Newswire : Young researcher from Ivory Coast tapped for women in science prize

Adjata Kamara, scientific researcher

Nov. 14, 2022 (GIN) – Twenty-five-year-old Adjata Kamara’s specialized research into plant-based biopesticides brought her to the attention of the L’Oréal Foundation and UNESCO – two organizations which aim to give visibility to women researchers worldwide. 
 
This week, Kamara was among 20 young women working in science to receive the UNESCO/L’Oreal prize. She had been exploring the use of plant extracts, fungi and beneficial bacteria on yams rather than chemicals which, she said, depletes the soil. Yams are a root that is highly prized in sub-Saharan Africa.
 
“The prize allows me to show my research to other women, to other countries and it puts a little pressure on me because I tell myself that now I have to be a role model for young girls in science,” she said.
 
Adjata explains that her goal is to develop “biopesticides based on plant extracts, fungi and beneficial bacteria,” in order to treat without chemicals this anomaly that disrupts the production of a plant that is the basis of staple food in several regions of Africa.
 
“I work on the development of biopesticides based on plant extracts, bacteria and also fungi. These bacteria and fungi are said to be beneficial and so I’m trying to find methods to control the fungi that attack post-harvest yams,” said Adjata.
 
Adjata is one of the twenty laureates of the “For women in science” young talent prize from sub-Saharan Africa who will receive US$10,000 to help them in their work.
 
She explained her interest in the field: “From an early age, my father had a mango plantation. And this plantation was attacked by mushrooms, but at that time we did not know it. And as the years passed, there was a drop in production. And from then on, I wanted to know why these mangoes were being attacked (by fungi), and why production was falling. And it’s since then that I devoted myself to it and that I loved science.”
 
 

First Black Astronaut to walk in space visits Greene County schools

Astronaut Dr. Bernard Harris views scholars classwork along with GCHS Principal Andrea Perry and ARLA Program Manager, Dr. Florence Williams.

Greene County School System was excited and honored to have a piece of history in the area.   National Math and Science Initiative’s (NMSI) Executive Director, Dr. Bernard Harris, the first African American to walk in space, spoke to students about the importance of STEM education and his experience as an Astronaut with NASA. Dr. Harris visited with Greene County High School 9th graders and Robert Brown Middle School 4th graders on Thursday, November 3, 2022.
Dr. Harris said that he was 13 years old when the first astronauts walked on the moon. “I made up my mind then that I wanted to walk in space one day and I never gave up on that dream.” When asked by students how did he prepare to be an astronaut, Dr. Harris said that it is necessary to focus on the STEM courses – Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics. He emphasized that scholars must go to college and earn at least a Master’s Degree. “Growing up my family physician was a great influence on me, so from college I went to medical school focusing on internal medicine, then I applied to NASA,” he explained. He shared that part of his NASA training certified him as a jet pilot and a scuba diver.
Greene County High School and Robert Brown Middle School are two sites for the Alabama Rural Learning Accelerator (ARLA) project.  ARLA services students in grades 6-9.  The Alabama Rural Learning Accelerator (ARLA), powered by NMSI, offers remote co-teaching, math support, and science coaching with ARLA project teachers housed at the University of Alabama at Birmingham.  

Dr. Williams stated that the overall goal of ARLA is to support hiring and retaining fully certified math and science teachers and provide long term solutions to fill those gaps and connect more students to potential careers based in science, technology, engineering and math.

L to R:  Superintendent Dr. Corey Jones, School Board President Dr. Carol Zippert, Astronaut Dr. Bernard Harris, Curriculum Coordinator Mrs. Barbara Martin, GCHS Principal Ms. Andrea Perry, ARLA Program Manager, Dr. Florence Williams.
L to R:  Superintendent Dr. Corey Jones, County Commissioner Corey Cockrell, Greene County Sheriff Jonathan Benison, School Resource Officer Steve Davis, Astronaut Dr. Bernard Harris, Eutaw Mayor Latasha Johnson, Eutaw Police Chief Tommy Johnson, School Board Member Leo Branch, School Board President Dr. Carol Zippert.
Astronaut Dr. Bernard Harris speaks with 4th grade scholars at Robert Brown Middle School
Astronaut Dr. Bernard Harris is show with Robert Brown Middle School Principal Mrs. Shawnta Owens

