COVID-19

As of October 20, 2021 at 10:00 AM
(according to Alabama Political Reporter)

Alabama had 815,989 confirmed cases of coronavirus,
(6,504) more than last week with 15,311 deaths (442) more
than last week)

Greene County had 1,262 confirmed cases, (19 more cases than last week), with 44 deaths

Sumter Co. had 1,320 cases with 38 deaths

Hale Co. had 3,106 cases with 88 deaths

Note: Greene County Physicians Clinic has testing and vaccination for COVID-19; Call for appointments at 205/372-3388, Ext. 142; ages 18 and up.

COVID-19

As of October 12, 2021 at 10:00 AM
(according to Alabama Political Reporter)

Alabama had 809,485 confirmed cases of coronavirus,
(8,057) more than last week with 14,869 deaths (398) more
than last week)

Greene County had 1,241 confirmed cases, (10 more cases than last week), with 44 deaths

Sumter Co. had 1,298 cases with 38 deaths

Hale Co. had 2,964 cases with 86 deaths

Note: Greene County Physicians Clinic has testing and vaccination for COVID-19; Call for appointments at 205/372-3388, Ext. 142; ages 18 and up.

 

COVID-19

As of October 4, 2021 at 10:00 AM
(according to Alabama Political Reporter)

Alabama had 801,428 confirmed cases of coronavirus,
(8,796) more than last week with 14,471 deaths (316) more
than last week)

Greene County had 1,231 confirmed cases, (10 more cases than last week), with 44 deaths

Sumter Co. had 1,256 cases with 37 deaths

Hale Co. had 2,948 cases with 86 deaths

Note: Greene County Physicians Clinic has Johnson and Johnson, one dose vaccination for COVID-19; Call for appointments at 205/372-3388, Ext. 142; ages 18 and up.

COVID-19

As of September 28, 2021 at 10:00 AM
(according to Alabama Political Reporter)

Alabama had 792,632 confirmed cases of coronavirus,
(17,101) more than last week with 14,155b deaths (695) more
than last week)

Greene County had 1,247 confirmed cases, (17 more cases than last week), with 43 deaths

Sumter Co. had 1,247 cases with 36 deaths

Hale Co. had 2,934 cases with 86 deaths

Note: Greene County Physicians Clinic has Johnson and Johnson, one dose vaccination for COVID-19; Call for appointments at 205/372-3388, Ext. 142; ages 18 and up.

COVID-19

As of September 21, 2021 at 10:00 AM
(according to Alabama Political Reporter)

Alabama had 775,531 confirmed cases of coronavirus,
(21,289) more than last week with 13,460 deaths (742) more
than last week)

Greene County had 1,198 confirmed cases, (21 more cases than last week), with 42 deaths

Sumter Co. had 1,238 cases with 35 deaths

Hale Co. had 2,877 cases with 81 deaths

Note: Greene County Physicians Clinic has Johnson and Johnson, one dose vaccination for COVID-19; Call for appointments at 205/372-3388, Ext. 142; ages 18 and up.

COVID-19

As of August 24, 2021 at 10:00 AM

(according to Alabama Political Reporter)

Alabama had 665,653 confirmed cases of coronavirus,

(24,267) more than last week with 12,000 deaths (168) more

than last week)

 

Greene County had 1073 confirmed cases, (38 more cases than last week), with 39 deaths

Sumter Co. had 1,1632 cases with 34 deaths

Hale Co. had 2,549 cases with 80 deaths

Note: Greene County Physicians Clinic has Johnson and Johnson, one dose vaccination for COVID-19; Call for appointments at 205/372-3388, Ext. 142; ages 18 and up.

COVID-19

As of May 19, 2021 at 10:00 AM (according to Alabama Political Reporter) Alabama had 540,891 confirmed cases of coronavirus, (9,140) more than last week with 11,045 deaths (48) more than last week)

Greene County had 926 confirmed cases, (1 more cases than last week), with 34 deaths

Sumter Co. had 1,052 cases with 32 deaths

Hale Co. had 2,243 cases with 78 deaths

Note: Greene County Physicians Clinic has Johnson and Johnson, one dose vaccination for COVID-19; Call for appointments at 205/372-3388, Ext. 142; ages 18 and up.

