania NAACP Legal Redress chair and former first vice president. I am also the vice chair of the York County Democratic Party. I advocate for criminal justice reform, voting rights, equal access to fair wages, employment, and quality housing and education.
But, who cares about my titles?
Everyone who pays their fee should be allowed to play golf, if they desire, without interruption, without false accusations, without intimidation, and without the threat of police, especially when they have committed no crime or disruption.
I kept wondering whether the police were professional, because they knew me and what would have occurred had they not known me. While we waited, I texted the other three ladies who had left. I let them know that the police were called, and they became so upset they wanted to return for fear of what could happen. With the long history of how police interact with African Americans, businesses know, or should know, that when they call the police they are inviting them to arrest the person, which could also lead to injury or death.
This situation was not as bad as the recent arrest of two Black men at a Starbucks in Philadelphia, because we were not arrested nor was it as bad as the incident involving a 25-year-old Black woman at a Waffle House in Saraland, Ala., because police did not assault us. However, it is similar to them in that businesses are using the police as their personal complaint department and as enforcers without repercussion or accountability. Police must turn away once they learn that the matter is not criminal, but civil. Law enforcement policies and practices must change. Police must enforce laws against these businesses and their owners who file false complaints. Legislators must act to hold businesses accountable. Patrons and the community must stand up in the midst of these situations, instead of being passive observers or actively trying to concoct legitimate reasons for the mistreatment of Black patrons, when they are nonexistent. See something, say something. I commend the men who publicly spoke out for us. I am thankful for the public outcry of support. We, as African Americans, just want to live.

Some wanted a place to meet, others wanted utensils for their meal, others wanted to exercise, and we simply wanted to golf. We demand the freedom to frequent businesses, to use services, to ask questions, and, yes, to even complain without the fear of being arrested, beaten or shot. The irrational fears of some White people should not be our problem and should not interfere with our quality of life. We will not stand idle or remain silent while our freedoms and lives are devalued and threatened. Despite the attempted movement to take us back to a time of second-class citizenry, we will not return. We will maintain the shout, “Forward Ever, Backward Never!” for ourselves and our brethren of other races, colors, nationalities, religion and of other protected classes. Only together will we make positive change.
This article was originally published at TheCrisisMagazine.com.

Newswire : “Black Panther” Chadwick Boseman salutes grads at Howard University

By Lauren Poteat (NNPA Newswire Contributor)

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 “Black Panther” actor Chadwick Boseman delivered the commencement address during Howard University’s 150th Commencement Ceremony in Washington, D.C. (Freddie Allen/AMG/NNPA)

After celebrating the success of back-to-back, global box office hits, Marvel’s “Black Panther” actor Chadwick Boseman, returned to his alma mater, Howard University, to deliver the school’s 2018 commencement convocation address.

In March, Marvel’s “Black Panther” became the highest-grossing superhero movie of all-time in the United States (not adjusted for inflation), when it surpassed the $623 million mark set by “The Avengers” in 2012, according to Variety.com. Then, Boseman reprised his “Black Panther” role for “Avengers: Infinity War,” which is currently the fifth highest grossing movie of all-time. Boseman also starred as Jackie Robinson in the film “42”.