Alabama New South Alliance and Alabama Democratic Conference urge straight Democratic vote on Nov. 8

Yolanda Flowers -Governor

Will Boyd – US Senator
Wendell Major- Attorney General

Pamela J. Laffitte- Secretary of State
Curtis Travis- State Representative
Anita L. Kelly- Alabama Supreme Court

Yvette M. Richardson State Board of Education District No # 4

Bobby Singleton – State Senator

By: John Zippert, Co-Publisher

In Greene County, and many places across the state, the Alabama New South Alliance (ANSA) and the Alabama Democratic Conference (ADC) are urging voters to vote a straight Democratic Party ticket in the November 8th General Election.

The state’s two major Black and progressive voter organizations are encouraging voters to color in the oval next to the Democratic Party, at the top of the ballot, and vote for all the statewide and local candidates on the Democratic Party slate.

Some of the candidates you will be voting for if you follow this advice are pictured in this article. “Many people do not know that we have Black candidates concerned about all the people running for statewide offices in Alabama,” said Lorenzo French, Chair of the Greene County Democratic Executive Committee.

Yolanda Flowers is running for Governor against incumbent Kay Ivey.
Flowers, a retired educator, has a platform of more equitable policies in education, criminal justice, and healthcare than the current Governor. “All you need to know is that Flowers supports Medicaid Expansion and will sign for it as soon as she is in office,” said French.

In the U. S. Senate race, Dr Will Boyd is supported over Katie Britt for the seat being vacated by the retirement of Senator Richard Shelby. Boyd supports overturning the filibuster to allow for passage of voting rights, reproductive health care, and progressive economic policies in the Senate.
Boyd and other statewide candidates will be in Greene County at the Renaissance Theater on Thursday, November 3rd, to rally for a strong voter turnout next Tuesday.

Other statewide candidates endorsed by ANSA and ADC include: Terri Sewell for U. S. House of Representatives, Wendell Majors for Attorney General, Pamela Laffite for Secretary of State, Anita L. Kelly for Supreme Court Justice, Place 5, Wendell Majors for Attorney General and Yvette M. Richardson for State School Board, District 4.

Also endorsed are Bobby Singleton, State Senate District 24 and Curtis Travis, State Representative District 72.

In Greene County, all local Democratic candidates for local office, chosen in the May primary, are endorsed for the November 8th General Election, including: Joe Benison for Sheriff, Greg Griggers for District Attorney, Ronald Kent Smith for Coroner; Garria Spencer, District 1, Tennyson Smith, District 2, Corey Cockrell District 3, Allen Turner District 4 and Roshanda Sommerville District 5 -Greene County Commission; Robert Davis, District 1 and Brandon Merriweather, District 2 for Greene County Board of Education.

Amendments

Also on the November 8th ballot is one referendum and ten amendments to be voted on by voters statewide. ANSA has given the following recommendations on the Amendments.

First, there is a referendum on the recompilation and removal of racist language from the Alabama Constitution. ANSA suggests voting “YES” on this proposal.

On the Amendments, ANSA suggests voting “NO” on Numbers 1, 3 and 4 and “YES” on the others: 2, 5, 6, 7. 8, 9 and 10.

Amendment 1, is based on Anaiah’s Law and would allow judges in Alabama to restrict bail for persons charged with felony crimes, including:
Murder (other than capital murder), kidnapping, rape, sodomy, domestic violence, human trafficking, burglary, arson, and robbery, all in the 1st degree, as well as aggravated child abuse, sexual torture, and terrorism.
ANSA feels this would limit the power of judges to use their discretion in setting bail, based on the specific circumstances of the case. ANSA recommends a “NO” vote because too many Back people are in jail now, with high bail requirements they cannot meet. Some have been incarcerated for years, without trail, because they cannot meet bail.

