New Peace and Justice group to launch African Liberation Day May 25

 

m.laminsaidykhan

M. Lamin Saidykha

(TriceEdneyWire.com/GIN) – The former head of Greenpeace Africa took the opportunity of the climate march in Washington last weekend to announce that “Africans Rising for Justice, Peace and Dignity”- a new Africa-wide social movement focused on climate change – will be officially launched on African Liberation Day – May 25.
“It’s a terrible injustice that even though we the people of Africa collectively contributed the least to emissions, we are the ones that are paying the first and most brutal price,” said Kumi Naidoo, adding “we’ve got climate refugees, land that’s drying up, water sources that are disappearing and so on, which is already creating a quite a catastrophic situation.”
“We feel extremely hurt that the countries that carry the biggest responsibility continue to deny their responsibility, but also deny the very fact that the science is absolutely clear that we have to get off dirty energy,” he said in an interview with the news show Democracy Now.
Some 200,000 took part in the DC event, which included spontaneous music and informal speeches. The new group lists “Actions & Events” on their webpage for May 25.
“We chose that day so that we can remind ourselves, our leaders and the world that we are tired of waiting for that liberation to be delivered. And to show them that we are prepared to take action and hold political and business leaders accountable and reinvigorate the journey to that better life for all.”
It continues: “We are one of the youngest continents in terms of our demographic profile but we have some of the oldest leaders. If political leaders were honest with themselves many would acknowledge that they’ve been in power for far too long. They’ve run out of fresh ideas. We need to make way for younger people who have new perspectives on the problems facing the world.
Africans Rising is about deepening solidarity across the continent. We must step up and be the first to speak out against human rights violations.
The group’s coordinator is Muhammed Lamin Saidykhan, a 32-year-old Gambian human rights activist who organized widespread protests leading to the resignation of former Gambian head of state Yahya Jammeh..
The Kilimanjaro Declaration, the movement’s founding charter, the Kilimanjaro Declaration, reads: “Africa is a rich continent. That wealth belongs to all our People, not to a narrow political and economic elite. We need to fight for economic development that is just and embraces social inclusion and environmental care. We have a right to the ‘better life’ our governments have promised.”
For more information, visit the webpage at http://www.africans-rising.org/
GLOBAL INFORMATION NETWORK creates and distributes news and feature articles on current affairs in Africa to media outlets, scholars, students and activists in the U.S. and Canada. Our goal is to introduce important new voices on topics relevant to Americans, to increase the perspectives available to readers in North America and to bring into their view information about global issues that are overlooked or under-reported by mainstream media.


 

Local DST Alumnae Chapter awards college scholarships

Delta.jpg

Shown above Scholarship Recipients: Jasmine Williams, Greene County High School; Darrylvoceya Campbell, Greensboro High School; Yasmeen Amerson and Lauren Smith, Greene County High School. Recipients not shown include: Sabrina French Greene County High School and Nahia Constant, Greensboro High School.

The Greene County Alumnae Chapter of Delta Sigma Theta Sorority, Inc. awarded scholarships to graduates of Greene County High, Eutaw, AL and Greensboro High, Greensboro, AL. Greene and Hale Counties are within the Chapter’s service area. Each recipient will receive a $500 award once he or she has confirmed enrollment in a postsecondary institution.
The Sorority Chapter held a reception for the recipients and their guests on Thursday, May 18, 2017 at Ruby’s in Eutaw. Mrs. Nancy Cole, shared an inspirational meditation. Dr. Carol P. Zippert, the Chapter’s 2nd Vice President, brought words of encouragement. Chapter President Andrea Perry greeted the assembly and Isaac Atkins introduced the DST Chapter members present. Mrs. Nancy Cole served as Mistress of Ceremony.

Farmers reap ‘bitter chocolate’as unrest rocks Ivory Coast in Africa


Cocao producerin Ivory Coast
Producer displays cocao harvested in Ivory Coast

May 15, 2017 (GIN) – Troubles in the Ivory Coast have pushed the price of cocoa to its highest level in five years.