Championing his own personal experiences during his time studying at the prestigious, historically Black university, Boseman urged proud degree recipients, to press forward, to hold up their heads and to never fear rejection.
“I can think of no better place to be right now, after the ‘Black Panther’ and ‘Avengers’ campaigns, then to return and participate in these graduation ceremonies with you,” Boseman told the graduates. “It is a great privilege, graduates, to address you on your day, a day that will be one of the most important accomplishments of your life to date.”
Howard University President Dr. Wayne A. I. Frederick recalled “how Boseman and his classmates advocated and participated in a three-day protest against the university to dismiss an initiative to transition the College of Fine Arts into the Department of Fine Arts. The protest was unsuccessful in stopping the transition,” a press release about the president’s speech said.
With Boseman by his side, Dr. Frederick, “announced a campaign to re-establish the College of Fine Arts and launch an Endowed College of Fine Arts Award,” the press release said.
Dr. Frederick encouraged the graduates to “take risks” and “learn how to be wrong.” “It is the best way to learn and grow,” Dr. Frederick said. “Build a culture of generous listening so that others may be emboldened to take risks, too.”
According to school officials, during the 2018 commencement convocation, Howard University awarded 2,217 degrees, including 343 master’s degrees, and 90 Ph.Ds.
Boseman called Howard University “a magical place” as he recalled the day that he met Muhammad Ali, as he walked across “The Yard.”
“I remember walking across this yard on what seemed to be a random day, my head down, lost in my own world of issues like many of you do, daily. And I raise my head…Muhammad Ali is walking towards me,” Boseman said. “Time seemed to slow down, as his eyes locked on mine. He then raised his fist into a quintessential guard and I was game to play along with him, to act as if I was a worthy opponent. What an honor to be challenged by ‘The Greatest of All-Time.’”
Boseman continued: “I walked away floating like a butterfly. I walked away, at that moment, amused at life, amused that no one would be able to believe that story, but me. That is the magic of this place [Howard University].
“Almost anything can happen here,” Boseman said before giving the crowd the official Howard salute (“H-U! U-Know!”).
Boseman also praised the students for their drive and perseverance in organizing the longest sit-in protest at Howard University’s administration building in the school’s history. Allegations of mismanagement in the school’s financial aid office sparked the protest, which lasted nearly two weeks in April. “Everyday that you fought for, was not for yourself, but for those that come after you,” Boseman said.
Closing out the high-energy ceremony, Boseman offered one last nugget of wisdom, urging graduates to find their purpose. “Purpose is the essential element of you,” Boseman said. “It is the reason you are on the planet at this particular time in history. Your very existence is wrapped up in the things you are here to fulfill.”
This article was originally published at BlackPressUSA.com.

Newswire : Poor People’s Campaign launches six weeks of protests around U.S.

By Associated Press

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Poor Peoples Campaign demonstration in Washington D. C.

Activists converged on state capitals around the U.S. on Monday to begin six weeks of non-violent protests calling for new programs to help the millions of Americans who live in poverty, an overhaul of voting rights laws and other social change.
Reports by police from seven state capitols and Washington, D.C., showed more than 200 people had been arrested or cited during the first day of the so-called Poor People’s Campaign. In many instances, police said protesters were cited for blocking traffic. In Washington, the two leaders of the campaign were among the protesters arrested outside the U.S. Capitol. Campaign leaders said the protests would cover 35 states.
A statement from the campaign said the Rev. William Barber and the Rev. Liz Theoharis, its two co-chairmen, were among those arrested outside the U.S. Capitol for standing in the middle of a street. Police had no immediate confirmation of arrests there or a specific number of those stopped.
“We’re living in an impoverished democracy,” Barber said. “People across the country are standing up against the lie of scarcity. We know that in the richest country in the world, there is no reason for children to go hungry, for the sick to be denied health care and for citizens to have their votes suppressed. Both parties have to be challenged — one for what it does and one for what it doesn’t do.”
Barber is a North Carolina minister and former president of the state NAACP chapter. Theoharis is co-director of the Kairos Center for Religions, Rights, and Social Justice in New York.
In Alabama, twelve (12) people were arrested for blocking thec street in front of the State Capitol in Montgomery.
In Missouri, 88 people were issued summonses in Jefferson City for obstructing a lawful police order to move after they blocked a downtown street. Police in Raleigh, North Carolina, led off 49 people after they walked out into the street in front of the legislative building, held hands and refused to depart until each was taken away and cited.
Officers cited 10 protesters at the Iowa Capitol who gathered in and around the staff offices of Gov. Kim Reynolds when they refused to leave the building at the close of business hours.
The campaign cast the protests as a “reignition” of the Poor People’s Campaign, the 1968 movement started by the Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. and others to challenge racism, poverty and militarism. According to the campaign, protesters will spend the next 40 days engaged in nonviolent action, including the mobilization of voters and holding teach-ins.
The first teach-in is scheduled for Tuesday in Washington. It is to feature Marian Wright Edelman, president of the Children’s Defense Fund and a part of the 1968 campaign.