ANSA urges a “NO” vote on Amendments 3, because it requires the Governor to notify the families of victims before commuting the sentences of offenders; and Amendment 4, because it would not allow changes in election
Laws within six months of an election, which limits changes required by emergencies like the recent pandemic.

ANSC urges a “YES” vote on Amendment 2 which would allow use of public funds from county and city government toward broadband; Amendment 5, which deals with “orphans’ business”, and I obsolete language; Amendment 6, would allow cities and towns that collect a special property tax to pay bonds or other debt service on public capital improvements.

Amendment 7 would clarify the authority of counties, cities, and towns to use public funds for economic development purposes. Amendments 8 and 9, apply locally to Shelby, Tuscaloosa, and Jefferson Counties for dealing with utility systems; Amendment 10, is a companion to the proposed recompiled Alabama Constitution of 2022. It would allow future amendments to the Alabama Constitution to be properly placed in the Constitution.

 

Trunk or Treat and games keep children safe

October 31, 2022 Witches, vampires, werewolfs and monsters were out to visits Trunk or Treat held at RH Young Community Center ( Old Carver School). The event was sponsored by the  Children Policy Council and the  City of Eutaw, numerous groups and organization participated. Treats and game help keep children safe. Everyone present had a good time, both young and old.

Newswire : Federal court halts Biden’s Student Loan Debt Forgiveness for now

By Brandon Patterson, NNPA
A federal appellate judge on October 21 temporarily blocked the Biden Administration from cancelling student debt in response to a lawsuit filed by six conservative states alleging they could be hurt financially by the plan.
The court blocked the plan after the states appealed a lower court’s decision to throw out their suit due to failure to show they would be hurt by it. The court ruling does not prevent the administration from operating the debt forgiveness application or prevent people from applying, the White House said. But no debt can be waived until the court issues a final decision. It is not clear how long the temporary decision will last.
The administration had intended to start cancelling loans as soon as October 23, court records show, according to USA Today. The plan, announced in August, would cancel $10,000 in debt for eligible applicants and $20,000 for Pell Grant recipients.

“Plaintiffs will suffer no irreparable injury from the provision of much-needed relief to millions of Americans, but the public interest would be greatly harmed by its denial,” the Biden Administration said in legal filings, adding that, if the court disagrees, any injunction should only apply to the states that filed the lawsuit, where about 2.8 million people are eligible for forgiveness, according to USA Today. Those states include Arkansas, Iowa, Kansas, Missouri, Nebraska, and South Carolina.

Conservatives have attacked the debt forgiveness plan as expensive overreach of executive authority since the plan was announced. In this case, the six states argued that the debt forgiveness plan could incentivize student loan borrowers with loans serviced by the states, which aren’t eligible for debt forgiveness, to swap those loans for federal loans that are eligible, costing the states money, according to USA Today.

The administration, however, says the Department of Education already changed its loan regulations to disallow the swaps, according to USA Today, rendering the issue moot. The states also argue, however, that the administration has no authority to cancel the debt at all. The administration has held that a 2003 law allows the executive branch to reduce or erase student loan debt.

The case is just one of many lawsuits over Biden’s debt cancellation plan. At least six different parties have challenged the plan in court. In most cases, however, the lawsuits have been quickly dismissed, according to
USA Today.

Voter registration and mobilization groups nationwide are saying young voters beed to turnout for the midterm elections to counteract the actions of conservative states that want to block student debt forgiveness.

Newswire: At least 10 million new Black voters likely headed to polls Nov. 8

Barbara Arnwine, president/founder of the Transformative Justice Coalition,
helps a student register to vote during the Arc of Justice Votercade.