Newswire: COVID-19 vaccines finally arrive in Africa, but at what price

Health Ministry at Dakar, Senegal with vaccine

Mar. 1, 2021 (GIN) – Long-awaited deliveries of the Covid-19 vaccine are finally reaching the shores of Africa, bringing relief to a continent that appeared abandoned by the giant pharma companies and the rich nations that snapped up early supplies.  Ghana, with a population of over 30 million, just received 600,000 doses of the AstraZeneca vaccine through the World Health Organization’s vaccine-sharing initiative known as Covax. The Covax project purchases vaccines with the help of wealthier countries and distributes them equitably to all countries. President Joe Biden pledged $4 billion to the Covax program last week. But what an African country will end up paying for the vaccine outside of Covax is “meant for confidential discussion,” Afreximbank told Reuters. The AU also declined to comment.  Now, a document provided to Reuters by two sources provides the first glimpse at the prices that manufacturers are offering African nations outside of the COVAX global vaccine sharing scheme.  Pfizer will provide 50 million doses of its two-shot vaccine at $6.75 each (or $650 million), the document showed. J&J will provide 120 million doses of its single-shot vaccine at $10 each ($1.2 billion). Population size will determine how much of each vaccine various African countries will be offered.  Nigeria, the continent’s most populous nation, stands to pay roughly $283 million if it takes its full allocation of 42 million doses. Cash-strapped copper producer Zambia would have to find $25 million for its allocation of less than 4 million doses, according to the document.  While little controversy has been raised over western prices, a bellow of outrage appeared on the front page of the British Financial Times, attacking the “African price for the Russia vaccine” as being triple the cost of rivals – and accusing Moscow with offering unaffordable jabs to countries priced out of deals with western drug sellers. Western drug prices for Africa may be heavily discounted compared to what wealthier nations are paying, but some experts worry about countries already struggling to manage the economic fallout of the pandemic having to borrow more money to protect their people. “No country should have to take on debt to pay for the vaccine,” said Tim Jones, head of policy at the Jubilee Debt Campaign, a British charity working to end poverty.   Professor Joseph Benie, head of the National Institute of Public Hygiene in Abidjan, Ivory Coast, defended their choice of the Russian Sputnik – also the pick of Zimbabwe, the Central African Republic and Guinea. “We’re not in a position where we can say no to any vaccine. We’ve opted for the Pfizer vaccine, but we’re looking at other vaccines as well,” Benie said. “There’s an urgency now to start inoculating.”   

Newswire: Drug companies scooping super profits from the ‘people’s vaccine’

Moderna drug company headquarters


Feb. 1, 2021 (TriceEdneyWire.com/GIN) – Protected by undisclosed trade secrets and exclusive patents, a small group of drug companies has ensured that rich countries can lay claim to most of their miracle drugs while limiting the number of companies that can also produce the vital vaccines.
 
Now, opposition is building to the patent holders who use taxpayer dollars to fund research and development (R&D) but refuse to share their drug formulas with manufacturers in developing countries that could make their vaccines free and available to all.
 
Moderna, for example, through its COVID-19 vaccine partnership with the U.S. government, scored $2.48 billion in R&D (research and development) and supply funding from taxpayers for its program, sparking outcry from consumer watchdogs and others.
 
“This is the people’s vaccine,” objected consumer advocate Public Citizen. “It is not merely Moderna’s. Federal scientists helped invent it and taxpayers are funding its development. We all have played a role. It should belong to humanity.”
 
“We paid for the drugs,” echoed Dean Baker, senior economist at the Center for Economic and Policy Research, “and one of the things we would have liked is full transparency on all of the research results.”
 
“There’s no good argument for keeping (test) data secret,” he said. “But most of the drug companies insist on that. Maybe they want to misrepresent the safety or effectiveness of their drugs,” he surmised.
 
Finally, in an open letter to major drug companies from Doctors without Borders, the group wrote in part: “Clearly neither yours nor any other company can produce all the doses needed to vaccinate the whole world’s population.
 
“Your company faces a choice. Either you can defend business as usual and deny hundreds of millions rapid access to the vaccine in defense of your monopoly power. Or you can instead rise to the challenge and commit to a Peoples Vaccine, by pledging to do what is right for all people in all countries.”
 
GLOBAL INFORMATION NETWORK creates and distributes news and feature articles on current affairs in Africa to media outlets, scholars, students and activists in the U.S. and Canada. Our goal is to introduce important new voices on topics relevant to Americans, to increase the perspectives available to readers in North America and to bring into their view information about global issues that are overlooked or under-reported by mainstream media.