Rev. Kenneth Glasgow says “God had prepared us for this attack”

Special to the Democrat By: John Zippert,
Co-Publisher

 

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On Friday, May 4, 2017, The Ordinary Peoples Society (TOPS) of Dothan, Alabama held its 17th Annual Founders and Unity Day. The dinner was attended by 200 people who were honoring Rev. Kenneth Glasgow on his 53rd birthday, the TOPS organization for its work with the community and incarcerated people around the country and ‘Moma Tina’, Glasgow’s mother, for her work in sustaining the organization and helping to feed hungry and homeless people in the area.
The dinner came in the shadows of Rev. Glasgow recent arrest and suspicious charge of ‘capital murder’ in the March 26th death of Breunia Jennings. Rev. Glasgow was asked by Jamie Townes, a friend to help him find his car that was taken. Glasgow, Townes and two others went to search for the car. They spotted the car and then the car rammed into them.
Townes jumped out of Glasgow’s car, drew a gun and shot Jennings. When the police came they arrested Townes and Glasgow and released the other two persons. Glasgow, a nationally recognized activitist on prisoner issues was charged with ‘capital murder’ under an Alabama statute which says unless you actively try to prevent a crime you are an accessory and implicit in it.
National and state organizations like the NAACP, Save Ourselves Movement for Justice and Democracy, ANSC, ADC and others challenged the suspicious nature of Kenneth Glasgow’s arrest and are working to have the charges dismissed. These groups and others packed the Dothan Courthouse for Glasgow’s preliminary hearing on April 6, 2018.
Circuit Judge Benjamin Lewis sent Glasgow’s case to the Houston County (AL) Grand Jury but also made the unusual decision in a capital case to grant a bail request of $75,000. Glasgow has been out of jail on bail since April 9, 2018.
Friday’s dinner was one of his first opportunities to make a public statement to supporters about his case. “ We expected this kind of attack because of the work we have done on prisoners rights, our fights against police brutality and mass incarceration of Black young people. We have been preparing for this. God has been preparing us for this kind of attack.
“We were ready for this. We were prepared. When we got to jail, we started organizing and had a prayer circle for the DA, the Police Chief and others. WE must get beyond this to fight the real issues.”
There were other speakers at the dinner that supported Glasgow and TOPS including Dorsey Nunn of ‘All Of Us or None, a California group that initiated the ‘Ban the Box’ campaign; Asha Bandele, with a New York City prisoners campaign, State Senator Hank Sanders of Selma, former Mayor Johnny Ford of Tuskegee and others.
Rev. Glasgow said that he needs people to continue to help support the work of TOPS (The Ordinary People’s Society, 403 West Powell Street, Dothan, Alabama 36303; phone 334-671-2882 office and 334-791-2433 cell; West Powell Street. Dothan, AL 36303) and support his Legal Defense Committee by going to this website: www.glasgowdefensecommittee.org.

Citizens Trust Bank welcomes Tracey Boney as a new Mortgage Loan Officer for the Eutaw and surrounding communities

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Birmingham, ALABAMA (May 1, 2018) – Citizens Trust Bank and its Mortgage Division are happy to announce the addition of Mortgage Loan Officer I, Tracey Boney to the Birmingham, Alabama location.
Tracey brings a fresh perspective to the loan world, and uses her background in relationship management to bridge the path between renting and buying a home. Tracey is passionate about helping first time homebuyers realize their dream of homeownership by listening to their needs and future desires, and pairing them with the best loan program to fit their lifestyle.
Tracey’s knowledge of available loan programs for each purchase goal will ensure clients from first time homebuyers to veteran home owners will be matched with the best loan to satisfy their needs. She can also help with the decision to refinance a current home loan or cash out on home equity for home improvements or debt consolidation.
Since each goal requires a unique program, Citizens Trust Bank offers a wide variety of first-time home buyer loan programs that Tracey can assist with including fixed rate Conventional, FHA, and VA loans, adjustable rate loans, adjustable rate loans.
When Tracey is outside of the office, she enjoys spending time with her family and friends.
Her hobbies of interest are bowling, attending sports events and traveling. She is also a member of Beulah Missionary Baptist Church.