By Dr. Barbara A. Reynolds

(TriceEdneyWire.com) – If pollsters believe African-Americans are too overwhelmed, distracted or disinterested to vote in the mid-term and 2024 national elections Nov. 8, they have neither heard nor seen the Arc of Justice 22 city votercade that started in Minneapolis on October 8 and recently finished in a celebration village in Jacksonville, Fla. with the goal of Ar registering 10 million more Black voters.
Civil Rights advocate and lawyer, Barbara Arnwine, head of the Transformative Justice Coalition is the president, visionary and conductor of the tour—which featured king-sized colorful buses with photos of the patron saint of voting, Rep. John Lewis, and the logos of Operation Push, the National Newspaper Publishers Association, some of the sponsors, on its side. Following the bus were scores of cars, lights-flashing, horns blowing , and energetic voices calling all to “Get out to vote.”
The buses showed up on crowded city streets, on Black college campuses and in rural villages where few thought about voting until the big buses showed up to make sure they knew that midterm votes matter. The votercade purposely chose routes that historically had low turnouts, but by the excitement the tour created that might be about to change.
“Voting is a celebration, everyone wins, when Americans can honor their constitutional right to vote,” says Arnwine.
In addition, at various stops, the Arnwine group gave books that in several White school districts were banned because they featured stories about people of color, slavery or civil rights that made White people uncomfortable. Arnwine and the tour have created so much national excitement about voting, the most powerful non-violence change agent Americans possess, that she was called to Los Angeles to tape the Dr. Phil show to remind the nation how crucial the midterm and national elections are in exercising the most fundamental right of an American citizen—and the dangers of losing it.
What did the nationwide Arc of Justice tour accomplish?
Arnwine pointed to Georgia, one of the most oppressive states in the nation for Black voters, where her coalition and the votercade made a major difference. “Just recently they had the largest voter turnout for a midterm election ever,” she said. “Blacks are defiant in Georgia, the heavy turnout for the midterm was equivalent to the first day of the presidential election. And that had never happened.”
Pointing to another significant turnabout in Georgia, she pointed to Marcus Arbery, the father of
Ahmaud Aubery, a 25-year-old Black man, who while jogging, was murdered by three White men, who have been convicted of the crime. She said that much of the family had not voted before Ahmaud’s death, but now they were with the motorcade, registering people to vote. “They have connected justice to voting, I am proud of that family.”
In Milwaukee, one of the poorest cities in the nation, they had a polling place, where few usually showed up to vote she said. But they had more people turning out to vote in that one day that the tour bus was there in their entire voting season.
College campuses provide a gold-mine for registering new voters, according to Arnwine. Morgan State, South Carolina State, and North Carolina Central are just a few college campuses the votercade rolled up on. “At one college we found that 40 percent of the college students were unregistered. We were able to register scores of them. If we had not been there, would they have registered?” Arnwine also said the group had trained scores of millennials –those between 18 and 35—on voter registration and they are already plying their skills. “We need to invest more in our young people. They are vital to get out the vote drives.”
College campuses then, are places where more aggressive voter registration drives should be centered. This is because the vote will determine whether affirmative action which helps so many go to colleges and find employment will be stopped; whether police killing of unarmed Blacks will continue unabated, and where mobs of White supremacists terrorism will continue to rise.
Other groups on the votercade also added perspective. Bishop Tavis Grant, acting executive director of the Rainbow Push Coalition, asked “Why are laws making it harder to vote than to get an assault weapon? Why is it so dangerous for Black people to vote? That is because voting shifts the power scale. If our vote was not important, racists wouldn’t be trying so hard to resist it.”
Dr. Georgia Dunston, a nationally respected scientist, is voting rights committee chair of Black Women for Positive Change, which in collaboration with the Arc of Justice coalition sponsored a votercade in Norfolk, Va. and Richmond Va. Dunston says that democracy is on the ballot and if Trump and the Republican controlled Congress wins, it will be the end of our constitutional form of government, which will result in anarchy, a civil war. Trump has already indicated that if the GOP loses or if he is indicted, his people will rise, so that could mean blood in the streets. Well, Blacks are not going back to where White supremacists want to take us and neither are women, who would no longer have control over their own bodies if Trumpism wins. Civil war might be inevitable, although I am hopeful that won’t be the case.”
Dr. Dunston, along with Dr. Stephanie Myers, co-chair of BWPC, have designed a voter pledge card that they believe will help with the overall goal of gaining millions of new voters. It is called the John Lewis Good Trouble Voters Right Pledge. To encourage people to vote, gift cards are to be given to those who can return the most signed pledge cards. For more information see: Blackwomenforpositivechange.org.”