Don’t blame the farmer. In the world’s largest producer of cocoa, farmers have been going hungry since government slashed the price it guarantees for farmers by 36 percent, then withheld payments due since October – even while the nation’s economy grew by close to 9 percent for each of the past four years.

Visitors to the capital, Abidjan, may see signs of new wealth and a surge in construction transforming the city. Investors have poured in from Mauritius to Morocco. But many ordinary Ivorians have yet to see the benefits of growth.

Daily broadcasts on state TV celebrate the nation’s so-called economic miracle, but an outburst of social unrest this year – the worst since 2011 – is a sign that people are running out of patience.

“There’s a colossal development gap between Abidjan and the interior,’’ Youssouf Carius, an economist with Pulsar Partners, a private investment fund, told Bloomberg News. “Even though some areas have a lot of potential, private investment won’t arrive as long as public services remain largely non-existent.’’

“People feel that inequality is growing, and it’s a feeling that’s fanned by symbols: in Abidjan, you won’t go a day without seeing a Porsche Cayenne,” Ranie Kone, an economist, told a reporter. “We’re in a culture where showing off is very important and people tend to live above their means.”

While farmers, rough diamond miners, and former rebel soldiers struggle to get a living wage, the number of dollar millionaires in Ivory Coast climbed 45 percent in the past decade to 2,500, more than the African growth average of 19 percent, AfrAsia Bank Ltd. said in a report. It’s likely to jump another 80 percent in the coming decade, according to the bank.

Meanwhile, over 8,000 former rebel soldiers who were promised bonuses for helping to bring President Alassane Ouattara to power in 2010 are taking up arms over the promise broken by the administration. Military violence has been reported in the nation’s two largest cities and witnesses on the ground describe empty streets, closed schools, banks and offices in the upscale Plateau district.

“The situation is dangerous in terms of what will happen if a full-blown confrontation erupts between loyal forces and mutineers, Al Jazeera’s Ahmed Idris reported. “The civilian population will be caught in the crossfire.”

Elsewhere on the continent, Madagascar, the world’s largest grower of vanilla beans is predicting steep price hikes after a tropical cyclone in March destroyed over 30% of the crop.

Board of Education approves non-renewal of school personnel recommended by superintendent

The Greene County Board of Education held its monthly meeting, Monday May 8, 2017, one week earlier than usual to satisfy the timeline for end of school requirements regarding school personnel. State law mandates that non-tenured personnel must be notified of their non-renewal status 15 days prior to the end of the school term. Individuals who receive a non-renewal notice from the Board of Education, may still be considered for continued employment for the next school term.
With the recommendation of superintendent Dr. James H, Carter, Sr, the board approved the following personnel for non-renewal by school.
Eutaw Primary School: Eric Hendricks, Physical Education Teacher; Jackie Allen, Reading Intervention.
Robert Brown Middle School: Sheketha Crowell, 5th Grade Teacher; Sheila Billups, 5th Grade Teacher; Shenetta Kirkman, 6th Grade Teacher; Wanda Blakely, Special Education Teacher; Joseph Polk, 7th Grade Teacher; Tiffany Linebarger, STEM Facilitator; Angel Cordona; Adjunct Dance Instructor; Vassie Brown, Adjunct Instructor, Drama; Frank Jackson, Auto Mechanic Teacher (part-time); Teresa Atkins, Family and Consumer Science; Jacob Sullivan, 8th Grade Social Studies; Jeffery Nolen, 7th Grade Social Studies; Marjorie Duncan, Reading Intervention.