Her love for gospel and classical music is woven into her family’s makeup. She also plays the piano and violin. Her love for the two instruments led her to study classical music for many years.
About Citizens Trust Bank
Citizens Trust Bank has built financial relationships since 1921 – Through it 96 year legacy built on principle, we go beyond meeting the needs of offering banking products and service solutions; our mission is to financially empower our customers and their generations to succeed. In turn, their success is our success. The bank takes pride in offering its financial solutions throughout metropolitan-Atlanta and Columbus, Georgia and Birmingham and Eutaw, Alabama. Through its parent company, Citizens Bancshares Corporation, the Bank offers its common stock over-the-counter to the general public under the trading symbol CZBS and can be found at www.ctbconnect.com.
For more information contact Diedra. L. St.Julien at 404.575.8371 or by email
Diedra.stjulien@ctbatl.com

BBCF awards $80,000 in arts grants across Black Belt region

L to R: Carol P. Zippert and Darlene Robinson, BBCF Board President,accept grant award for annual festival

The Black Belt Community Foundation awarded $80,000 in arts initiative grants to 29 community based organizations in its 12 county service region. The awards ceremony was held Saturday, May 5, 2018 at the Hank Sanders Technology Center at Wallace Community College Selma.
Community projects benefiting through the awards include museums, community theaters, festivals and youth organizations offering concentrated arts programs. Through these individual projects, it is anticipated that nearly 22,000 Black Belt residents will be inspired, affected, or touched in some way – whether by taking a local art class, by viewing a musical or theatrical performance, or by visiting a local folk arts festival.
In Greene County, the Society of Folk Arts & Culture was awarded $2,500 for the production of the annual Black Belt Folk Roots Festival. Other awards throughout the Black Belt region included: In Bullock County, a total of $3,500 was awarded; in Choctaw County, $1,655; in Dallas County, $11,500; in Lowndes County, $2,500; Macon County, $8,500; in Marengo County, $2,500; in Perry County, $2,500; in Pickens County, $4,975; in Sumter County, $4,500; and in Wilcox County, $15,370.
Two organizations received Art Education grants of $10,000 each – Coleman Center for the Arts and Tuskegee-Macon County CDC.

BBCF President Felecia Lucky stated, “Our arts grant review committee has been incredibly impressed with the diverse spectrum of inspiring arts programs presented to us in application for 2018 grants funding. Being able to reach nearly 22,000 people across our service counties through these grants is a testament to the support we receive from the Alabama State Council on the Arts and the National Endowment for the Arts.“
BBCF was established in 2004 to support community efforts in the Black Belt that contribute to the strength, innovation, and success of all the region’s people and communities. A partnership formed in 2006 with BBCF, the Youth & Cultural Committee of the Black Belt Action Commission, and the Alabama State Council on the Arts (ASCA), which established the Black Belt Arts Initiative.
The goals of this project are; to work in partnership with local community based organizations, to forge collaborations with local schools to advance arts education, to document and promote the region’s artistic assets, to assist arts organizations in becoming more efficient and effective and to Provide opportunities for citizens of the Black Belt region to be exposed to and participate in the arts.
Since 2006, $1,400,671 has been awarded through BBAI Arts Grants to support various arts activities across BBCF’s twelve-county service area. In total, BBCF has invested over $3.8 million from BBAI Arts, Community and other grants into regional nonprofits, based in and serving Alabama’s Black Belt.