Four bingo entities distribute $616,999 for
September; Greenetrack switches from bingo to parimutuel

The  Greene County Sheriff Department issued a listing of the bingo distributions for September, totaling $616,999.19 from four of the five licensed bingo gaming facilities.  The bingo facilities regularly distributing through the sheriff include Frontier, River’s Edge, Palace and Bama Bingo.  Greenetrack, Inc. stopped its bingo gaming as of August 28, 2022, currently offering parimutuel gaming only. According to Greenetrack President/CEO Luther Winn, the distributions to local charities will be handled through the Greene County Racing Commission.
The recipients of the September  distributions from bingo gaming include Greene County Sheriff’s Department, the cities of Eutaw, Forkland, Union, and Boligee, the Greene County Board of Education and the Greene County Hospital (Health System).    Sub charities include Children’s Policy Council, Guadalupan Multicultural Services, Greene County Golf Course, Housing Authority of Greene County (Branch Heights), Department of Human Resources, the Greene County Library, Eutaw Housing Authority, Historical Society, REACH, Inc., Headstart  Community Service and This Belong To US. 
     Bama Bingo gave a total of $117,157.97 to the following: Greene County Sheriff’s Department, $48,070; City of Eutaw, $9,250; and the Towns of Forkland, Union and Boligee each, $3,875; Greene County Board of Education, $10,500, and the Greene County Health System,  $12,500. Sub Charities, each received $1,034.22 including REACH, Inc. Community Service received $470.10 and This Belong to Us received $94.02. 
Frontier (Dream, Inc.) gave a total of $114,995.78 to the following: Greene County Sheriff’s Department, $48,070; City of Eutaw, $9,250; and the Towns of Forkland, Union and Boligee each, $3,875; Greene County Board of Education, $10,500; Greene County Health System, $12,500. Sub Charities each received $1,034.22, including the Historical Society and REACH, Inc.  Community Service received $470.10 and This Belong to Us received $94.02.
    River’s Edge (Next Level Leaders and Tishabee Community Center Tutorial Program) gave a total of  $118,288 to the following:  Greene County Sheriff’s Department, $48,070; City of Eutaw, $12,500; and the Towns of Forkland, Union and Boligee  each, $3,875; Greene County Board of Education, $10,500; Greene County Health System, $12,500. Sub Charities each, $1,027,, including the Historical Society and REACH, Inc.  Community Service received $467 and This Belong to Us received $92.
     Palace (TS Police Support League) gave a total of $266,558.44 to the following:  Greene County Sheriff’s Department, $111,426.26; City of Eutaw, $21,441.50; and the Towns of Forkland, Union and Boligee each, $8,982.25; Greene County Board of Education, $24,339, and the Greene County Health System, $28,975. Sub Charities received $2,017.89, including the Historical Society and REACH, Inc. Community Service received $917.22 and This Belong to Us received $183.44. The sheriff’s supplement for September from four bingo facilities totaled $70,631.80.

Superintendent gives overview of state 
testing; CSFO says system still in year-end close-out