Greene County High School: Frank Jackson, Auto Mechanic Teacher;
Greene County Career Tech Center: Sondra Green, Health Science Teacher (part-time); Tweela Jordan, Teacher Aid (part-time).
Greene County Learning Academy: Cordarrin Wilson, Alternative School Teacher; Fentress Means, Alternative School Teacher.
Additional Service Contracts (separate contracts) were terminated for the following personnel:
Rodney Wesley, Head Basketball Coach (Boys); Kendra Payne, Head Basketball Coach (Girls); Gentrell Eatman, Head Football Coach; Eric Hendericks, Assistant Football Coach; Walter Taylor, Assistant Football Coach; Janice Jeames, Girls’ Volleyball Coach; Frederick Holmes, Band Director; Jerome Franks, Head Baseball Coach (Boys); Jacob Sullivan, Head Softball Coach (Girls); Angel Cardona, Dance line Sponsor; Cordarrin Wilson, Track Team. Under personnel items, the board approved a three year Principal Contract (probationary) for Toice Goodson, 9th Grade Academy Principal.
The board approved the following personnel for the system’s Summer School Program.
Eutaw Primary School Teachers: Diana Bowen; Pamela McGee; Montoya Binion; Keisha Williams; Tamecisha Abrams.
Robert Brown Middle School Teachers: Vanessa Bryant, 4th Grade; Theodora Scott, 5th Grade; Shunetta Kirkman, 6th Grade; Katoya Quarles – Math, 7th & 8th Grades; Su’Kova Hicks – English, 7th & 8th Grades.
Greene County High School: Angela Harkness; Gilda Jowers (additional facilitator).
The following administrative services, recommended by Dr. Carter, were approved by the board.
* Travel Biloxi, MS to attend 2017 Spring Nike Championship Basketball Clinics on May 12, for Rodney Wesley, Jeffery Wesley, Kendra Payne, Codarrin Wilson.
Provide Summer Feeding Program at the following school sites: Greene County High School – June 15-30 (duration of Summer School Program); Eutaw Primary School – June 5-16 (two weeks).
Replacement of controls for units above ceiling and remove additional insulation for new controls into existing heating and cooling units at Robert Brown Middle School at additional costs of $8,000.
Authorize Superintendent Carter to secure independent experts to determine cause of buckling of gym floor at Greene County High School.
Chief School Financial Officer, Katrina Sewell, presented the board with the April Accounts Payable Check Register and the Payroll Check Register. Sewell reported that all local accounts have been reconciled with the exception of Carver Middle School/Paramount accounts, which are consolidated through March, 2017. According to Sewell, the system has requested assistance from the State Department of Education to complete the bank reconcilements.
The CSFO also noted that the Bus Fleet Renewal Fund for 2016-2017 was short $19,000. This amount will be reimbursed to the general fund account from the 2017-2018 Fleet Renewal Fund.
Superintendent Carter presented updated on various programs/projects of the current school year including the following: Family and Consumer Science; Computer Science Program; Drama Program; Career Tech Program; JROTC Program; Dual Enrollment; Choir; Community Services.

May is National Foster Care Month

Judge Judy.jpgShown above Judge Judy Spree signing proclamation surrounded by l to r: Jimmie Zoppie Foster Parent, Fannie Smith President of Foster Parents, Mattie Gray Foster Parent. DHR Staff: Director Wilson Morgan, LaTonya Wooley, Foster Care Worker, Jacqueline Hughes, Family & Children Services Supervisor, Beverly Vester, Q.S. Coordinator and Kimberly Tyree.

May is National Foster Care Month, a month set aside to acknowledge foster parents, family members,volunteers, mentors, policymakers, child welfare professionals, and other members of the community who help children and youth in foster care find permanent homes and connections. During National Foster Care Month, we renew our commitment to ensuring a bright future for the more that 400,000 children and youth in foster care, and we celebrate all those who make a meaningful difference in their lives.
Greene County encourages citizens to volunteer their talents and energies on behalf of children and adults in foster care, foster parents, and the children welfare professionals working with them during this month and thoughtout the year

Trayvon Martin, who dream of being a pilot, to receive Honorary Aviation Degree Florida Memorial University will posthumously award Martin at the HBCU’s commencement this month.