At the Greene County Board of Education’s regular monthly meeting held October 17, 2022, Superintendent Dr. Corey Jones presented an overview of the State’s process for annual student assessments.  The Alabama Comprehensive Assessment Program (ACAP) is administered to grades 3,4,5,7,8.  The 11th grade students are assessed through the ACT test. Dr. Jones stated that  results for testing administered in March of the 2021-2022 school year have been determined but the grading of school systems and the listing of individual schools in the state on the failing list will be available by the November board meeting.
Dr. Jones continued his report with positive news on each of the schools. At the conclusion of his report, Superintendent Jones presented a Certificate of Appreciation to Dr. Carol P. Zippert for her eight years of service on the board. Ms. Kashaya Cockrell, who was not present, was acknowledged for her six years on the board.  Their board positions will continue until new board members are sworn in at the November board meeting.
CSFO Marquita Lennon presented preliminary monthly financials as of September.  Ms. Lennon explained that the school system is still in the process of close-out for the school year ending September 30, 2022 and the financials presented were for informational purposes only.  The system close-out will be completed by the November board meeting. Her report included the following: General Fund Balance-$2,921,991; Accounts Payable Check Register – $1,135,295; Payroll Register $949,220.38; Combined Ending Fund Balance – $4.029,886.33; Total Revenue – $230,217.
In other business the board approved the following personnel items recommended by the superintendent.

Employment: Valencia Moore, Special Education teacher, Robert Brown Middle School, 2022-2023
Resignations: Mary Caruthers, Bus Driver, Department of Transportation, effective September 30, 2022; William Mack, Bus Driver, Department of Transportation, effective October 7, 2022; Jamiyiah Smith, 5th Grade Teacher, Robert Brown Middle School, effective October 14, 2022.
Additional after school tutorial, effective Monday, Oct. 10, 2022:
Eutaw Primary School: Gloria McGhee; Walter Taylor. Robert Brown Middle School: Tyletha Lord, Substitute Teacher.  Bus Drivers: Gerald Holloway; Freddie Merriweather, David Peterson; George Pippen; Wennoah Peebles; Jerdin Gray; Marsha Powell, Bus Aide; Lesley Carlisle, Substitute Driver; Johnny Pelt, Substitute Driver.
2022-2023 After School Tutorial Rate of Pay: Lead Teacher – $35 per hour; Teacher – $30 per hour; Bus Driver – $25 per hour x 2; Bus Aide – $12 per hour x 2.
Supplement Basketball Contracts for 2022-2023 School Term: Rodney Wesley, Head Varsity  Coach, Boys Basketball Team; Halven Carodine, Assistant Boys Basketball Coach; Howard Crawford, Head B. Team Basketball Coach; Ralph Marshall, Head Girls Basketball Coach; Torethia Mitchell, Assistant Girls Basketball Coach; Quentin Walton, Baseball Coach; Shafontaye Myers, Girls Softball Coach.
Administrative services approved by the board:
* Payment of all bills, claims and payroll.
* Contract between Greene County Board and Behavioral Solutions of Mississippi.
* Amend School Resource Officers contract to ensure they receive 5% raise.
*Contract between Greene County Board and Druid City Basketball Officials ASSO contract for 202202023 School Term.
* Approval to appeal Rhinnie Scott v. Greene County Board of Education Ruling.

Dr. Carol P.  Zippert is presented a Certificate of Appreciation by Superintendent Dr. Corey Jones for her eight years of dedicated service on the Greene County Board of Education.

Greene County Commission adjusts budget for landfill closing, equipment purchase and election expenditures

The Greene County Commission held its monthly meeting, Tuesday, October 11, 2022, since Monday October 10 was observed as National Indigenous Peoples Day. Recommendations for 2022 budget amendments were key items on the agenda.  CFO Macaroy Underwood reported that three areas of the budget needed additional resources to cover expenditures.  The Primary Election and run-off required additional funds totaling $74,663.76 from the General Fund Account.  These costs included salaries and benefits, fees, training services, election supplies, postage and advertising.

Equipment for the Highway Department required an additional $717,140.76, supported by $595,985.05 transferred from Bond Funds and a $121,155.71 from a CD cashed-in. This cost was to support road and construction equipment for the Highway Department.

    The third area was the cost of closing the county’s Solid Waste Landfill.  According to County Engineer Willie Branch, the landfill had been out-of-use for approximately 14 years and the county had run out of extensions to affect the closing.  According to CFO Underwood, the landfill closure would cost $452,934.52 for construction labor, equipment and materials. Once the landfill is closed, the county must monitor it (for health and safety reasons) for the next 30 years.  Following extensive discussion of the available funding sources necessary for this project, the commission approved applying $260,000 from the rent received from Greenetrack, which Underwood noted, had not been allocated in the budget.  The remaining $192,934.52 needed would come from the county’s Bingo Fund.

The Commission approved the following board appointments. Dr. Karen Roberson Lewis was appointed by Commissioner Tennyson Smith, (District 2) to the Greene County Health System Board; Jonathan Woodruff was re-appointed by Commissioner Corey Cockrell (District 3) to the E-911 Board; Commissioner LaPortia Brown (District 1) re-appointed Sheila Daniels to the DHR Board. The appointment for District 3 Library Board was tabled.
In other business, the Commission acted on the following.
*Approved ADECA funds reimbursement for Vulcan Construction Materials.
*Approved advertising for two Solid Waste worker positions.
*Approved advertising for Assistant Engineer with EIT positions.
*Approved accepting annual bids with the County reserving the right to purchase off any allowable lower national, state or ACCA bid.
*Approved resuming sticker program (garbage pickup) and only picking up from customers with current stickers.
*Approved bid from Eaves Construction for Solid Waste Landfill closing.
*Approved Weather Preparedness Tax Holiday for February 24-26, 2023.

Bingo distribution for August totals $616,999

The  Greene County Sheriff Department issued a listing of the bingo distributions for August, totaling $616,999.32 from four of the five licensed bingo gaming facilities.  The August distribution reported by the sheriff includes $24,000 from Greenetrack, Inc. and $51,000 from the Sheriff’s Supplemental Fund distributed to the Greene County Commission.  
  The bingo facilities regularly distributing through the sheriff include Frontier, River’s Edge, Palace and Bama Bingo.  The recipients of the August distributions from bingo gaming include Greene County Sheriff’s Department, the cities of Eutaw, Forkland, Union, and Boligee, the Greene County Board of Education and the Greene County Hospital (Health System).    
  Sub charities include Children’s Policy Council, Guadalupan Multicultural Services, Greene County Golf Course, Housing Authority of Greene County (Branch Heights), Department of Human Resources, the Greene County Library, Eutaw Housing Authority, Historical Society, REACH, Inc., Headstart  Community Service and This Belong To US. 
Bama Bingo gave a total of $117,157.87 to the following: Greene County Sheriff’s Department, $48,070; City of Eutaw, $9,250; and the Towns of Forkland, Union and Boligee each, $3,875; Greene County Board of Education, $10,500, and the Greene County Health System,  $12,500. Sub Charities, each received $1,034.22 including REACH,Inc. Community Service received $470.10 and This Belong to Us received $94.02.  
Frontier (Dream, Inc.) gave a total of $114,995.01 to the following: Greene County Sheriff’s Department, $48,070; City of Eutaw, $9,250; and the Towns of Forkland, Union and Boligee each, $3,875; Greene County Board of Education, $10,500; Greene County Health System, $12,500. Sub Charities each received $870.53, including the Historical Society and REACH, Inc.  Community Service received $395.69 and This Belong to Us received $79.14.
  River’s Edge (Next Level Leaders and Tishabee Community Center Tutorial Program) gave a total of  $118,288 to the following:  Greene County Sheriff’s Department, $48,070; City of Eutaw, $12,543; and the Towns of Forkland, Union and Boligee  each, $3,875; Greene County Board of Education, $10,500; Greene County Health System, $12,500. Sub Charities each, $1,027,, including the Historical Society and REACH, Inc.  Community Service received $467 and This Belong to Us received $92.
 Palace (TS Police Support League) gave a total of $266,558.44 to the following:  Greene County Sheriff’s Department, $111,426.26; City of Eutaw, $21,441.50; and the Towns of Forkland, Union and Boligee each, $8,982.25; Greene County Board of Education, $24,339, and the Greene County Health System, $28,975. Sub Charities received $2,017.89, including the Historical Society and REACH, Inc. Community Service received $917.22 and This Belong to Us received $183.44. The sheriff’s supplement for August from four bingo facilities totaled $47,929.93.