By Taryn Finley
Trayvon M
Trayvon Martin at aviation high school

An aviation school in Florida is honoring Trayvon Martin with a posthumous degree at its commencement this month.
Florida Memorial University, a historically black college, announced in a Facebook post Wednesday that the 17-year-old, who was gunned down by a neighborhood watchman in 2012, will receive a bachelor’s degree in aeronautical science with a concentration in flight education on May 13.
The degree will honor the “steps he took during his young life toward becoming a pilot.” His parents, Sybrina Fulton and Tracy Martin, will accept the degree on his behalf.
The university’s president, Roslyn Clark, said that awarding the posthumous degree is important for the school and noted that Fulton is an alumna of the HBCU.
` “Of special significance is awarding posthumously the Bachelor of Science Degree in Aviation to Trayvon Martin. Sybrina, our alum, epitomizes strength and dignity as she uplifts other victims of violence while effecting change for a more equal and just society,” Clark said in the press release.
In addition to the degree, the HBCU will host a post-commencement fundraiser. A portion of the proceeds will go to The Trayvon Martin Foundation, which is headquartered at the college.
Before he was killed, Martin had dreams of becoming a pilot. Fulton told the Tampa Bay Times in 2012 that her son spent time studying at George T. Baker Aviation School during his freshman year of high school. Martin was inspired by his uncle, Ronald Fulton, who had a brief career in aviation. Barrington Irving ― who in 2007 became the youngest person at the time to pilot a plane around the world solo ― also had a big influence on Martin’s interest after he started attending Irving’s summer youth programs.
“He loved flying and working with his hands. Barrington Irving took him on his plane at the Opa-Locka Airport. He got a chance to sit in the cockpit and that did it for him,” Fulton told the Times. “He wanted to be a pilot or work as a mechanic in aviation. He was mechanically inclined and could fix just about anything.”
Neighborhood watchman George Zimmerman killed Martin five years ago in Florida. Zimmerman called 911 to report that Martin, who was carrying an Arizona Watermelon Fruit Juice and Skittles, looked suspicious. Despite dispatchers instructing Zimmerman not to pursue the teen, he did anyway. He got into a fight with Martin and fatally shot him.
Martin’s death sparked protest nationwide and led to the creation of Black Lives Matter. Zimmerman was acquitted of second-degree murder and manslaughter charges in 2013.

Lawmakers to fight U. S. foreign aid cuts to Somalia

Somali child
   Impoverished Somali child
Apr. 24, 2017 (GIN) – Plans to slash foreign aid to Somalia now at the brink of famine would hurt humanitarian relief efforts and programs to curb terrorism, say local lawmakers from Minnesota.

Speaking in Minneapolis at a forum on the drought situation in the Horn of Africa, U.S. Representative Tom Emmer (R-Minnesota) decried the administration’s proposed 31-percent cut in foreign aid. “Terrorist groups like al-Shabab have demonstrated a history of capitalizing on this type of crisis and we can’t allow that to be the case today,” he said.

Senator Amy Klobuchar (D-Minnesota) said the U.S. needs to help drought and famine victims in their own country, before they are forced to flee. “We have so many people here from Somalia that have relatives and friends, and when you don’t help people in their own country it kind ends up on your shores anyway,” she said.

A recent review by General Thomas Waldhauser, head of US Africa Command, acknowledged a rise in piracy off the Somali coast partially fueled by drought and famine. At least half a dozen attacks have occurred in the last month, he said.

US Defense Secretary Jim Mattis also expressed concerns about the resurgence of Somali piracy during his recent visit to the American military base in Djibouti. Last month, an oil tanker was hijacked by suspected pirates off the coast of Somalia, the first such hijacking in the region in five years.

At the same time, some 40 U.S. troops are being readied for travel to Somalia to play a support role training the Somali National Army to create efficient logistics networks to supply their troops. “This is part of a routine deployment that has been really in the works for quite some time,” Gen. Waldhauser said.

Somalia and its international partners are working to train a 28,000-person national army after more than two decades of civil war and turmoil. The insurgent group al-Shabab still controls an estimated 10 percent of the country and conducts regular attacks against military and civilian targets. Somalia relies largely on the 22,000-person African Union Mission in Somalia (AMISOM) for its security.

About three million Somalis face food insecurity and a national disaster was declared last month.